Saturday, August 20, 2011

Russian Navy News



Northern Fleet deck-based pilots are ahead of flight plan 08.19.2011Northern Fleet deck-based pilots are ahead of flight plan
Northern Fleet deck-based pilots are ahead of flight plan

Ka-52K helicopters to be equipped with Zhuk-AE radars08.19.2011Ka-52K helicopters to be equipped with Zhuk-AE radars
Ka-52K helicopters to be equipped with Zhuk-AE radars

USC shipyards may stop production due to lack of financing 08.19.2011USC shipyards may stop production due to lack of financing
USC shipyards may stop production due to lack of financing

Russian Navy to receive 12 Su-30SM fighters08.19.2011Russian Navy to receive 12 Su-30SM fighters
Russian Navy to receive 12 Su-30SM fighters

Pacific Fleet flagship prepares for long-range cruise08.19.2011Pacific Fleet flagship prepares for long-range cruise
Pacific Fleet flagship prepares for long-range cruise

Black Sea Fleet trains at sea08.18.2011Black Sea Fleet trains at sea
Black Sea Fleet trains at sea

Helicopter deck landing satellite system presented at MAKS-201108.18.2011Helicopter deck landing satellite system presented at MAKS-2011
Helicopter deck landing satellite system presented at MAKS-2011

Baltic Fleet task unit sailed off to attend Open Spirit 201108.18.2011Baltic Fleet task unit sailed off to attend Open Spirit 2011
Baltic Fleet task unit sailed off to attend Open Spirit 2011

JSC Russian Helicopters to equip Mistrals08.18.2011JSC Russian Helicopters to equip Mistrals
JSC Russian Helicopters to equip Mistrals

08.17.2011Russian defense ministry suspends procurement of MiGs
Russian defense ministry suspends procurement of MiGs
BLACKSEAFOR ships started joint tasks at sea08.17.2011BLACKSEAFOR ships started joint tasks at sea
BLACKSEAFOR ships started joint tasks at sea

Second phase of Prirazlomnaya oil platform construction is over08.17.2011Second phase of Prirazlomnaya oil platform construction is over
Second phase of Prirazlomnaya oil platform construction is over

Russian warship Severomorsk continues anti-piracy patrol 08.17.2011Russian warship Severomorsk continues anti-piracy patrol
Russian warship Severomorsk continues anti-piracy patrol

Baltic Fleet command talked on ships serviceability with Yantar Shipyard08.17.2011Baltic Fleet command talked on ships serviceability with Yantar Shipyard
Baltic Fleet command talked on ships serviceability with Yantar Shipyard

BrahMos missiles to be used in mountains 08.17.2011BrahMos missiles to be used in mountains
BrahMos missiles to be used in mountains

Pacific Fleet continues summer training period08.16.2011Pacific Fleet continues summer training period
Pacific Fleet continues summer training period

Damage control drill was held in Baltiysk08.16.2011Damage control drill was held in Baltiysk
Damage control drill was held in Baltiysk

Pacific Fleet attacked Japan 66 years ago08.16.2011Pacific Fleet attacked Japan 66 years ago
Pacific Fleet attacked Japan 66 years ago

Backlog of RSK MiG exceeds $4 bln08.15.2011Backlog of RSK MiG exceeds $4 bln
Backlog of RSK MiG exceeds $4 bln

Ex-Soviet carrier Kiev refitted into luxury hotel08.15.2011Ex-Soviet carrier Kiev refitted into luxury hotel
Ex-Soviet carrier Kiev refitted into luxury hotel


Friday, August 19, 2011

Second Fast Response Cutter Launched; Named for Coast Guard Hero, Richard Etheridge


