Wednesday, November 30, 2011

JINSA Presents Henry M. Jackson Distinguished Service Award to Admiral James G. Stavridis


Admiral James G. Stavridis accepting JINSA's Henry M. Jackson Distinguished Service Award from Dr. John Markis of the Behrakis Foundation.Admiral James G. Stavridis accepting JINSA's Henry M. Jackson Distinguished Service Award from Dr. John Markis of the Behrakis Foundation.Grateful Nation Awards presented the same evening
On Monday, November 7, JINSA held its 2011 Henry M. Jackson Distinguished Service Award & Grateful Nation Awards Dinner. For the 29th consecutive year, JINSA honored a leader whose career has been distinguished by the principle that is the foundation of JINSA's work; the belief that the United States requires a strong military capability for both its own security and for that of trustworthy friends and allies. This year’s Jackson Award recipient was Admiral James G. Stavridis, NATO Supreme Allied Commander, European Command and Commander of U.S. European Command.
As a junior officer, Admiral Stavridis first visited Israel in 1980. He said he came away with impressions that remain with him today. Courage, sacrifice, and memory are the words he used to describe the State of Israel. He described how he recently visited the Iron Dome missile defense system and how these kinds of innovations are example of what he believes to be one of Israel’s greatest qualities.
Admiral Stavridis also used Iron Dome as an example of how the U.S. Department of Defense can help with Israeli innovation to make Israel more secure. According to Admiral Stavridis, “I am confident that the United States and Israel will continue to work closely together across the spectrum of national activity…as we continue into this turbulent 21st century, we will work across and even wider spectrum.”
Mr. John Rood of the Raytheon Company, this year's sponsor of the Grateful Nation Award, with the U.S. Marine Corps recipient of JINSA's Grateful Nation Award Sgt. Joseph M. Perez.Mr. John Rood of the Raytheon Company, this year's sponsor of the Grateful Nation Award, with the U.S. Marine Corps recipient of JINSA's Grateful Nation Award Sgt. Joseph M. Perez."One of the great benefits of my job, as the commander of the U.S. European Command," Adm. Stavridis said, "is that I am charged with military-to-military relations between the United States and Israel. I'm fortunate to travel there often .... I learn more about Israel with every visit .... [and I continue to learn when] I can come to this JINSA-sponsored event and have a chance to talk about Israel."
What does the future hold?, Adm. Stavridis asked. "I am confident that the United States and Israel will continue to work closely together across the spectrum of national activity; certainly in the military-to-military venue. But I believe as we continue into this turbulent 21st century, we will work across an even wider spectrum - one that will focus on cyber, on trafficking, on piracy, on smuggling, as well as the traditional threats that we face. I believe the future is bright in every sense - in the context of cooperation and friendship and dedication between the United States and the state of Israel."
Presenting the award to Admiral Stavridis was Dr. John Markis, representing the Behrakis Foundation. In the course of introducing Admiral Stavridis, Dr. Markis noted that, “Admiral Stavridis is the highest ranking Greek-American in the history of the United States military…he is an outstanding American that is dedicated to national security.”
In addition to the Jackson Award, JINSA presented six young military heroes with the Grateful Nation Award for the eighth time since 2003. The honorees represent each of the five branches of the U.S. military and the U.S. Special Operations Command and were recognized for having distinguished themselves through superior conduct in the War on Terrorism. JINSA President David Ganz, Mr. John Rood from the Raytheon Company, sponsor of the Grateful Nation Award,Bob Keats (right) accepting JINSA's National Leadership Award from Maj. Gen. Sid SchachnowBob Keats (right) accepting JINSA's National Leadership Award from Maj. Gen. Sid Schachnow and Admiral Stavridis presented the awards while the crowd of more than 700 heard a recitation of each honoree’s achievements.
The JINSA National Leadership Award was also presented that night. The prestigious award was bestowed upon Mr. Robert M. Keats, an Officer of JINSA's Board of Directors. Mr. Keats was recognized for his 20 years of activity within JINSA, including his service on JINSA’s Executive Board and his steadfast commitment to JINSA’s mission. A humanitarian, philanthropist, American patriot, and an unwavering supporter of Israel, Mr. Keats is most deserving of JINSA’s National Leadership Award. As he told the audience that night, “I serve JINSA because JINSA uniquely links my soul's desire for a safe and secure Israel to my immense pride in America's incredible achievements.”
In his remarks, Admiral Stavridis gave a special thanks to JINSA’s honored guests and extended a heartfelt welcome to the attending family members of the seven Navy SEALs who perished in the August 6 helicopter crash in Afghanistan. JINSA was honored to bring these families to Washington. The seven SEALs, along with others from Naval Special Warfare Command, attended the 2010 dinner to support the family of Grateful Nation Award honoree, Chief Petty Officer (SEAL) Adam L. Brown, who was killed in combat in Afghanistan.
(from left to right) Robert M. Keats, JINSA Officer; Master Sergeant Brendan O’Connor, United States Army; Sergeant Joseph M. Perez, United States Marine Corps; Lieutenant Junior Grade Tyler Haught, United States Navy; Admiral James G. Stavridis, NATO Supreme Allied Commander, European Command and Commander of U.S. European Command; Petty Officer Second Class Timothy Webb, United States Coast Guard; Technical Sergeant Theodor V. Hofknecht, United States Air Force; Staff Sergeant Graham H. Jacobs, USMC (representing the United States Special Operations Command); David Ganz, JINSA President; John Rood, the Raytheon Company.(from left to right) Robert M. Keats, JINSA Officer; Master Sergeant Brendan O’Connor, United States Army; Sergeant Joseph M. Perez, United States Marine Corps; Lieutenant Junior Grade Tyler Haught, United States Navy; Admiral James G. Stavridis, NATO Supreme Allied Commander, European Command and Commander of U.S. European Command; Petty Officer Second Class Timothy Webb, United States Coast Guard; Technical Sergeant Theodor V. Hofknecht, United States Air Force; Staff Sergeant Graham H. Jacobs, USMC (representing the United States Special Operations Command); David Ganz, JINSA President; John Rood, the Raytheon Company.

