Friday, April 27, 2012

Austal USA Joint High Speed Vessel USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1) Completes Builder's Sea Trials



USNS Spearhead (JHSV 1), the innovative high-speed catamaran transport ship under construction by shipbuilder Austal USA in Mobile, Alabama, successfully completed Builder's Sea Trials (BST) on April 19 in the Gulf of Mexico. The trials encompassed over 50 demonstration events that enabled the shipbuilder to rigorously test the ship and all of its systems in preparation for final inspection by the Navy before delivery.
Notable achievements during the trials included a demonstration of major systems along with first-of-class standardization and maneuverability trials, reaching a top speed in excess of 35 knots.
A series of high-speed ahead and astern maneuvers in the Gulf of Mexico demonstrated the effectiveness of the ship’s four steerable water jets. In the course of repeated high-speed turns the ship demonstrated the stability and agility of the catamaran hullform, with the JHSV exhibiting virtually no heeling motions throughout the radical turns.
Upon returning from the full-power trial, Joe Rella, President and Chief Operating Officer of Austal USA, remarked: “The successful first run trials for this prototype vessel validates the quality and reliability of Austal’s shipbuilding know-how. I have never witnessed a more problem-free Builder’s Sea Trial than USNS Spearhead’s. The global Austal organization successfully participated in the design, procurement, and production of this ship with a great outcome, all being accomplished while locally, Austal USA continues to hire new workers and expand our facilities. This is a telltale sign of the dedication of our team of shipbuilding professionals.”


JHSV 1 on the Mobile River


Austal USA is a full-service shipyard offering design, construction and high-speed vessel service and repair. As Austal USA continues to expand its service and repair capabilities, the company is well positioned for new business with engineering, test and trials capabilities, and a new waterfront facility all co-located on the Mobile Bay waterfront.
Austal is currently under contract with the U.S. Navy to build nine 103-meter JHSVs under a 10-ship, $1.6 billion contract and five 127-meter Independence-variant Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) class vessels, four of which are a part of a 10-ship, $3.5 billion contract. 
For the LCS and JHSV programs, Austal, as prime contractor, is teamed with General Dynamics Advanced Information Systems, a business unit of General Dynamics. As the ship systems integrator, General Dynamics is responsible for the design, integration and testing of the ship’s electronic systems including the combat system, networks, and seaframe control. General Dynamics’ proven open architecture approach allows for affordable and efficient capability growth as technologies develop.





Austal has grown into one of southern Alabama’s largest employers with over 2,800 employees on staff hailing from the Mobile Area, Mississippi, Florida, and beyond. Under the current workload, Austal expects to employ over 4,000 Americans by the end of 2013, and will be ready to help the U.S. Navy meet any national security contingency ahead.
Austal is a global defense prime contractor. The Company designs, constructs and maintains revolutionary platforms such as the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) and the Joint High Speed Vessel (JHSV) for the U.S. Navy, as well as an extensive range of patrol and auxiliary vessels for defense forces and government agencies globally. Austal also designs, installs, integrates and maintains sophisticated communications, radar and command and control systems.





Austal benefits from its position as a world leader in the design, construction and support of customized, high-performance aluminum vessels for the commercial high-speed ferry market, an achievement gained over a period of nearly 25 years. 
Austal’s primary facilities comprise a dedicated defense shipyard in Mobile, Alabama; a combined defense and commercial shipyard in Henderson, Western Australia; and a dedicated commercial shipyard in Balamban, Philippines. The Company also provides vessel support services from its facilities in the United States, Australia, Asia, Europe, the Caribbean, and the Middle East.

Rheinmetall receives order from South Korea


MASS naval countermeasures system for LST-II-class ships


The navy of the Republic of Korea is procuring Rheinmetall’s MASS, the Düsseldorf-based company’s state-of-the-art decoy system for frigates, corvettes, minesweepers and patrol boats, for installation on its new Landing Ship, Tank vessels (LST-II). The South Korean Defence Acquisition Programme Administration (DAPA) contracted with Samsung-Thales Co. Ltd. of Seoul to equip the ships. The basis for this is a license agreement between Rheinmetall and Samsung-Thales. Total order volume comes to around €7 million.

As a pilot project, four LST-II-class ships will be equipped with two MASS launchers each. This trainable decoy system is poised to become standard equipment throughout the ROK Navy.