Fast Response Cutter under construction
The Richard Etheridge is pierside following its launch on Aug. 18. U.S.Coast Guard Photo
The U.S. Coast Guard’s second 154-foot Fast Response Cutter, the Richard Etheridge, was launched at Bollinger Shipyards in Lockport, La., on Aug. 18. This marks a significant milestone in the Coast Guard’s acquisition of the Sentinel- class patrol boats, which will replace the service’s legacy 110-foot patrol boats. 
While in the water, the vessel will undergo a series of tests and evaluations prior to its planned delivery early next year. The launch is one of many steps in the construction process, leading to sea trials and crew training later this year and, eventually, the commissioning of the vessel and commencement of its Coast Guard operations.
The Richard Etheridge will be capable of reaching speeds in excess of 28 knots and is designed to independently conduct many missions, including port, waterways and coastal security; fishery patrols; search and rescue; and national defense. The Sentinel-class patrol boat is equipped with a stern launch ramp that allows the vessel to deploy its cutter boat in a wide range of sea conditions. 
The 24-person crew assigned to the Richard Etheridge will conduct additional testing and evaluation prior to its commissioning in 2012. The cutter will be homeported in Miami and will primarily perform missions to save lives, enforce U.S. and international maritime law, and ensure security in the Coast Guard’s 7th District off the Southeastern coast of the U.S. and in the Caribbean Sea.
The third Fast Response Cutter, the William Flores, is tentatively scheduled to be launched on Nov. 10.
All Fast Response Cutters delivered as part of the Sentinel-class will be named after enlisted Coast Guard heroes. Richard Etheridge became the first African-American to command a life-saving station when the service appointed him as the keeper of the Pea Island Life-Saving Station in North Carolina in 1880. On Oct. 11, 1896, Etheridge’s rigorous training drills proved to be invaluable when the three-masted schooner, the E.S. Newman, was caught in a terrifying storm.  En route to Norfolk, Va., the vessel was blown 100 miles off course and came ashore on the beach two miles south of the Pea Island station. The storm was so severe that Etheridge had suspended normal beach patrols that day. 
But the alert eyes of surfman Theodore Meekins saw the first distress flare and he immediately notified Etheridge.  Etheridge gathered his crew and launched the surfboat. Battling the strong tide and sweeping currents, the dedicated lifesavers struggled to make their way to a point opposite the schooner, only to find there was no dry land.  The daring, quick-witted Etheridge tied two of his strongest surfmen together and connected them to shore by a long line. They fought their way through the roaring breakers and finally reached the schooner. The seemingly inexhaustible Pea Island crewmembers journeyed through the perilous waters 10 times and finally rescued the entire crew of the E.S. Newman.  For this rescue, the crew, including Etheridge, was awarded the Coast Guard’s Gold Lifesaving Medal.
Fast Response Cutters
With the launch of the Richard Etheridge, the Coast Guard's first two Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutters have been placed in the water. The first Fast Response Cutter, the Bernard C. Webber, is in foreground. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

Thursday, August 18, 2011

Navy Achieves $50 Million Savings in Weapons Procurement on Amphibs

The amphibious assault ship USS Peleliu (LHA 5), left, and the amphibious transport dock ship USS Dubuque (LPD 8) are underway off the coast of Pakistan.
Program Executive Office Integrated Warfare Systems announced Aug. 18 that the command has realized a $50 million savings in procuring weapons systems on new construction amphibious ships in fiscal years 2009-2011.
The cost reduction efforts, which started in early 2010, put PEO IWS on track to support the undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics' "better buying initiative" to restore affordability and productivity in defense spending.
PEO IWS generated savings in acquiring combat systems with quantity buys, and not just across amphibious ships. The PEO worked with stakeholders to bundle combat system purchases for LHA 7 and LPD 26 and 27, with other platforms.
"We worked with [participating acquisition resource managers] and other stakeholders to coordinate a single quantity buy," said Capt. Joseph "Ike" Iacovetta, systems integration program manager for amphibious ships. "If you're able to group the buys, you get a reduction. Whether it's going on a destroyer, amphib or a carrier, we all get the reduced cost for the unit."
Cost-avoidance measures were also identified in non-hardware support services, consisting of integrated logistics support, software support and system engineering support. PEO IWS again negotiated requirements to ensure the same combat configuration was maintained across new construction ships to prevent additional costs.
"Applying the same methodologies on cost efficiencies across hulls garnered significant cost avoidances," Iacovetta said. "We were able to recoup those dollars and to get the ship on contract."
PEO IWS is working to establish a systematic approach to apply these cost-saving principles to future acquisitions.
"We meet three times a year with the PARMs to discuss fielding plans and where we're going and our different modernization efforts," said Andrei Sapsai, deputy systems integration program manager. "This is a great forum to discuss schedules, move delivery dates and coordinate funding to procure weapons systems at reduced rates."
PEO IWS, an affiliated program executive office of the Naval Sea Systems Command, manages surface ship and submarine combat technologies and systems, and coordinates Navy Enterprise solutions across ship platforms. 

