Tuesday, July 7, 2015

Marine Corps, Navy leaders praise FRC East team for F-35B modification efforts

Deputy Commander Fleet Readiness Centers Dennis J.  West addresses the Fleet Readiness Center East F-35 team during an informal assembly, June 18.   West and Deputy Commandant for Aviation Lt. Gen. Jon Davis, Headquarters Marine Corps, visited FRC East to congratulate the team on its outstanding performance during the past two years.  (U.S. Navy illustration)
Deputy Commander Fleet Readiness Centers Dennis J. West addresses the Fleet Readiness Center East F-35 team during an informal assembly, June 18. West and Deputy Commandant for Aviation Lt. Gen. Jon Davis, Headquarters Marine Corps, visited FRC East to congratulate the team on its outstanding performance during the past two years. (U.S. Navy illustration)

MCAS Cherry Point July 7, 2015 - On the verge of the Marine Corps achieving initial operational capability (IOC) for the Joint Strike Fighter, Marine Aviation and Navy Air Systems leaders skipped ahead of the formal celebrations to laud the Fleet Readiness Center (FRC) East team for its unrelenting efforts to deliver five modified F-35B aircraft.
FRC East Commander Col. Vincent Clark opened an informal assembly June 18, to recognize the artisans’ success and to acknowledge they met a July 1 commitment to Marine Corps aviation, the Joint Strike Fighter Program Office and Lockheed Martin.
“I never had any doubts that you’d make it and that you’d make it on time. I’m immensely proud of all of you and what you’ve done out here,” said Lt. Gen. Jon M. Davis, deputy commandant for Marine Aviation, calling FRC East a winning team that figured out how to get the job done. “You showed the world the way to get the [modifications] done on the F-35B, and how you can do it on a timeline. The whole world is watching you. They’re watching me. They’re watching us.”
In June 2012, COMFRC made the establishment of the F-35B modification line FRC East’s top priority, with an added stipulation of inducting the first aircraft a year later. Meeting these commitments will keep the Marines on track to reach IOC, which is when the aircraft is ready to be fielded and used in combat missions.
“I’m personally grateful you guys pulled this off, through all the challenges thrown at the depot,” said Dennis J. West, deputy commander of the Fleet Readiness Centers. “FRC East has the best aviation industrial specialists in the world.”
Although the F-35 modifications were a priority, day-to-day responsibilities of operating a Navy depot continued. The FRC team also had to deal with some curve balls thrown its way.
“We took some key leaders out of here to work some national issues; you went through two changes of command; you endured a mandated hiring freeze for almost a year; you had a furlough,” West said. “You had to make some really hard decisions across TMS (or type/model/series) to make this possible.”
Despite the challenges, much was accomplished along the way, West noted.
The readiness center produced 301 aircraft, 415 engines and 57,693 components; achieved competency alignment; and more, all while establishing the F-35 capability — producing 16 modified F-35 aircraft, including the five to meet the Marines need.
According to FRC East leaders and managers, the artisans made an extensive effort to meet the July 1 goal. Those assigned to the project worked 12-hour days, five days of the week and eight hours most Saturdays and many Sundays over the course of the past year.
“The artisans are the real heroes here,” said David Rose, F-35 aircraft production manager. “They were thrown into the fire, learning things for the first time, making a sacrifice to work six to seven days a week. Many did it out of patriotism and a willingness to meet the mission put in front of them.”
“Give you what you need and you’ll turn wrenches and you’ll get it done, and you’ve proven it again here,” West said, speaking specifically to the team of more than 140 integrated product team leaders and JSF-dedicated artisans from all trades and contractors. “You operated like a depot in a depot. The artisans were applying their skill and artistry to building these jets. And you’ve built good solid reliable jets.”
West also expressed gratitude to other partners, such as Lockheed Martin and the JSF Program Office for the different roles each played in the process.
“Their support and help has made all the difference in achieving the milestone,” he said, acknowledging their cooperation and professionalism. “I view Lockheed Martin as a valuable partner in this, and I certainly anticipate more success with them in the future of JSF support.”
This accomplishment is only the beginning, according to leaders. “The JSF program is so big and only getting bigger. We’ll be in the business a long time,” West said, after running down a list of upcoming scheduled modifications and the projected needs of the Navy and Air Force within the next two years.
Davis said the Marines look forward to achieving initial operating capability by the end of July, with additional long-term plans to purchase 420 aircraft and activate about five squadrons at Cherry Point by 2022.