USS Carl Vinson Strike Group Departs for Deployment


Sailors of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 departed Naval Air Station North Island, Nov. 30, for a scheduled deployment to the western Pacific and U.S. Central Command area of responsibility.
Guided-missile cruiser USS Bunker Hill (CG 52) and guided-missile destroyer USS Halsey (DDG 97) deployed with Vinson as part of Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 1, along with the embarked CVW 17 that includes the "Fighting Redcocks" of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 22, the "Sunliners" of VFA 81, the "Stingers" of VFA 113, the "First of the Fleet" of VFA 25, the "Garudas" of Electronic Attack Squadron 134, the "Tigertails" of Carrier Airborne Early Warning Squadron 125 and the "Red Lions" of Helicopter Anti-Submarine Squadron 15.
The mission of the Carl Vinson Carrier Strike Group will focus on maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts, which help establish conditions for regional stability.
The Carl Vinson CSG will help provide deterrence, promote peace and security, preserve freedom of the sea and humanitarian/disaster response within U.S. 3rd Fleet's 50-million square mile area of responsibility in the eastern Pacific, as well as supporting the nation's maritime strategy when forward deployed.

Acquisition Update: Fast Response Cutter Project Achievements



Fast Response Cutter under construction
The first Fast Response Cutter, Bernard C. Webber, gets underway off the coast of Grand Isle, La.  Photo courtesy of Bollinger Shipyards, Inc.
The Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutter project this week achieved two important milestones in the Coast Guard’s patrol boat recapitalization efforts.
The Bernard C. Webber, the lead ship in the Sentinel class, got underway Sunday for the first time in preparation for builder’s trials, which begin today.  Builder’s trials include both pierside and underway machinery and equipment tests, conducted by the shipbuilder, to demonstrate the seaworthiness and functionality of Webber’s systems, including main propulsion, command and control, navigation and others.  Following the successful completion of builder’s trials, Webber will prepare for acceptance trials, conducted by the Coast Guard, before delivery, which is scheduled for January 2012. 
Fast Response Cutter under construction
The third Fast Response Cutter, William R. Flores, is launched at Lockport, La. U.S. Coast Guard photo.
The third Fast Response Cutter, William Flores, was launched Tuesday at Lockport, La.  Construction of Flores is more than 81% complete.  Flores is scheduled to be delivered to the Coast Guard in summer 2012.  The Flores is named for Seaman Apprentice William R. Flores, who died while saving the lives of his shipmates aboard the USCGC Blackthorn as it sank in Tampa Bay, Fla., in 1980.  Seaman Apprentice Flores was posthumously awarded the Coast Guard Medal for heroism.
Production of the second Fast Response Cutter, William Etheridge, is 84% complete.  Etheridge was launched August 18, 2011, and delivery is scheduled to occur in spring 2012. 