Construction Commences on Future USS Milwaukee (LCS 5)



Naval Sea Systems Command announced Aug. 18 that fabrication of the future USS Milwaukee (LCS 5), the fifth ship of the littoral combat ship class, has begun at Marinette Marine Corp. Shipyard in Marinette, Wis. 
To pave the way for the start of fabrication, the LCS program office completed an extensive production readiness review Aug. 3-4. 
The ship's design maturity and readiness, the availability of materials and components and the shipbuilder's ability to successfully start fabrication were all closely evaluated. Following the review, the Navy granted authorization for the company to begin construction. 
"Starting construction on the fifth ship of the class is a major step in the life of this remarkable program," said Rear Adm. Jim Murdoch, program executive officer for LCS. "Based on our success in constructing the previous four ships of the class, I am confident we will deliver this ship on schedule and on cost." 
LCS is a new breed of U.S. Navy warship, capable of open-ocean operation but optimized for littoral, or coastal, missions. The Navy remains committed to a 55- ship LCS program and is leveraging competition, fixed-price contracting and serial production to reduce construction duration and costs. In addition, Program Executive Office (PEO) LCS is committed to ensuring that, prior to the start of fabrication, the ship's design is mature and the requirements are well understood. 
Milwaukee is expected to be delivered to the Navy in 2014. The ship will join USS Freedom (LCS 1) and USS Independence (LCS 2), both currently conducting post-delivery tests and trials, as well as the future USS Fort Worth (LCS 3) and USS Coronado (LCS 4), both expected to be delivered in 2012. 
Milwaukee was named in honor of the city of Wisconsin, the state in which half of the class will be built. LCS 5 will be 388 feet in length and will be able to reach speeds in excess of 40 knots. 
PEO LCS, established July 11 and an affiliated program executive office of Naval Sea Systems Command, provides a single program executive responsible for acquiring and maintaining the littoral mission capabilities of the littoral combat ship class, beginning with procurement, and ending with fleet employment and sustainment. PEO LCS designs, delivers and maintains the systems, equipment and weapons necessary for the littoral combat ship warfighter to dominate the littoral battle space and provide U. S. forces with assured access to coastal areas.  

First keel block delivered for new Australian warship



Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare today announced the delivery to Adelaide of the first keel block that will be used to construct HMAS Hobart – Australia’s first Air Warfare Destroyer.
“This is an important step forward in the $8 billion project to construct three new warships,” Mr Clare said.
Construction of the AWDs involves 90 separate steel blocks being built at shipyards in Adelaide (ASC), Melbourne (BAE Systems), Newcastle (Forgacs) and Ferrol, Spain (Navantia).
Three sonar blocks are being constructed in Spain and the United Kingdom.
“Approximately 70 blocks will be shipped to Adelaide over the next four years where they will be consolidated into three new warships,” Mr Clare said.
Over the next six months it is expected that six blocks will be delivered from Melbourne and Newcastle to Adelaide.
This first block weighs around 180 tonnes. It is 18 metres long, 16 metres wide and five metres high and will form part of the keel of HMAS Hobart.
It was loaded on to a barge at BAE System’s Melbourne shipyard on 11 August.
The barge was towed by tug boat to the Common User Facility in Adelaide arriving on 15 August.
Last night it was removed from the barge and transported by a large multi-wheeled vehicle to the pre-fit-out facility.
Further work on the block including blast and paint, fitting pipes, installing communications and electrical cables and fitting internal walls will now be completed.
Two other hull blocks are currently being prepared for shipment from Melbourne to Adelaide.
Construction has begun on all main blocks for the first ship and work has also begun on blocks for the second ship, HMAS Brisbane.
Next year work will begin on blocks for the third ship, HMAS Sydney and the first ship will start to be consolidated in Adelaide.
Mr Clare thanked the more than 1,000 people currently working on the ships across the three Australian shipyards.
In May, the Government announced that the AWD Alliance had reallocated construction work on the project to reduce the schedule risk to both the AWD and Landing Helicopter Dock ship projects.
“The delivery of the first keel block is an important step forward in this project,” Mr Clare said.