Since the product’s launch in 2002, Rheinmetall has booked orders for MASS from the navies of 11 nations – a total of 186 launchers for 22 different classes of vessels.

 


 


Superior protection with MASS – Multi Ammunition Softkill System


Guided missiles and other projectiles pose a constant threat to civilian shipping and naval vessels alike. MASS protects ships from attacks using advanced, sensor-guided missiles on the high seas and coastal waters as well as from asymmetric, terrorist-type threats. MASS fires decoy rounds which lure incoming missiles away from their intended target.

Fully automatic, the MASS naval countermeasure system offers significant tactical, operational and logistical advantages and can be installed on board any vessel. Moreover, it can be integrated into any command and control system or operated in standalone mode. The MASS system’s innovative, programmable omnispectral rounds assure protection in all relevant wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum (radar, infrared, laser, EO, UV). The system has proven highly effective in various international trials, and is ideally suited to navies with global responsibilities.

Russian Navy News



RSS

Russian Warships Obtain NATO's Navigation Aids04.26.2012Russian Warships Obtain NATO's Navigation Aids
Russian Warships Obtain NATO's Navigation Aids

Seven Yasen-Class Subs to Join Russian Navy by 202104.26.2012Seven Yasen-Class Subs to Join Russian Navy by 2021
Seven Yasen-Class Subs to Join Russian Navy by 2021

FRUKUS 2012 Ships to Visit St. Petersburg04.26.2012FRUKUS 2012 Ships to Visit St. Petersburg
FRUKUS 2012 Ships to Visit St. Petersburg

Yantar Shipyard to Build World's First Skew-Going Icebreaker04.26.2012Yantar Shipyard to Build World's First Skew-Going Icebreaker
Yantar Shipyard to Build World's First Skew-Going Icebreaker

Russian Imperial House Took Frigate Yaroslav Mudry Under Patronage 04.26.2012Russian Imperial House Took Frigate Yaroslav Mudry Under Patronage
Russian Imperial House Took Frigate Yaroslav Mudry Under Patronage

Russia to Shape New Military Doctrine This Year04.26.2012Russia to Shape New Military Doctrine This Year
Russia to Shape New Military Doctrine This Year

Russia to Spend RUR 300 bln for Navy04.25.2012Russia to Spend RUR 300 bln for Navy
Russia to Spend RUR 300 bln for Navy

Ukraine May Denounce Kharkov Treaty04.25.2012Ukraine May Denounce Kharkov Treaty
Ukraine May Denounce Kharkov Treaty

FRUKUS 2012 Planning Conference Held in St. Petersburg04.25.2012FRUKUS 2012 Planning Conference Held in St. Petersburg
FRUKUS 2012 Planning Conference Held in St. Petersburg

Russian Military Admitted Nuclear Threats from Iran and North Korea04.25.2012Russian Military Admitted Nuclear Threats from Iran and North Korea
Russian Military Admitted Nuclear Threats from Iran and North Korea

BSF Hydrographic Ship Donuzlav Arrived in Monaco04.25.2012BSF Hydrographic Ship Donuzlav Arrived in Monaco
BSF Hydrographic Ship Donuzlav Arrived in Monaco

Landing Ship Ivan Gren Prepares for Launching04.25.2012Landing Ship Ivan Gren Prepares for Launching
Landing Ship Ivan Gren Prepares for Launching

Signing of Borei Contract Postponed04.25.2012Signing of Borei Contract Postponed
Signing of Borei Contract Postponed

Victory Day Parade: Three Night and One Final Rehearsals Left04.24.2012Victory Day Parade: Three Night and One Final Rehearsals Left
Victory Day Parade: Three Night and One Final Rehearsals Left

Research Ship Seliger Passes Trials04.24.2012Research Ship Seliger Passes Trials
Research Ship Seliger Passes Trials

BSF Tanker Ivan Bubnov Heading for Gulf of Aden04.24.2012BSF Tanker Ivan Bubnov Heading for Gulf of Aden
BSF Tanker Ivan Bubnov Heading for Gulf of Aden

Frigate INS Teg Handover Ceremony to Take Place on Apr 2704.24.2012Frigate INS Teg Handover Ceremony to Take Place on Apr 27
Frigate INS Teg Handover Ceremony to Take Place on Apr 27