Monday, July 6, 2015

70% foreign stake in VN shipbuilder backed


Here is a ship built by Damen Song Cam Shipyard Company Ltd,. It is part of a contract ordered by a foreign investor. — Photo hoinguoidibien.vn

Hanoi June 6, 2015 (VNS) — The Transport Ministry has proposed that Shipbuilding Industry Corporation (SBIC) be allowed to sell 70 per cent of shares at Song Cam Shipbuilding Joint Stock Company to Damen Shipyards Group.
The proposal, which has been made along with the requirement for such a high volume of shares by the firm based in the Netherlands, comes even as Viet Nam's current regulations impose a 49 per cent limit on foreign investors' ownership in the domestic stock market.
In a document sent to the Prime Minister last week, which was reported by VnEpress.net, Deputy Minister Nguyen Van Cong evaluated that Damen's purchase will be an opportunity to lure more investment capital and set the foundation for better cooperation between Damen and other SBIC companies in the future.
"SBIC is making progress in market expansion, especially in the world market, to earn the trust of foreign investors," Cong noted.
Therefore, the ministry has asked the Prime Minister to allow the purchase, which will be held through direct negotiations between the two sides. A price will be set in line with regulations," Cong remarked.
Chairman of SBIC Nguyen Ngoc Su said the corporation has had several meetings with Damen's representatives to discuss various ways to solve difficulties and strengthen the investment cooperation between the two groups.
The SBIC has suggested Damen to first buy 49 per cent of Song Cam shares. Later, when business conditions become more convenient and the Government approves, the SBIC will sell more Song Cam shares to increase Damen's ownership to 70 per cent as it desires.
"However, Damen has no intension to purchase Song Cam shares in such a way. They expect the Government to allow it to buy 70 per cent of shares in one go," said Su.
Su pointed out that Damen has been SBIC's most important partner. It has been supplying materials to Vietnamese shipbuilding companies. For example, all the orders of Song Cam-Ben Kien shipbuilding factory come from Damen. The firm has also supplied to Ha Long shipbuilding factory, ensuring jobs for workers until the end of 2016.
It has plans to supply the orders of Pha Rung factory in the future.
However, after failing to expand its investments in Viet Nam, Damen has begun moving a number of orders to other countries.
Su noted that his corporation expects the Government to consider Damen's case an exception and allow it to purchase 70 per cent of Song Cam shares. 