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Decommissioning of HMAS Kanimbla


Chris Sattler photo.

The Minister for Defence, Stephen Smith, and Minister for Defence Materiel, Jason Clare, today announced that the amphibious ship HMAS Kanimbla would be decommissioned.
In September 2010 the Chief of Navy imposed an operational pause on HMAS Ships Kanimbla due to seaworthiness concerns. 
Since then, Defence has assessed the future of HMAS Kanimbla.
This included a detailed assessment of the capability provided by HMAS Kanimbla, an assessment of its materiel state and a cost and risk assessment.
The outcome of this assessment is that the most cost effective and lowest risk option is to decommission HMAS Kanimbla.
The cost to complete the extensive remediation work required on HMAS Kanimbla is estimated to be up to $35 million. 
HMAS Kanimbla would not on that basis be available for operations until at least mid-2012.  HMAS Kanimbla was scheduled in any event to be decommissioned at the end of 2014. 
It does not represent value for money to therefore pursue further maintenance on HMAS Kanimbla.
Accordingly, on the basis of advice and recommendations from the Chief of Navy and the Chief Executive Officer of the Defence Materiel Organisation, the Government has agreed to decommission HMAS Kanimbla.
This announcement follows a number of announcements relating to Navy’s amphibious capability in 2011.
In February the Government announced that HMAS Manoora would be decommissioned on the advice of the Chief of Navy that the ship was beyond economical repair to bring it back into operational service, given the vessel’s remaining planned life.
HMAS Manoora was formally decommissioned in May.
The Government also announced in February that it was pursuing the acquisition of the United Kingdom amphibious ship the RFA Largs Bay.  The Government indicated at the time that, should this acquisition proceed, it would consider the decommissioning of the HMAS Kanimbla.
In April the Government announced that it had successfully acquired Largs Bay for £65 million (approximately $100 million). 
Largs Bay will be commissioned into Navy service as HMAS Choules in honour of Mr Claude Choules, the last known veteran to have served on active service in the First World War.
HMAS Choules is expected to arrive in Australia for a commissioning ceremony in Fremantle in December 2011.
HMAS Tobruk
HMAS Tobruk has been docked in Sydney since May while Defence undertakes scheduled maintenance to further assure the safety and reliability of the ship and to return it to 48 hours readiness notice.
Defence has previously chartered the P&O vessel Aurora Australis from May to 12 August to provide a humanitarian assistance and disaster relief sealift response vessel.
HMAS Tobruk is currently in the final phase of its scheduled maintenance period and is expected to be available for sea for a short period of time from end August to early September before it undergoes further scheduled and previously announced work to prepare it for the cyclone season which commences in November.
To provide an amphibious transport capability while HMAS Tobruk is prepared for cyclone season, Defence has negotiated the availability of the Australian Customs Vessel Ocean Protector to provide a humanitarian assistance and disaster relief sealift response vessel from 12 August until 14 October 2011.
The Ocean Protector is in addition to Australia’s agreement with New Zealand that the New Zealand amphibious lift ship HMNZS Canterbury would be made available as part of the joint Pacific-focused Ready Response Force, subject to any operational requirements in New Zealand.
Navy continues to examine amphibious transport ship options from 14 October in addition to HMAS Tobruk in the lead up to the arrival of HMAS Choules at the end of this year.

U.S. Files Lawsuit Against Bollinger Shipyards for Material False Statements Made to the Coast Guard



WASHINGTON - The United States has filed suit in U.S. District Court in Washington, D.C., against Bollinger Shipyards Inc., Bollinger Shipyards Lockport LLC and Halter Bollinger Joint Venture LLC, the Justice Department announced.   The suit alleges that Bollinger, which is headquartered in Lockport, La., made material false statements to the Coast Guard under the Deepwater Program.
The government’s complaint alleges that Bollinger proposed to convert existing 110-Ft Patrol Boats (WPBs) into 123-Ft WPBs by extending the hulls 13 feet and making additional improvements.   As a result of Bollinger’s misrepresentations about the hull strength of the converted vessels, the Coast Guard awarded a contract to convert eight Coast Guard 110 foot cutters to 123 foot cutters.   The first converted cutter, the Matagorda, suffered hull failure when put into service.   An investigation by the Coast Guard and the prime contractor, Integrated Coast Guard Systems, concluded that the calculation of hull strength reported by Bollinger to the Coast Guard prior to the conversion was false.   Efforts to repair the Matagorda and the other converted vessels were unsuccessful.   The cutters are unseaworthy and have been taken out of service.“Companies which make false statements to win Coast Guard contracts do a disservice to the men and women securing our borders,” said Tony West, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Division of the Department of Justice. “We will take action against those who undermine the integrity of the public contracting process by providing substandard equipment to our armed services personnel.”The government’s suit seeks damages from Bollinger under the False Claims Act for the loss of the eight now unseaworthy vessels.   The investigation of the case was conducted by the Department of Justice Civil Division, the Department of Homeland Security Office of the Inspector General and the Coast Guard.  