The Original Christmas Tree Ship


History



Captains Schuenemann
The story of the beginning of the Christmas Tree Ship is the story of the Schuenemann family, and most particularly the story of Capt Herman Schuenemann and his last ship, the Rouse Simmons.
In approximately 1885 August and his brother Herman Schuenemann moved to Chicago to seek out their fortune. Chicago’s Harbor was one of the busiest in the world at this time with over 20,000 vessels entering and leaving annually. As competition was fierce, the brothers became excellent businessmen as well as sailors. Although they made a relatively good living, two-thirds of their annual income was generated between Thanksgiving and Christmas with the sale of trees. August had become a truly competitive trader and by 1895 had a well-established reputation as a Christmas tree merchant. In early November of 1898, August was in Sturgeon Bay looking for trees that he would bring to Chicago on a ship named the S. Thal. He purchased 3,500 trees and on November 9th departed with 3 crewmembers for Chicago’s Harbor. A few days later the S. Thal was caught in a horrific storm off the coast of Glencoe, IL and perished. There were no survivors. Herman did not sail with his brother that year, probably due to the birth of his twin daughters in October.

Continuing with the efforts of his and Augusts, Herman now had a business without a partner. Herman sailed further and further north with each passing year. This allowed him to purchase better quality trees at a lower cost but this also made Herman and his crew incur poor and unpredictable weather the further north they sailed. Over the next few years Herman had lost one ship and almost lost another. This triggered him to purchase larger ships (the largest measuring 130 feet long and 26 feet wide.) With the larger and more stable ships, Herman went as far north as the Soo Canal to purchase his trees from the Indians. Eventually, he would hire his own crew to cut and prepare the trees for the journey back to Chicago. In 1910 Schuenemann had established the ” Northern Michigan Evergreen Nursery” whose address was given as the “SW corner Clark Street Bridge.” This allowed him to lower his expenses by selling his cargo directly from the deck of his ship. No longer would Capt. Schuenemann pay laborers to carry trees to store owners and local grocers. He was trying to eliminate as much of the middleman as possible. While Herman sold trees and greens on deck, his daughters worked below by the warmth of the cabin stove making wreaths out of cut greens. In order to even further lower his expenses, sometime between 1910 and 1912 Herman purchased 240 acres in upper Michigan. In salaries for tree cutters, crew, provisions, towing fees and miscellaneous expenses, a single trip would have cost him approximately $3,000. Any failure to return with trees would leave Herman flat broke. In order for Herman to cover all of these expenses as well as make the bulk of his annual income, he now had to transport as many trees as possible with each journey.

Loaded with Trees
By 1911, Schuenemann owned a large vessel named the Rouse Simmons. A ship of her magnitude could carry more than 5,000 trees that were lashed down tightly. The weight of these trees would not become a factor unless they became wet and froze. If this was to happen the weight could now become detrimental to the journey’s success. Schuenemann had the Rouse Simmons recaulked during his passage to Chicago in 1911, but failed to recaulk her prior to leaving Chicago for his 1912 adventure. The neglect to recaulk the Rouse Simmons in 1912 was probably due to financial strains caused by Schuenemann being sued for failure to repay an old debt. The decision not to recaulk the Rouse Simmons would be a fatal one. She was last seen on November 23, 1912, between Kewaunee and Two Rivers Wisconsin, with distress signals flying. Capt. Schuenemann and his crew of 16 went down just 30 miles south of his boyhood home of Ahnapee, Wisconsin. Throughout the years that the Schuenemann’s made their living from the Maritime Christmas Tree business, it rose, peaked and by 1912 was fading. What began as an informal barter system evolved into big business controlled by the high-volume wholesalers. As the railroads and improved highways were now the most efficient way of moving Christmas trees throughout the Midwest, old wooden bottomed vessels became obsolete.