Vyborg Shipyard Assembles Metal Structures for NITKA Simulator04.24.2012Vyborg Shipyard Assembles Metal Structures for NITKA Simulator
Vyborg Shipyard Assembles Metal Structures for NITKA Simulator

BLACKSEAFOR Ships Called in Istanbul04.23.2012BLACKSEAFOR Ships Called in Istanbul
BLACKSEAFOR Ships Called in Istanbul

SSBN Yekaterinburg Returns to Navy in 201404.23.2012SSBN Yekaterinburg Returns to Navy in 2014
SSBN Yekaterinburg Returns to Navy in 2014

Russia to Build 5 Nuc Subs with 20 SLBMs Bulava Each04.23.2012Russia to Build 5 Nuc Subs with 20 SLBMs Bulava Each
Russia to Build 5 Nuc Subs with 20 SLBMs Bulava Each

Russian Navy to Recommission SSBN Verkhoturye in Nov 201204.23.2012Russian Navy to Recommission SSBN Verkhoturye in Nov 2012
Russian Navy to Recommission SSBN Verkhoturye in Nov 2012

US Encouraged Russia's Antipiracy Efforts off Somalia04.23.2012US Encouraged Russia's Antipiracy Efforts off Somalia
US Encouraged Russia's Antipiracy Efforts off Somalia

Corvette Gromky Laid Down at Amur Shipyard to Join Pacific Fleet in 201504.23.2012Corvette Gromky Laid Down at Amur Shipyard to Join Pacific Fleet in 2015
Corvette Gromky Laid Down at Amur Shipyard to Join Pacific Fleet in 2015       

Thursday, April 26, 2012

Saab Receives Order from Thailand Regarding Upgrading of Command and Control System


File:Chakri Naruebet 2001.JPEG
The defence and security company Saab has received an order from the Royal Thai Navy for the upgrading of the command and control system on the aircraft carrier HTMS Chakri Naruebet. The order amounts to MSEK 180.
The contract involve upgrading the aircraft carrier with the latest generation of command and control system, 9LV Mk4. Saab will also supply data-link equipment to the ship, which will allow communication between the ship and the Royal Thai Air Force’s Gripen fighter aircraft and the airborne radar system Erieye, carried by the Saab 340 AEW.
“Saab will further strengthen its position as supplier to the Royal Thai Navy through the upgrade of the command and control system on the Navy's flagship. Saab is now on the Navy's three major vessels and with links to the Royal Thai Air Force's Gripen and Erieye, capabilities and resources can used more efficiently,” says Gunilla Fransson, Head of Saab’s Business Area Security and Defence Solutions.
Saab is the main contractor to the Royal Thai Navy, and as well as supply of its own systems, its tasks will include procurement of third-party systems and responsibility for integration of all existing and new systems.
“This is the second 9LV Mk4 contract signed between the Royal Thai Navy and Saab. It further strengthens Saab's position in the country, which we are proud of,” says Gunilla Fransson.
The contract mainly concerns the Security and Defence Solutions business area as the supplier of the command and control system. The Electronic Defence Systems business area will supply the Sea Giraffe AMB surveillance radar system as well as data-link equipment for communication with Gripen and the Erieye airborne early warning systems.
The contract will run between 2012 and 2015.
Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions ranging from military defence to civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents and constantly develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

Guam Welcomes USS Chicago

The Los Angeles class fast attack submarine USS Chicago (SSN 721) arrives at her new homeport at Naval Base Guam after completing a change of homeport from Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.


Chicago (SSN 721) arrived in Guam April 19 where it is assigned to Commander, Submarine Squadron 15 as one of three forward-deployed submarines. 

Chicago replaces USS Houston (SSN 713), a fast-attack submarine that transferred to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, in January.

Cmdr. Nick Tilbrook, Chicago's commanding officer, thanked attendees for the warm welcome and the support in ensuring a smooth transition. 

"This has been a long time coming," Tilbrook said, "For the last two years, Chicago has been in Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard going through a very demanding maintenance period."

Chicago completed an engineered refueling overhaul in October at the shipyard. While in overhaul, the ship's systems were upgraded to ensure Chicago will be able to meet future tasking being forward deployed to Guam.