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group Arrives in 7th Fleet

Download high resolution image.


The John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group arrived in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR) Aug.16.

While in the 7th Fleet, the carrier strike group (CSG) will conduct maritime engagements and port visits to enhance partnerships and promote peace and stability in the region.
“We share enduring partnerships here and appreciate the opportunity for training,” said Rear Adm. Craig Faller, commander, John C. Stennis Carrier Strike Group, “Our Sailors look forward to working together with our partners in the region and sharing in cultural exchanges during port visits.”
The U.S. 7th Fleet AOR spans 48 million square miles, from the International Date Line to the Western Indian Ocean.
The strike group will maximize training with allied nations, highlighting longstanding military partnerships and continued friendships.
The CSG is comprised of USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74), guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53) and Destroyer Squadron (DESRON) 21, which includes guided-missile destroyers, USS Pinckney (DDG 91); USS Kidd (DDG 100); USS Dewey (DDG 105); and USS Wayne E. Meyer (DDG 108).
The embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 9 on board John C. Stennis includes Strike Fighter Squadrons (VFA) 14, (VFA) 41, (VFA) 97, (VFA) 192; Airborne Early Warning Squadron (VAW) 112; Tactical Electronic Warfare Squadron (VAQ) 133; Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 8; Helicopter Maritime Strike Squadron (HSM) 71; and Carrier Logistics Support Squadron (VRC) 30.
John C. Stennis departed from its homeport in Bremerton, Wash., July 25, for a training exercise and its deployment to the 7th Fleet and U.S. Central Command area of responsibility. John C. Stennis’ last deployment to 7th Fleet was in 2009.

Monday, August 15, 2011

DOD Identifies Navy Casualty

ailors bow their heads in prayer during a burial at sea ceremony aboard the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74).

The Department of Defense announced Aug. 13 the death of a Sailor who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
Hospitalman Riley Gallinger-Long, 19, of Cornelius, Ore., died Aug. 11 while conducting a dismounted patrol in the Marjah district, Helmand province, Afghanistan. Gallinger-Long was assigned to 1st Battalion, 6th Marines, Regimental Combat Team 1, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force at Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Delivering the Goods Summer 2011