Chicagoans remembered ” Christmas Tree” Schuenemann for at least the next generation. In December of 1934, in the height of the depression, three middle-aged women opened a store on the Near North Side of Chicago. The sign, which brought back many good times and feelings, read CAPTAIN AND MRS. SCHUENEMANN’S DAUGHTERS. Passerby’s entered the store, shared stories of their childhood on the docks and bought the tree they were to display in their parlor. That was the only year that the daughters had a shop. That was probably due to the depression, but it was said that so few people had given so much joy to so many people, as did the Schuenemann family, just for doing their job.

Monday, November 28, 2011

Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group Arrives in 7th Fleet



111010-N-KD852-204

In this file photo, the Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group, consisting of USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52), USS Makin Island (LHD 8), and USS New Orleans (LPD 18) underway off the southern coast of California Oct. 11. (U.S. Navy photo by Chief Mass Communication Specialist John Lill) 
The Makin Island Amphibious Ready Group (ARG) entered the second phase of its scheduled deployment Nov. 27, when the group crossed the international date line and entered the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility (AOR).
The Makin Island ARG is comprised of the amphibious assault ship USS Makin Island (LHD 8), which serves as the command ship for Amphibious Squadron (PHIBRON) 5 and the 11th Marine Expeditionary Unit (MEU), as well as the amphibious transport dock ship USS New Orleans (LPD 18) and amphibious dock landing ship USS Pearl Harbor (LSD 52).
"A key component of the U.S. maritime strategy is building regional partnerships to ensure security, stability and prosperity in the Asia-Pacific region," said Capt. Humberto L. Quintanilla, PHIBRON-5 commander.
Quintanilla said the months of training conducted by the different components of the Makin Island ARG, as well as the ARG-MEU certification exercises, have forged a well-trained three-ship amphibious ready group for a variety of littoral operations.
"The Makin Island ARG is a highly capable group of Sailors and Marines poised to execute various types of combat or disaster relief missions in various regions of the globe," said Quintanilla. "From providing humanitarian assistance during a natural disaster, to ensuring the free flow of commerce, the Makin Island ARG is proof of America's commitment to peace and stability wherever we are needed."
This is the maiden deployment for Makin Island, the Navy's newest amphibious assault ship and the only U.S. Navy ship with a hybrid electric propulsion system.
By using this unique propulsion system, the Navy expects to see fuel savings of more than $250 million during the ship's lifecycle, proving the Navy's commitment to energy awareness and conservation.
The 7th Fleet AOR includes more than 52 million square miles of the Pacific and Indian oceans, stretching from the international date line to the east coast of Africa, and from the Kuril Islands in the north to the Antarctic in the south. 
More than half of the world's population lives within the 7th Fleet AOR. In addition, more than 80 percent of that population lives within 500 miles of the oceans, which means this is an inherently maritime region. 

Friday, November 25, 2011

Russian Navy News


Russian Navy News

RSS
Almaz Shipyard to Launch Patrol Ship Brilliant11.24.2011Almaz Shipyard to Launch Patrol Ship Brilliant
Almaz Shipyard to Launch Patrol Ship Brilliant

Russia Refuses to Sell Arresters for Chinese Carrier11.24.2011Russia Refuses to Sell Arresters for Chinese Carrier
Russia Refuses to Sell Arresters for Chinese Carrier

British Delegation Visited Northern Fleet11.24.2011British Delegation Visited Northern Fleet
British Delegation Visited Northern Fleet

Russian Navy May Waive Lada Class Submarines11.24.2011Russian Navy May Waive Lada Class Submarines
Russian Navy May Waive Lada Class Submarines

SSN Voronezh Passed Modernization11.24.2011SSN Voronezh Passed Modernization
SSN Voronezh Passed Modernization

NF Task Unit Completed Preparations for Deployment11.23.2011NF Task Unit Completed Preparations for Deployment
NF Task Unit Completed Preparations for Deployment

Second Project 636.3 Non-Nuclear Sub Keel-Laid for Russian Navy11.23.2011Second Project 636.3 Non-Nuclear Sub Keel-Laid for Russian Navy
Second Project 636.3 Non-Nuclear Sub Keel-Laid for Russian Navy

Defense Ministry Offers Internet Excursion Onboard Cruiser Varyag11.23.2011Defense Ministry Offers Internet Excursion Onboard Cruiser Varyag
Defense Ministry Offers Internet Excursion Onboard Cruiser Varyag