"You have joined a small but distinguished group who play a vital role in promoting peace, stability and security in the very dynamic Asia-Pacific region," said Rear Adm. Paul Bushong, commander of Joint Region Marianas, during the arrival ceremony. "Each underway and deployment you make ensures the security of America and its citizens and protects our way of life. Each exercise in that you participate helps strengthen our partnership with regional allies and deters aggression simply through your forward deployed presence." 

Forward-deployed submarines are readily capable of meeting global operational requirements. Guam's strategic location enhances military force flexibility and allows freedom of action, regional engagement, crisis response and deterrence while helping to fulfill commitments to U.S. allies and partners to protect the nation's security.

"I can't think of a better submarine homeport to operate out than here in Guam," Tilbrook said. "The operations out here are fantastic and the people are so friendly. We had a lot of people transfer to the Chicago because they knew the submarine was coming to Guam."

During the arrival ceremony, Capt. Scott Minium, commander of Submarine Squadron 15, emphasized the support of the local community, other commands and the submarines' hometown sponsors in the 721 Club.

"You are the envy of the rest of the submarine force when it comes to hometown support," Minium said. "There is no other organization that has anywhere near the reputation of the 721 Club when it comes to supporting our submarines."

The 721 Club, the successor to the commissioning committee for Chicago, provides support and contact with the crew and families of the submarine. The 721 Club's activities have included contributions and support for the USS Chicago Wives' Club, holiday gifts for all the children of the crew, "ditty bags" of gifts and useful items for all personnel, and sponsorship of an annual holiday party for the officers and crew of Chicago. 

Chicago was commissioned 1986 and is the 34th Los Angeles-class submarine. It is the fourth ship to bear the name of Chicago, the third most populous city in the U.S. 

Tuesday, April 24, 2012

Destroyer Edson to be Donated to Saginaw Valley Naval Ship Museum


File:USS Edson (DD-946).jpg 











The Navy announced April 24 that the destroyer ex-Edson (DD 946) will be donated to the Saginaw Valley Naval Ship Museum, a nonprofit organization, for permanent berthing and public display in Bay City, Mich. 
Formal transfer of title and ownership of ex-Edson to the Museum occurs when the Museum removes the ship from the Navy's custody in Philadelphia, which in approximately two months.
"The Navy is thrilled that Edson has found a new home at the Saginaw Valley Naval Ship Museum," said Capt. Chris Pietras, the Navy's Inactive Ships Program manager. "This ship has served her nation in wartime and peace for more than 50 years, and we're pleased that the ship will continue to serve as a museum and memorial."
USS Edson was launched Jan. 4, 1958, and its first deployment was to the western Pacific in January 1960. It served during the Cold War and was deployed to Vietnam three separate times, during which it earned three Meritorious Unit Citations.
Following its decommissioning Dec. 15, 1988, ex-Edson was donated to the USS Intrepid Foundation in 1989 and served as a museum ship at the USS Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York City from 1989 to 2004. The ship was designated as a National Historic Landmark June 21, 1990. 
In October 2003, the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum formally requested to return ex-Edson to the Navy due to extensive pier repairs that would have rendered the ship's berthing area uninhabitable for an extended period. The Navy accepted this offer, and the ship was again advertised for donation in June 2004.
Two other ships of the Forrest Sherman class of destroyers are on public display. Ex-Turner Joy (DD 951) is owned by the Bremerton Historic Ships Association for public display in Bremerton, Wash., and ex-Barry (DD 933) is owned by the Navy for public display at the Washington Navy Yard in Washington, D.C.
The Navy donates historic ships to promote public interest in the defense of the nation, to commemorate naval history and heritage, and to honor the men and women who built and sailed these ships. 

T-AKE class ship USNS Medgar Evers accepted into Military Sealift Command's fleet


Military Sealift Command accepted delivery of its newest dry cargo/ammunition ship, USNS Medgar Evers (T-AKE 13), during a short ceremony at the General Dynamics NASSCO Ship Yard San Diego April 24th.  

The ship, which was christened Nov. 12, 2011 in San Diego, honors slain civil rights leader Medgar Wiley Evers, who is remembered for his efforts to end segregation at the University of Mississippi in the 1950s and for his opposition to Jim Crow laws in the 1960s.  Since its launch, the ship has been undergoing a series of tests and trials in preparation for its delivery to MSC.