Type 212A Romeo Romei Launched at Fincantieri Muggiano

Fincantieri

Trieste July 4, 2015 - Today, in the presence of the Minister of Justice Andrea Orlando, the Fincantieri shipyard in Muggiano (La Spezia) hosted the launching ceremony for the “Romeo Romei” submarine, the last of the four U212A “Todaro” class twin units ordered to Fincantieri by the Central Unit for Naval Armament – NAVARM for the Italian Navy. 
The ceremony was attended among others by the Chief of Staff of the Italian Navy, Admiral Giuseppe De Giorgi, while Fincantieri was represented by Giuseppe Bono and Vincenzo Petrone, respectively CEO and Chairman, political and local civil authorities. 
After the launching, outfitting works will be continued on the unit at the Integrated Naval shipyard in Muggiano (La Spezia), leading to its delivery scheduled in the second half of 2016. 
The submarine “Romeo Romei”, as its twin unit “Pietro Venuti” launched last October at the Muggiano shipyard, will feature highly innovative technological solutions. It will be entirely built with amagnetic material, using the most modern silencing techniques to reduce its acoustic signature. 
“Romei” has a surface displacement of 1,509 tonnes, an overall length of 55.9 meters, a maximum diameter of 7 meters, and can exceed 16 knots underwater. It has a 27-person crew. 
“Romei” is the 102nd submarine built in the shipyard of Muggiano since 1907, when the Italian Royal Navy’s “Foca” submarine was launched. Since then, this shipyard stands out for naval vessels building, not only for the Italian Navy but also worldwide (Brasil, Spain, Portugal, Sweden, Denmark). 
“Romei” is part of the second pair of submarines to be built in chronological order, and follows about one year the “Pietro Venuti”, currently under construction at the same shipyard in Muggiano. In the Navy’s fleet these vessels, whose delivery is scheduled in 2015 and 2016, will replace two submarines of the “Sauro” class (third series), built in the late 1980s. 
The submarine building programme is the continuation of the project launched in 1994 in cooperation with the German Submarine Consortium, which has already led to the construction in the past years of six vessels for Germany and two for Italy – the “Todaro” and the “Scirè”. These latter units, delivered by Fincantieri in 2006 and 2007 respectively, are already operating successfully as part of the Italian Navy’s fleet. 
Like the other vessels in the series, the “Romei” features highly innovative technological solutions. It is built entirely of amagnetic material, using the most modern silencing techniques to reduce its acoustic signature. Additionally, it is equipped with a silent propulsion system based on fuel cell technology, producing energy through an oxygen-hydrogen reaction independently from external oxygen, ensuring a considerably higher submerged than the conventional battery-based systems. It also features a fully integrated electro-acoustic and weapon-control system, as well as a modern platform automation system. 
“Romei” has a surface displacement of 1,509 tonnes, an overall length of 55.9 meters, a maximum diameter of 7 meters, and can exceed 16 knots underwater. It has a 27-person crew. 

Corvette Captain Romeo Romei. Gold Medal of Military Valour awarded posthumously.

Romeo Romei was born in Castelnuovo (Cattaro) on 14 August 1906. Student at the Naval Academy of Livorno since December 1924, in 1928 he received his appointment as midshipman, passing to Sub-Lieutenant on 1 July 1929, while embarked as navigating officer on the cruiser “Trieste”. Promoted to Lieutenant in 1933, he requested to pass on submarines and commanded the Perla, participating in special missions during the Spanish Civil War. 
He was called back home from the naval base in Tobruk on 10 June 1940 with the declaration of the War, taking the lead of the submarine Pier Capponi and distinguishing himself in audacious and successful combat missions, so much so to be defined the "abysses corsair". In a war mission led on 10 November 1940 in the Strait of Sicily (50 miles SE from Malta), he attacked a British naval formation - consisting of an aircraft carrier and two battleships convoyed by several destroyers – heavily, probably hitting a battleship. 
On 31 March 1941, the unit left Messina for a mission, heading towards the central Mediterranean Sea. It was torpedoed by the British submarine Rorqual, sinking about 17 miles south of Stromboli. Among the crew there were no survivors. 
Other decorations: 
• Bronze Medal for Military Valour (Western Mediterranean, 22 June 1940) 
• Bronze Medal for Military Valour (Mediterranean, 10 June 1940 – 12 April 1941) 

First Female Divers Crew and Operate a Dual-Mode Underwater Vehicle (With VIdeo)



Newport News July 6, 2015 - Huntington Ingalls Industries Undersea Solutions Group (USG) subsidiary made history in June as its two female divers became the first women to crew and drive a dual-mode underwater vehicle (DMUV). Chloe Mallet, an ocean engineer, and Andrea Raff, a mechanical engineer, crewed and operated USG's Proteus, a submersible able to operate as a manned swimmer delivery vehicle (SDV) and as an unmanned undersea vehicle (UUV).
Mallet and Raff are certified as rescue divers. They have undergone extensive training with Proteus and assist with its maintenance. To prepare for operating the vehicle, the women trained in the company's test tank and supported pre- and post-dives with USG's more experienced pilots.
Mallet and Raff individually took Proteus out and co-piloted it in Florida's Saint Andrews Bay with USG Vice President Ross Lindman as the pilot.
"The opportunity to jump in is exciting," Mallet said. "We help with maintenance on the boat and learn as we go when it's in the maintenance bay at the port, but this was the first time ever in the water. We'll continue training as co-pilots and then pilot it with an experienced diver."
Mallet and Raff are the only two women on USG's seven-person dive team that works with Proteus. When in use in the manned mode, the vehicle is flooded with water and can submerge to depths up to 150 feet.
"I felt prepared, but it was still different than I thought it was going to be," Raff said. "It's pitch black inside, and all you can see is the computer screen and the buttons. We have testing for customers scheduled so it'll be exciting to see how Proteus operates in the future with our customers."
Proteus weighs 8,240 pounds and is designed to operate as a manned SDV or UUV. It can be used for integrating and testing payloads, transporting and installing equipment on the sea floor, inspecting undersea infrastructure, and transporting a team of combat swimmers and cargo.
Undersea Solutions Group develops and builds specialized manned and unmanned undersea vehicles for military customers around the world. Formerly The Columbia Group's Engineering Solutions Division, USG has built or converted specialized craft for a variety of purposes, including support of submersibles and submarines, special warfare, testing of mine warfare systems, torpedo countermeasures and more. The division, originally established in 1972, reports to HII's Newport News Shipbuilding division and operates in Panama City Beach, Florida.
 