Serdiukov: All Defense Contracts for 2012 Will Be Signed in December 11.22.2011Serdiukov: All Defense Contracts for 2012 Will Be Signed in December
Serdiukov: All Defense Contracts for 2012 Will Be Signed in December

Yury Dolgoruky to Perform Double Launch of Bulava11.22.2011Yury Dolgoruky to Perform Double Launch of Bulava
Yury Dolgoruky to Perform Double Launch of Bulava

Russian Navy Wants to Get 10 Diesel Subs Till 202011.22.2011Russian Navy Wants to Get 10 Diesel Subs Till 2020
Russian Navy Wants to Get 10 Diesel Subs Till 2020

Medvedev Talks of Arms Imports11.22.2011Medvedev Talks of Arms Imports
Medvedev Talks of Arms Imports

BSF Task Unit Returned from Mediterranean11.21.2011BSF Task Unit Returned from Mediterranean
BSF Task Unit Returned from Mediterranean

Analysts: Russian Defense Science Needs New Control Tools11.21.2011Analysts: Russian Defense Science Needs New Control Tools
Analysts: Russian Defense Science Needs New Control Tools

Medvedev: Defense Industry Will Face Great Reforms11.21.2011Medvedev: Defense Industry Will Face Great Reforms
Medvedev: Defense Industry Will Face Great Reforms

Black Sea Fleet Sums Up Training Year11.21.2011Black Sea Fleet Sums Up Training Year
Black Sea Fleet Sums Up Training Year

Russia to Buy Hydroplanes Be-20011.18.2011Russia to Buy Hydroplanes Be-200
Russia to Buy Hydroplanes Be-200


HMAS Kanimbla farewelled




The last of the Royal Australian Navy’s Amphibious Landing Platforms, HMAS Kanimbla, was decommissioned at her homeport of Garden Island, in Sydney, today.

Kanimbla’s
dedicated service was acknowledged in a traditional ceremony attended by the Chief of Navy, Vice Admiral Ray Griggs, AM, CSC, RAN and past and present crew.

During the ceremony the Australian White Ensign was lowered for the last time and handed to the Commanding Officer, Commander Brendon Zilko, RAN.

“Today represents the closing of a fine chapter in the history of Navy’s Amphibious Fleet,” Commander Zilko said.

“HMAS Kanimbla has provided outstanding service and dedication to duty over her 17 years, actively supporting National and coalition operations spanning from the Western Pacific to the Middle East.”

Kanimbla was the first Coalition vessel to supply urgently needed medical supplies to civilian hospitals in Baghdad.”

“Kanimbla
also undertook numerous humanitarian aid and disaster relief missions providing relief to thousands of people in Vanuatu, Indonesia and East Timor.”

“Today it is also important to acknowledge the hard work of Kanimbla’s past and present serving personnel.  They are the lifeblood of the ship, and Kanimbla’s proud history is theirs. Their dedication is what has allowed Kanimbla to respond to the numerous taskings directed by Government in both war and peace.”

Kanimbla’s successes will be built on into the future with the introduction of the Canberra Class Landing Helicopter Dock providing advanced amphibious capability to Navy.”

“To tide us over until the LHD’s arrive, ADFS Choules will shortly be commissioned, enabling Navy to continue its vital role in the region.”