"As USNS Medgar Evers joins the MSC fleet of combat logistics ships today, the food, ordnance and fuel it will provide to the Navy's combatant ships at sea are critical mission enablers for our globally deployed naval forces," said Tim McCully, Military Sealift Command Pacific's deputy commander. "From supporting an aircraft carrier's 75-plus aircraft and 5,500 crew members, to transporting humanitarian assistance and disaster relief supplies, USNS Medgar Evers and more than 30 other MSC underway replenishment ships bring to life the motto: MSC delivers!"

The 689-foot long Evers, designated T-AKE 13, is the 13th of 14 new dry cargo/ammunition ships scheduled for delivery to the Navy by the end of this year. The first 11 dry cargo/ ammunition ships are currently operating as part of MSC's Combat Logistics Force, delivering vital fuel, equipment and supplies to Navy warships at sea. The remaining 3 of the 14-ship T-AKE class are expected to be assigned to maritime prepositioning squadrons, which strategically place combat cargo at sea for rapid delivery to warfighters ashore.

Evers has a crew of 125 civil service mariners working for MSC and 11 Navy Sailors who provide operational support and supply coordination.

T-AKEs are the newest class of Combat Logistics Force ships being built for MSC.  They are replacing some of MSC's aging, single-mission supply ships such as Kilauea-class ammunition ships and Mars- and Sirius-class combat stores ships as they reach the end of their service lives.

MSC operates approximately 110 non-combatant, civilian-crewed ships that replenish U.S. Navy ships, conduct specialized missions, strategically preposition combat cargo at sea around the world and move military cargo and supplies used by deployed U.S. forces and coalition partners.

First AN/SPQ-9B for RAN Delivered


Awd.jpg
Minister for Defence Materiel Jason Clare announced the arrival in Adelaide of the first of three state of the art horizon-search radars for the Hobart Class Air Warfare Destroyers (AWD).
“The AN/SPQ-9B radar is located on the main mast of the destroyers and can track over 200 radar contacts simultaneously with a high level of accuracy”, Mr Clare said.
“It will be used to search and track targets immediately above the sea surface, such as low-flying aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles and missiles.
“The Royal Australian Navy is the first Navy outside of the United States to receive the radar which is manufactured by US company Northrop Grumman.
“It was purchased by the Australian Government through the United States Foreign Military Sales program at a cost of around $10 million each.”
“This is an important milestone in the AWD Project, which involves the construction of three new warships.
“The new ships are based on a proven design from the Spanish Navy. When complete, the AWD will be one of the most capable warships of its size in the world.
“Each AWD will have anti-air, anti-submarine and anti-surface warfare capability as well as the ability to embark a helicopter at sea.
Construction of the AWDs involves the fabrication of 90 separate steel blocks, 30 for each ship, as well as three additional sonar blocks at a number of shipyards in Australia and overseas.
These blocks will be brought together by ASC at the South Australian Government’s Common User Facility in Adelaide where the ships are being assembled.
Five blocks have already been delivered from Williamstown shipyard in Melbourne, with a further 12 planned to be delivered this year from shipyards in Williamstown, Newcastle and Spain including a sonar block for HMAS Hobart (III).
So far this year the gun software and gun weapon systems have been received, and the combat system is currently being tested in the United States.
By the end of 2013, 34 more blocks are due to be completed, work will have begun on the third ship HMAS Sydney (V) and trials of crew training will have commenced.