Saturday, July 4, 2015

PLA Navy holds joint live-fire confrontation exercise in Yellow Sea


A new-type guided-missile destroyer fires an anti-aircraft missile. The North China Sea Fleet of the PLA Navy organized and conducted a joint live-fire confrontation exercise in the Yellow Sea on Thursday. The participating troops also include those from the East China Sea Fleet, the Second Artillery Force and the Jinan Military Area Command.

A warship fires its main gun. The North China Sea Fleet of the PLA Navy organized and conducted a joint live-fire confrontation exercise in the Yellow Sea on Thursday. The participating troops also include those from the East China Sea Fleet, the Second Artillery Force and the Jinan Military Area Command.


A KJ-200 early-warning aircraft is seen in the confrontation exercise. The North China Sea Fleet of the PLA Navy organized and conducted a joint live-fire confrontation exercise in the Yellow Sea on Thursday. The participating troops also include those from the East China Sea Fleet, the Second Artillery Force and the Jinan Military Area Command.

A shore-to-ship missile launching truck launches an anti-ship missile. The North China Sea Fleet of the PLA Navy organized and conducted a joint live-fire confrontation exercise in the Yellow Sea on Thursday. The participating troops also include those from the East China Sea Fleet, the Second Artillery Force and the Jinan Military Area Command.

A warship fires an anti-ship missile. The North China Sea Fleet of the PLA Navy organized and conducted a joint live-fire confrontation exercise in the Yellow Sea on Thursday. The participating troops also include those from the East China Sea Fleet, the Second Artillery Force and the Jinan Military Area Command.


A submarine is seen in the confrontation exercise. The North China Sea Fleet of the PLA Navy organized and conducted a joint live-fire confrontation exercise in the Yellow Sea on Thursday. The participating troops also include those from the East China Sea Fleet, the Second Artillery Force and the Jinan Military Area Command.



America, Independence and Freedom: Three Great Names That Go Great With Navy Ships

By Joshua L. Wick
Naval History and Heritage Command, Communication and Outreach Division

When many Americans think of the 4th of July, a few words come to mind: Freedom, Independence, America. These words carry a certain weight; they represent power, strength and fortitude. So it’s no wonder why some of the greatest U.S. Navy ships have born these names.

Since the establishment of America’s Navy there have been very few years in which Sailors were not actively serving aboard ships with these names. To truly know these Sailors, we need to know their ships – as it is their ships bear witness to their selfless service to the country. The 4th of July, the anniversary of the birth of American freedom and independence, is a great time to reflect on the ships that have carried those names to the far corners of the earth in defense of America, freedom and independence.

The History of Navy’s ‘America’

The first ship to carry the name America, a 74-gun man-of-war, was laid down in May 1777. She never served the nation of her namesake; upon completion of construction she was gifted to France in appreciation of the partnerships with the new nation. The next ship was a racing yacht turned Confederate Civil War blockade runner turned Union blockader. Then passenger liner America saw service as a troop transport in World War I. The next in the line and the most famous to date is the Kitty Hawk-class carrier USS America (CVA 66). Her 30 years of service is just as interesting as her sinking. Her active service included deployments to in support of action in Vietnam, Lebanon, and Libya, as well as Operations Desert Shield, Desert Storm, and U.N. peacekeeping efforts over Bosnia. After retirement, America served her Navy by being sunk during a live-fire test and controlled scuttling ultimately helping naval shipbuilders and engineers better understand ship survivability. Lessons learned have been incorporated into following ship designs.