KDB Mustaed Commissioned



PREVIEWBy Major Norbahrin Muamad
MUARA, Friday 25th November 2011 -  The Royal Brunei Navy (RBN) marked another significant event with the commissioning of a new Fast Interceptor Boat (FIB 25-012) named KDB MUSTAED. The commissioning was inaugurated by First Admiral Dato Seri Pahlawan Haji Abdul Halim bin Haji Mohd Hanifah, Commander RBN who was also the Guest of Honor during the ceremony at the RBN jetty. The ceremony was initiated with the recitation of Surah Al-Fatihah led by the Operations Officer from JAMAAT ABDB, Lt Md. Hishammuddin bin Hj Marzoki.
KDB MUSTAED has a dimension of 27.2 meters in length and 6.2 meters in breadth. The boat was constructed using Aluminium alloy by Marinteknik Shipbuilders based in Republic of Singapore. It is propelled with the Waterjet system, capable of proceeding at a speed of more than 40 knots. The boat has a full complement of 15 crew members, consisting of 3 officers and 12 other ranks. KDB MUSTAED can sustain at sea and is capable of operating in coastal areas and rivers with low water tide levels.
Do’a was cited by the Operations Officer of JAMAAT ABDB on completion of the commissioning ceremony. The climax of the event was the photo taking session with the officers and crew of KDB MUSTAED. Also present to witness the ceremony were Deputy Commanders of Unit Forces, Military and Civilian Directors of the Ministry of Defence, Negara Brunei Darussalam.
The Fast Interceptor Boat KDB MUSTAED is yet another improvement in Force Capabilities for the RBN, in shouldering the roles and responsibilities towards protecting the Nation’s Maritime Sovereignty, in conjunction with the Defence Whitepaper Updated. MUSTAED means Ever Ready. In the military context means Ever Ready in Facing Any Challenges that may come.

Wednesday, November 23, 2011

U.S. Secretary of Defense Visits Electric Boat and Tours Virginia-Class Attack Submarine Mississippi



  DoD photo by Erin A. Kirk-Cuomo

On Thursday, November 17th, General Dynamics Electric Boat (EB) welcomed U.S. Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta to Groton, CT for a tour of the Mississippi, a Virginia-class attack submarine, and a question-and-answer session with over 200 sailors and EB shipyard workers.

In his remarks to the crowd, Secretary Panetta emphasized the essential role submarines play in national defense: “What you guys are doing and the work that you’re doing is absolutely essential to our ability to keep our country safe.”

Panetta also singled out the industrial base, calling the men and women who build our nation’s submarines, ships and other vehicles and weapons systems “the most important element” to our national defense.  He praised the efficiency and performance of the submarine industrial base that has produced ships under-budget and ahead of schedule, saying “Thank you for that.  That’s the kind of partnership that we need.”

“We cannot have a strong defense for the United States without protecting this industrial base.  I need to be able in this country to produce our ships, to produce our submarines, to produce our planes, to produce our fighter planes, to produce our tanks, to produce what we need for the military.  I don’t need to rely on another country; we’ve got to rely on the United States to do that.”

Representative Joe Courtney, whose district includes Electric Boat’s Groton base, was in attendance and released a statement following the Secretary’s visit. “Secretary Panetta recognizes the strategic value and role of our submarine force in meeting our current and future national security priorities,” Courtney said.  “He also shares my belief that maintaining a strong and active industrial base, the likes of which we have right here in eastern Connecticut, is vital to ensuring our country’s continued competitive edge.”

In the coming months your company’s active support and engagement in SIBC activities will be critical to communicate the vital importance of the submarine program to Members of Congress, the media and the public.

Please make plans now to come to Washington, D.C. March 6 and 7, 2012
 to tell your Member of Congress how vital submarines and the industrial base are to jobs and the economy.

To register for the 2012 Supplier Days go to: http://submarinesuppliers.org/supplier/register2012.php.

Tuesday, November 22, 2011

Defender completes her first sea trials


Defender, the Navy's fifth state-of-the-art Type 45 destroyer, has successfully completed her first set of sea trials, with her speed, manoeuvrability, sensors and weapons having been tested over three weeks off Scotland.

Type 45 destroyer Defender
Type 45 destroyer Defender off Greenock in Scotland [Picture: Crown Copyright/MOD 2011]


The £1bn warship is the fifth of six built for the Royal Navy, and following the trials has now returned to the BAE Systems yard in Scotstoun, Glasgow, where she was built.
Thanks to the progress made with her four older sisters - Daring, Dauntless, Diamond and Dragon, all now in the hands of the Royal Navy - her maiden voyage was the shortest of the Type 45 destroyer programme to date.
That said, all the basic functions - if you can ever call Britain's most advanced surface ship basic - needed testing: speed, manoeuvrability, power and propulsion systems, 'domestic services' (galley, laundry, messes and the like), plus weapons systems and sensors.
Now back alongside, further work and testing of systems will continue at the BAE Systems yard while the ever-growing ship's company make best use of their time on the Clyde to forge links with the people of Glasgow.
Defender will be affiliated to the city for the next 35 years and the crew have already started to fundraise for their chosen local charity, the Kelbourne School for the physically impaired.