Failed Equipment, Flawed Designs Plague Lockheed Littoral Combat Ship


Lcs_slide_final
By DANA LIEBELSON

POGO sent a letter today to the Senate and House Armed Services Committees recommending that an expensive and severely flawed variant of the Littoral Combat Ship program be eliminated. The letter comes on the heels of POGO's release of Navy documents revealing serious cracking and corrosion problems with the ship--along with evidence of dangerous equipment failures.  
The Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) is a surface vessel commissioned to operate close to shore. It’s supposed to be the jaguar of Navy ships: fast and agile, with the flexibility to both engage in surface combat with modern-day pirates, and also take down submarines and mines. There are two variants of the LCS: one built by a team led by General Dynamics, which will cost $345.8 million per ship; and the other built by a team led by Lockheed Martin, which will cost $357.5 million per ship.
As we’ve reported, The General Dynamics LCS has some problems with corrosion. But the Lockheed Martin version can hardly even make it out of the harbor. As we wrote in our letter, POGO has obtained a number of documents showing that Lockheed Martin’s USS Freedom has been “plagued by flawed designs and failed equipment since being commissioned, has at least 17 known cracks, and has repeatedly been beset by engine-related failures.”
These are serious problems. "What the documents show is grounds for questioning this LCS variant's viability," says POGO National Security Investigator Ben Freeman. A source close to the program, who blamed the Navy’s Quality Assurance for accepting such a flawed ship, told POGO that this ship is “not fit for combat and should only be used for training [at most].”
In the letter, POGO pointed out that “from the time the Navy accepted LCS from Lockheed Martin on September 18, 2008, until the ship went into dry dock in the summer of 2011—not even 1,000 days later—there were 640 chargeable equipment failures on the ship. On average then, something on the ship failed on two out of every three days.”
According to the documents POGO obtained, in one particularly dangerous example, the ship was involved in counter-drug trafficking operations—which included detaining suspected drug smugglers—when the electricity on the entire ship went out, leaving it temporarily adrift. If this had occurred during combat, this mishap could very well have been fatal.
Imagine if you had to fly on a commercial jet that had equipment failures (like power outages!) most of the time. Not only would you be rightfully concerned for your safety—but how on earth would you get anywhere on time?
Well, the reality is that USS Freedom doesn’t—after more than six months in port, the ship has only been out to sea twice this year, and during both trips the engines and other key equipment failed. This is a far cry from what the Navy has been telling taxpayers: it’s claimed to Congress that both variants of the LCS are performing well.
It’s time for the Navy to fess up that this ship is nothing but a busted, leaky boat with a history of design and equipment failures. With the LCS program expected to cost taxpayers $120 billion, it simply doesn’t make sense to keep this unnecessary vessel.
Dana Liebelson is POGO’s Beth Daley Impact Fellow.

Exclusive: Congressman, LGBT leaders press Navy for a ship to be named USS Harvey Milk


Congressman Bob Filner (D-California) has joined with several prominent LGBT civil rights leaders from San Diego and across the country, calling on the US Navy to name " … the next appropriate ship after Harvey Milk."
The late civil rights icon, Harvey Milk was a Navy veteran who began his service during the Korean War. In Korea, he served aboard the submarine rescue ship USS Kittiwake as a diving officer. Milk was also stationed at Naval Station, San Diego where he was a diving instructor. Milk, whose parents, both also served in the US Navy was honorably discharged at the rank of Lieutenant, junior grade.
The GLBT Historic Task Force (the Task Force) of San Diego County sent an official letter to Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus, last week, requesting that Harvey Milk be considered as the namesake of a naval submarine, carrier or other vessel named "in his honor and memory."
San Diego City Commissioner Nicole Murray Ramirez a longtime gay- and Latino rights activist and chair of the Task Force, announced the launch of a national campaign in partnership with the Harvey Milk Foundation and the International Court System (a charitable services membership organization with chapters in 68 cities.)
The GLBT Historic Task Force is also leading a movement to make San Diego the first city in the US to name a street in honor of Milk. "We in San Diego are very proud that Harvey Milk was stationed in our city and fell in love with California here," said Murray Ramirez, who has served the last five mayors of San Diego. Murray Ramirez was a friend of Harvey Milk in the 1970s and is co-chair of the Harvey Milk Foundation's International Advisory Council.
Acting on behest of the Task Force, Rep. Filner urged top military officials to support the naming of a naval vessel in honor of Milk. In letters to Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus and Defense Secretary Leon Panetta Filner wrote, "I … urge the Dept. of the Navy to name the next appropriate ship after Harvey Milk."
Congressman Filner, whose district is in San Diego, also stated that "this action would be a fitting tribute to Mr. Milk's support for equality, an ideal exemplified in the military's recent repeal of its former Don't Ask, Don't Tell policy." Fittingly, the congressman is past chair and the current ranking member of the House Veterans Affairs Committee.
Harvey Milk's father, William Milk, also served on a submarine during World War II. His mother, Minerva Karns, was an early feminist activist who joined the Yeomanettes, a group agitating for the inclusion of women in the US Navy during World War I.
"We have launched a national letter-writing campaign to the secretary of the Navy whose decision it is when it comes to naming Navy vessels," said Murray Ramirez. On another front, Nicole Murray Ramirez serves as national chair of an ongoing letter campaign that is striving to convince the US Postal Service to issue a stamp in honor of Harvey Milk.
"The US Postal Selection Committee has informed us that Harvey Milk will be put into consideration for the possibility of a stamp in his honor," Murray Ramirez said.
Though he demurred when asked to confirm that he was the conceiver of the ideas to call for a Harvey Milk ship, street and stamp, others had no problem doing so. Murray Ramirez works with Milk's nephew, Stuart Milk and the Harvey Milk Foundation to preserve Milk's legacy and to "also continue his work."
"On behalf of both the Harvey Milk Foundation and the Milk family, it is inspiring to be joined by leadership in San Diego as we work together in support of the naming of a US Navy ship after my uncle, Harvey Milk," said Stuart Milk in a written statement provided to San Diego LGBT Weekly. "As an American hero who proudly wore the uniform of a Naval officer, the naming of a major vessel after Harvey will add that most American value of equality and democracy to the proud message of inclusion for which military service now exemplifies.
According to Stuart Milk, the christening of a ship USS Harvey Milk would boost the military's image, while also boosting a sense of esteem among its gay, lesbian and bisexual members.
"This action by the US Secretary of the Navy will further send a green light to all the brave men and women who serve our nation that honesty, acceptance and authenticity are held up among the highest ideals of our military," Milk stated.
Nicole Murray Ramirez likened Harvey Milk to other civil rights leaders of the 20th Century.
"As a person of color I am proud of the legacy of César Chávez and Martin Luther King," he said. "It's long overdue that Harvey Milk takes his rightful place in the history of our great nation."
In 2009, Harvey Milk was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Milk was further enshrined in officialdom when the state of California designated May 22 "Harvey Milk Day." Milk was also inducted into the California Hall of Fame.
"I urge all Americans to write to the secretary of the Navy, Ray Mabus and urge him to name a ship after Harvey Milk," said Murray Ramirez.
Letters should be sent to, The Honorable Ray Mabus, Secretary of the Navy, The Pentagon, Washington, D.C. 203501-001. Commissioner Nicole Murray Ramirez especially urged Milk's fellow LGBT veterans to write to the secretary.
San Diego LGBT Weekly is the only weekly magazine serving the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community in America's Finest City. The organization's mission is to inform and entertain the San Diego LGBT community with news and information that is of interest to and affects the lives of the 200,000 LGBT community members in San Diego.