Saturday, August 13, 2011

Third National Security Cutter, Stratton, Completes Acceptance Trials


August 12, 2011

National Security Cutter
NSC 3, Stratton, gets underway during acceptance trials. Photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries.
The U.S. Coast Guard’s third National Security Cutter (NSC), Stratton, successfully completed several days of acceptance trials that included rigorous tests to ensure the cutter meets all its contractual requirements and is ready for delivery to the service.  Stratton’s acceptance trials were conducted in Pascagoula, Miss., and at sea in the Gulf of Mexico by the Coast Guard and the U.S. Navy’s Board of Inspection and Survey (INSURV).
Acceptance trials are the final significant milestone, or final exam, before the government takes ownership of a new cutter. Representatives from INSURV inspected all of Stratton’s systems, tested its shipboard equipment, examined the quality of the cutter’s construction and evaluated its performance and compliance with the contractual specifications to identify any major deficiencies that need to be corrected prior to delivery.  INSURV indicated that the Coast Guard’s systems are maturing.
“NSC 3 acceptance trials were a very safe and well- executed evolution,” said Rear Adm. Bruce D. Baffer, the Coast Guard Acquisition Directorate’s program executive officer. “We got underway on schedule, successfully demonstrated all contractual requirements and returned three hours early, flying two brooms, signifying a clean sweep of all challenges during at-sea testing. This was a significant step toward providing a new cutter greatly needed by our Coast Guard operators.”
Based upon its findings, INSURV will soon make a formal recommendation regarding the cutter’s acceptance to the Coast Guard. Over the next few weeks, the Coast Guard will work with the shipbuilder, Huntington Ingalls Industries, to adjudicate identified discrepancies prior to Stratton’s acceptance. Stratton is expected to be delivered to the Coast Guard in early September.
Acceptance trials resulted in two starred cards for Stratton, compared to three starred cards for the second NSC, Waesche, and eight starred cards for the first NSC, Bertholf.  Starred cards are discrepancies that must be corrected before delivery or waived by the government.
Stratton’s builder’s trials earlier this summer resulted in no major issues with the cutter’s important command, control, communications and computers systems.  Prior to acceptance, an NSC must pass more than 400 tests, including approximately 60 conducted during sea trials.
The Stratton is named for Capt. Dorothy Stratton, who became the first director of the U.S. Coast Guard Women’s Reserve, known as the SPARs, in 1942. The Stratton is the first Coast Guard cutter sponsored by a first lady and was christened by Michelle Obama on July 23, 2010.
The 418-foot NSC is the flagship of the Coast Guard’s recapitalized fleet and the most technologically capable cutter in the service’s history. The NSC is the first Coast Guard cutter to feature both a small boat stern launch and a helicopter flight deck, and is the only U.S. Department of Homeland Security maritime asset able to protect its crew against biological, radiological and chemical threats.
The first two NSCs, Bertholf and Waesche, have been commissioned and are currently executing Coast Guard missions. The production contract for the fourth NSC was awarded in November 2010 and construction is scheduled to begin at the end of August. The Coast Guard plans to acquire a total of eight NSCs. 

NAMING OF EX RFA LARGS BAY - HMAS CHOULES

13 August 2011
Message from the Chief of Navy
Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Ray Griggs addresses the Choules family and media regarding the announcement of HMAS Choules.
Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Ray Griggs addresses the Choules family and media regarding the announcement of HMAS Choules.
Today at Fleet Base West the Prime Minister and the Minister for Defence announced that the ex Royal Fleet Auxilliary Landing Ship Dock Largs Bay is to commission into the Royal Australian Navy as HMAS Choules.
Many of you will recall that former Chief Petty Officer Claude Choules passed away in May of this year, our centenary year. He died in Perth at the age of 110. This was a significant moment when the world lost its last living link with those who had served in WW1.
Claude Choules was born in England two days after the birth of Australia's Navy in March 1901. Like the ship that will bear his name, Claude started his Naval service in the Royal Navy, in his case in 1916. He came to Australia on loan in 1926 and soon decided to transfer to the RAN. He was a member of the commissioning crew of HMAS Canberra (I) in 1928 and in 1932 became a Chief Petty Officer Torpedo and Anti Submarine instructor.
During WW2 Claude was the acting Torpedo Officer in Fremantle and the Chief Demolition Officer on the west coast. He transferred to the Naval Dockyard Police after the war so that he could continue to serve, He finally retired in 1956.
Portrait  of Claude Choules at HMAS Cerberus in 1936.
Portrait of Claude Choules at HMAS Cerberus in 1936.
In thinking about our past during our centenary year I have been struck by the stories of the tens of thousands of everyday Australians who have made the Navy what it is today. While we honour individual acts of heroism, these others also deserve some form of recognition for their service. In naming the ship after Claude Choules we not only acknowledge his forty years of service in peace and war but the contribution of all who have faced the unremitting hazards of the sea and the challenges of conflict in the last century. The naval service demands endurance and self-sacrifice and, by its nature, much goes unseen. The Navy’s history has included many fierce battles but it is also marked by the patient and devoted patrol, surveillance and escort work which has ensured that Australia and its allies have been able to use the sea to achieve victory. Our sailors past and present have gone about the vital work that we do without fuss or fanfare, often in extreme danger, generally under less than ideal conditions but always with their own unique combination of humour and devotion to duty. Claude Choules, as much as any, epitomises this tradition.
The pennant number of HMAS Choules will be L100, further reinforcing the link to the centenary of the Royal Australian Navy and those who have served in it throughout our history. HMAS Choules will be an exceptional addition to the fleet. The ship will commission in Australia later this year.
Vice Admiral Ray Griggs, AM, CSC, RAN
Chief of Navy 