Arriving in New York Harbor, with her decks crowded with troops returning home from France, 1919. Photographed by E. Muller, Jr., New York. Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2007. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.
Arriving in New York Harbor, with her decks crowded with troops returning home from France, 1919. Photographed by E. Muller, Jr., New York. Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2007. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

USS America (CV-66) Underway in the Indian Ocean on 24 April 1983. Photographer: PH2 Robert D. Bunge. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.
USS America (CV-66) Underway in the Indian Ocean on 24 April 1983. Photographer: PH2 Robert D. Bunge. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command
The ‘America’ We Know Today 

Commissioned in October 2014, USS America (LHA 6), is first in her class and unlike any other amphibious assault ship in the fleet. She is specifically designed and built for flexibility of operation, energy efficiency and is able to handle the future of joint multinational maritime expeditionary operations. The ship and her Marine Corps elements can support small-scale contingency operations of an expeditionary strike group while remaining adaptable to new platforms like the F-35B Joint Strike Fighter and MV-22B Osprey.

PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 19, 2015) The amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) is underway off the coast of San Diego preparing for final contract trials.
PACIFIC OCEAN (Feb. 19, 2015) The amphibious assault ship USS America (LHA 6) is underway off the coast of San Diego preparing for final contract trials.

The History of Navy’s ‘Freedom’

The Navy’s first ship to be called Freedom actually started as the German ship, SS Wittekind, built in Hamburg, Germany in 1894. She was seized by the United States Shipping Board in 1917 and renamed Iroquois. First chartered by the Army as a transport vessel she was renamed Freedom (ID 3024) in 1918. Shortly after she was acquired by the U.S. Navy on January 24, 1919 she only operated briefly as a member of the Navy’s Cruiser and Transport Force before she was decommissioned in September 1919. The second Freedom (IX 43) was an auxiliary schooner, acquired by the Navy in 1940. She was assigned to the Naval Academy where she has served in a noncommissioned status through 1962.

(ID # 3024) In port in 1919, while engaged in transporting U.S. troops home from France. Note inscription at the bottom of the image: U.S.S. Freedom, the ship that brought me home. Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1970. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.
(ID # 3024) In port in 1919, while engaged in transporting U.S. troops home from France. Note inscription at the bottom of the image: U.S.S. Freedom, the ship that brought me home. Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1970. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

The ‘Freedom’ We Know Today

USS Freedom (LCS 1) is a response to the Navy’s need for smaller, multipurpose warships that operate in littoral or coastal water. In addition to operating in the shallows, Littoral Combat Ships are designed to evolve with an ever changing battle space and can be reconfigured for surface warfare, anti-submarine warfare and mine countermeasures missions. Limited crew requirements, speed exceeding 40+ knots, and maneuverability make Freedom a flexible combatant. On Feb. 16, 2010 Freedom made her maiden deployment to the Caribbean and Eastern Pacific via the Panama. Most recently, in May 2014 Freedom successfully conducted the first combined at sea operation between an unmanned MQ-8B Fire Scout and manned SH-60 Seahawks.

PACIFIC OCEAN (April 28, 2015) The littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) transits alongside the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in preparation for a replenishment-at-sea training exercise. U.S. Navy ships are underway conducting an independent deployer certification exercise off the coast of Southern California.
PACIFIC OCEAN (April 28, 2015) The littoral combat ship USS Freedom (LCS 1) transits alongside the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) in preparation for a replenishment-at-sea training exercise. U.S. Navy ships are underway conducting an independent deployer certification exercise off the coast of Southern California.