Some of Defender's ship's company
Some of Defender's ship's company try to stay upright on the flight deck during high speed trials [Picture: Crown Copyright/MOD 2011]

Defender's Senior Naval Officer, Commander Nicholas Boyd, said:
"These are the first steps in getting her awesome capability into service and deploying her in support of UK interests worldwide.
"Our remaining time in Glasgow will be busy; primarily working with BAE Systems in getting Defender ready for acceptance, but it will also allow us to further broaden our formal affiliation to the city, a link that will endure for the next 35 years."
The ship's company have run regular events with BAE Systems' employees, including a couple of race nights and a marathon row along the length of the River Clyde - 176km (or 109 miles).
Money raised from these events was increased thanks to a tuck shop and laundry run by BAE Systems' employees Robert Cullen and Derek Keough, meaning a total of £2,600 was this month shared between the ship's charities and BAE Systems' charity, Erskine Hospital.
As for the ship, she'll return to sea in March 2012 for a second set of trials and is on schedule to make her debut in her future home of Portsmouth in mid-July 2012.
After more trials and training, she'll take her place in the fleet from early 2013.

Monday, November 21, 2011

Japan, U.S. Naval Ships Complete Dynamic Koa Kai Training


The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) helicopter destroyer JS Kurama (DDH 144) performs maneuvers during training as part of the integrated maritime exercise Koa Kai.
111114-N-RI884-296 PACIFIC OCEAN (Nov. 13, 2011) The Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) helicopter destroyer JS Kurama (DDH 144) performs maneuvers during training as part of the integrated maritime exercise Koa Kai. Kurama is participating in Koa Kai to prepare independent deployers in multiple warfare areas and provide training in a multi-ship environment. (U.S. Navy photograph by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Barker/Released)




Hawaii-based Destroyer Squadron 31 completed a week of dynamic training as ships returned to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam Nov. 17-18, from the latest Koa Kai exercise in Hawaiian waters.

It was the first time U.S. Navy ships were joined by a Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) surface ship for a Koa Kai exercise. The JMSDF helicopter destroyer JS Kurama (DDH 144) participated in the exercise that began Nov. 10.

"The Koa Kai exercise provided intense and comprehensive training for all of us," said JMSDF Capt. Shinji Maruzawa, commander, Escort Division 2. "It was remarkable how well we worked together, demonstrating good teamwork and sharing skills. We have great support from our U.S. Navy friends and partners here in Hawaii."

Kurama joined guided-missile destroyers USS O'Kane (DDG 77) and USS Chafee (DDG 90); frigate USS Crommelin (FFG 37); and Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Washington Chambers (T-AKE 11). The surface ships of CDS 31 are joined by assets from Commander, Submarine Force, U.S. Pacific Fleet, Helicopter Squadron Light 37, Commander Patrol and Reconnaissance Wing 2, and the Royal Canadian Air Force 407 Long Range Patrol Squadron.

"This is the first time we've had a Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force ship participate in Koa Kai," said Capt. Dave Welch, commander, Destroyer Squadron 31. "They were a fantastic addition to the exercise. This gives us an opportunity to exercise in another area that our deployed ships deal with, operations with coalition and allied partners."

Hawaii-based surface combatants regularly deploy to the Asia Pacific region and often train with international partners while on deployment. Koa Kai demonstrates the Pacific Fleet commitment to forward readiness and prepares Middle Pacific ships to meet current and future challenges.

"The opportunity to work together gives our crews the chance to see that there is strength in the diversity of capabilities that our allies and partners bring and gives us a chance to work closely with them in a controlled training environment," Welch said. "It also gives our allies confidence in the rigor that we put in our preparations to go forward in deployed areas."

Sailors aboard the JMSDF and U.S. Navy ships participated in visit, board, search and seizure (VBSS) drills; tactical training; anti-submarine warfare and live-fire ammunition exercises; and other drills and training.

"We just returned from major exercise Koa Kai, which translates as 'Sea Warrior' from the Hawaiian language," said Firecontrolman 2nd Class Deborah Rosen, USS O'Kane. "It's a major test of the entire ship's battle readiness. It's challenging. It has to be. It's meant to be. It's designed to be. It's to make sure that we're really going to be ready to go out on deployment and accomplish our mission." 