Friday, August 12, 2011

Russian Navy News


Russian Navy News

RSS
Brazilian Navy's training ship continues visiting St. Petersburg 08.12.2011Brazilian Navy's training ship continues visiting St. Petersburg
Brazilian Navy's training ship continues visiting St. Petersburg

Third frigate for Black Sea Fleet to be laid down in the fall08.12.2011Third frigate for Black Sea Fleet to be laid down in the fall
Third frigate for Black Sea Fleet to be laid down in the fall

Admiral Kuznetsov sailed off for aircraft flight drills08.12.2011Admiral Kuznetsov sailed off for aircraft flight drills
Admiral Kuznetsov sailed off for aircraft flight drills

Black Sea Fleet ships undergo inspection08.11.2011Black Sea Fleet ships undergo inspection
Black Sea Fleet ships undergo inspection

Italian Navy's oldest ship to visit Sevastopol08.11.2011Italian Navy's oldest ship to visit Sevastopol
Italian Navy's oldest ship to visit Sevastopol

Rostelecom takes patronage over Marshal Shaposhnikov08.11.2011Rostelecom takes patronage over Marshal Shaposhnikov
Rostelecom takes patronage over Marshal Shaposhnikov

Producer of cruise missiles rejects intermediary of Rosoboronexport08.11.2011Producer of cruise missiles rejects intermediary of Rosoboronexport
Producer of cruise missiles rejects intermediary of Rosoboronexport

Chinese military delegation visited Northern Fleet08.10.2011Chinese military delegation visited Northern Fleet
Chinese military delegation visited Northern Fleet

Russia works on airfoil craft concept08.10.2011Russia works on airfoil craft concept
Russia works on airfoil craft concept

Rosatom: nuclear subs must be lifted from Arctic seas08.10.2011Rosatom: nuclear subs must be lifted from Arctic seas
Rosatom: nuclear subs must be lifted from Arctic seas

Northern Fleet to pay honors to SSN Kursk08.10.2011Northern Fleet to pay honors to SSN Kursk
Northern Fleet to pay honors to SSN Kursk

First tug-of-war cup was held at Baltic Fleet 08.09.2011First tug-of-war cup was held at Baltic Fleet
First tug-of-war cup was held at Baltic Fleet

Zelenodolsk Shipyard masterfully executes production program08.09.2011Zelenodolsk Shipyard masterfully executes production program
Zelenodolsk Shipyard masterfully executes production program

Makeyev State Rocket Center produced new telemetry system Barracuda08.09.2011Makeyev State Rocket Center produced new telemetry system Barracuda
Makeyev State Rocket Center produced new telemetry system Barracuda

Training ship Brasil calls at St. Petersburg 08.09.2011Training ship Brasil calls at St. Petersburg
Training ship Brasil calls at St. Petersburg

Rescue tug Shakhter returned to Sevastopol08.09.2011Rescue tug Shakhter returned to Sevastopol
Rescue tug Shakhter returned to Sevastopol

Baltic Fleet ships prepare for Open Spirit 2011 exercise08.08.2011Baltic Fleet ships prepare for Open Spirit 2011 exercise
Baltic Fleet ships prepare for Open Spirit 2011 exercise

Russian warship to become BLACKSEAFOR flagship08.08.2011Russian warship to become BLACKSEAFOR flagship
Russian warship to become BLACKSEAFOR flagship

Cooperation & Security 2011 exercise took place in Baltic08.08.2011Cooperation & Security 2011 exercise took place in Baltic
Cooperation & Security 2011 exercise took place in Baltic

Chief of Chinese General Staff to visit Northern Fleet08.05.2011Chief of Chinese General Staff to visit Northern Fleet
Chief of Chinese General Staff to visit Northern Fleet

Sunken Soviet sub found off Estonia08.05.2011Sunken Soviet sub found off Estonia
Sunken Soviet sub found off Estonia

Large ASW ship Admiral Chabanenko completes long cruise08.05.2011Large ASW ship Admiral Chabanenko completes long cruise
Large ASW ship Admiral Chabanenko completes long cruise


1 - 22 of 2042