The History of Navy’s ‘Independence’

 Of the three names in this post, the name Independence has graced more ships than the other two. The firstIndependence, a Continental sloop built in Baltimore, Md., was sailing with Ranger and John Paul Jones in 1776 when Ranger received the first national salute of our flag. The next Independence, a ship-of-the-line, was commissioned in June 1814 and immediately joined frigate Constitution protecting Boston Harbor during the War of 1812. Over the course of the next 99 years, she was brought in and out of service (mostly in) until finally decommissioning just two years shy of the 100th anniversary of her launching. From one of the Navy’s longest-lived ships, to one of its shortest-lived, the next Independence was a steamer commissioned Nov. 16, 1918 that made one cargo run to Europe, returning to the state and decommissioned just four months and four days later on March 20, 1919. Two aircraft carriers have born the name. The first, (CVL 22), was commissioned Jan. 14, 1943 and served with distinction during World War II. The fifth Independence, (CVA-62), was commissioned Jan. 10, 1959 and served for more than 39 years seeing action in the Cuban Missile Crisis, Vietnam and Desert Storm before being decommissioned Sept. 30, 1998.

The ‘Independence’ We Know Today

At anchor, while wearing dazzle camouflage, circa 1918. This photograph may have been taken in the San Francisco Bay area, California, before she was taken over by the Navy. She was built in 1918 at San Francisco as SS Independence. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.
At anchor, while wearing dazzle camouflage, circa 1918. This photograph may have been taken in the San Francisco Bay area, California, before she was taken over by the Navy. She was built in 1918 at San Francisco as SS Independence. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.
The sixth ship to bear the name is USS Independence (LCS 2). Commissioned in January 2010, her unique design and use of interchangeable technology, like USS Freedom (LCS 1), allows for operational flexibility supporting various mission requirements. In April 2012 she passed through the Panama Canal for the first time, trained with the Mexican Navy, and accomplished her first visit to a foreign port when she put in to Manzanillo, Mexico where her Sailors participated in a community outreach project. In 2014 she took part and successfully completed RIMPAC 2014.

PACIFIC OCEAN (July 23, 2014) The littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2) transits during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014.
PACIFIC OCEAN (July 23, 2014) The littoral combat ship USS Independence (LCS 2) transits during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014.

For most of the 239 years since America seized freedom and declared its independence, our Navy has included ships that go by those names; lasting symbols of their namesakes and reminding us all of the historic document boldly signed by our nation’s founding fathers on that fourth day of July day in 1776.

Official U.S. Navy photo illustration by Annalisa Underwood, Naval History and Heritage Command /RELEASED.
Official U.S. Navy photo illustration by Annalisa Underwood, Naval History and Heritage Command /RELEASED.

Friday, July 3, 2015

Criminal Proceedings Against Former Employees of ST Marine

Singapore July 1, 2015 - On 12 September 2011, Singapore Technologies Engineering Ltd (“ST Engineering”) announced that the Corrupt Practices Investigation Bureau (“CPIB”) was investigating certain transactions involving former and current employees of Singapore Technologies Marine Ltd. ST Marine has been extending its fullest cooperation to the CPIB in its investigation since 2011.
We also refer to our announcements on 11 December 2014, 30 December 2014 and 10 June 2015 in relation to the criminal prosecution of five former employees of ST Marine.
We wish to announce that on 1 July 2015, two former employees of ST Marine, Han Yew Kwang (“Han”) and Tan Mong Seng (“Tan”) were charged in the State Courts of Singapore.
Han was the Chief Operating Officer of ST Marine from June 2002 to June 2007, before leaving in June 2014 as Executive Vice President (Ship Building).  Han was charged with a total of eight (8) charges under section 6(b) read with section 29(a) of the Prevention of Corruption Act.
Tan was President (Commercial Business) of ST Marine from January 2000, before leaving in June 2002 as Chief Operating Officer / President (Commercial Business) of ST Marine.  Tan was charged with a total of one (1) charge under section 6(b) read with section 29(a) of the Prevention of Corruption Act.
The charges against Han and Tan are not expected to have any material impact on the consolidated net tangible assets or consolidated earnings per share of the ST Engineering Group for the current financial year.
ST Engineering is committed to maintaining high standards of corporate governance and recognises that fraud is detrimental to the reputation of the ST Engineering Group. ST Engineering does not condone fraud, including corruption and bribery, and is fully committed to proactively mitigating the risk of its occurrence.
ST Engineering will make timely further announcements, if necessary.