Units participating in Koa Kai 12-1, the first of two such training events in FY 12, conducted integrated flight operations, anti-surface and anti-submarine training and dynamic ship maneuvers.

Koa Kai supports the U.S. Pacific Fleet's mid-Pacific surface combatant operational employment program, which calls for all Hawaii-based surface combatants to use the strategic location in the Middle Pacific to conduct intermediate and advanced training in a multi-ship environment. The training helps each ship prepare to deploy and respond quickly to support the Maritime Strategy.

Friday, November 18, 2011

Russian Navy News November 18, 2011



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Rogozin: Air Defense Maritime Platforms Must Be Classified As Conventional Arms 11.17.2011Rogozin: Air Defense Maritime Platforms Must Be Classified As Conventional Arms
Rogozin: Air Defense Maritime Platforms Must Be Classified As Conventional Arms

Zvezdochka to Lay Down New Transport Ship for Russian Navy in Dec11.17.2011Zvezdochka to Lay Down New Transport Ship for Russian Navy in Dec
Zvezdochka to Lay Down New Transport Ship for Russian Navy in Dec

Northern Fleet Rescuers Found Cargo Ship Lost in Storm11.17.2011Northern Fleet Rescuers Found Cargo Ship Lost in Storm
Northern Fleet Rescuers Found Cargo Ship Lost in Storm

Sevmash Keeps Working on INS Vikramaditya11.17.2011Sevmash Keeps Working on INS Vikramaditya
Sevmash Keeps Working on INS Vikramaditya

Admiralteyskie Verfi Builds Rescue Ship for Russian Navy11.16.2011Admiralteyskie Verfi Builds Rescue Ship for Russian Navy
Admiralteyskie Verfi Builds Rescue Ship for Russian Navy

Frigate Smetlivy Finished Visit to Augusta, Italy11.16.2011Frigate Smetlivy Finished Visit to Augusta, Italy
Frigate Smetlivy Finished Visit to Augusta, Italy

11.16.2011SSBN Alexander Nevsky Starts Sea Trials in Next Few Days
SSBN Alexander Nevsky Starts Sea Trials in Next Few Days
Storm Inflicted No Harm to Northern Fleet Ships11.16.2011Storm Inflicted No Harm to Northern Fleet Ships
Storm Inflicted No Harm to Northern Fleet Ships

Repair of SSK Kaluga Goes On 11.16.2011Repair of SSK Kaluga Goes On
Repair of SSK Kaluga Goes On

BSF Naval Aviation Paid Honors to Capt Nikolai Khrustalev11.15.2011BSF Naval Aviation Paid Honors to Capt Nikolai Khrustalev
BSF Naval Aviation Paid Honors to Capt Nikolai Khrustalev

Russia to Spend RUR 880 Bln for Arms in 201211.15.2011Russia to Spend RUR 880 Bln for Arms in 2012
Russia to Spend RUR 880 Bln for Arms in 2012

NF Surface Ships Completed Half of Fleet's Training Activities11.15.2011NF Surface Ships Completed Half of Fleet's Training Activities
NF Surface Ships Completed Half of Fleet's Training Activities

Frigate Teg Built for India Continues Trials11.15.2011Frigate Teg Built for India Continues Trials
Frigate Teg Built for India Continues Trials

Cruiser Avrora's Blank Shot Was Fake11.15.2011Cruiser Avrora's Blank Shot Was Fake
Cruiser Avrora's Blank Shot Was Fake

Caspian Flotilla Received New Harbor Tug RB-1011.14.2011Caspian Flotilla Received New Harbor Tug RB-10
Caspian Flotilla Received New Harbor Tug RB-10

Anarchists Fired Avrora's Gun. VIDEO11.14.2011Anarchists Fired Avrora's Gun. VIDEO
Anarchists Fired Avrora's Gun. VIDEO

New PF ship Viktor Faleyev Launched In Vladivostok11.14.2011New PF ship Viktor Faleyev Launched In Vladivostok
New PF ship Viktor Faleyev Launched In Vladivostok

Missile Cruiser Varyag Heads Homeward11.14.2011Missile Cruiser Varyag Heads Homeward
Missile Cruiser Varyag Heads Homeward

Repair of SSN Voronezh Completed 11.14.2011Repair of SSN Voronezh Completed
Repair of SSN Voronezh Completed