Monday, April 23, 2012

Raytheon to upgrade US Navy's 20-year-old analog air traffic control radars with modern, digital technology


The DoD/FAA's ASR-11 DASR is the next generation solid-state, terminal area air traffic control radar.

Primary Surveillance Radar (PSR) coverage to 60 miles, and Monopulse Secondary Surveillance Radar (MSSR) coverage to 120 miles. The system meets all current FAA, DoD, ICAO, and Eurocontrol surveillance requirements. DASR is highly modular and readily re-configurable. It is designed for unattended operation using redundant subsystems with built-in test equipment and can be fully controlled and monitored from multiple locations.







The U.S. Navy has purchased two more radar systems from Raytheon Company  as part of a continuing effort to replace outdated analog air traffic control systems with digital technology. The new radars will be installed at military bases in New River, N.C., and Quantico, Va.
The Digital Airport Surveillance Radar (DASR) ASR-11 is the first fully digital, solid-state radar to be implemented in the U.S. National Airspace System (NAS). The radars have been deployed to more than 130 sites throughout the world, and will eventually be in more than 150 sites total.
The ASR-11 provides primary surveillance radar coverage up to 60 miles and secondary surveillance radar coverage up to 120 miles. It provides the air traffic controller with improved aircraft detection, lower support costs and better weather display. The primary radar is being manufactured in Waterloo, Canada, while the secondary radar will be made in the United States and United Kingdom.
"This radar technology is raising the bar even higher on safety," said Mike Prout, vice president of Security and Transportation Systems for Raytheon's Network Centric Systems business. "Our radars will help controllers maintain safety in an increasingly busy airspace."
Analog radars are steadily being replaced as part of the NAS Modernization Program, which involves upgrading legacy air traffic control systems with modern digital technology to enable the Navy to keep pace with changing Federal Aviation Administration guidelines and standards for terminal radar approach controls.
The digital radar is also an integral part of Raytheon's recently introduced Mobile Air Traffic Control system, which provides critical air traffic services when existing infrastructure has been damaged or does not exist.

Russian Navy News



RSS

Northern Fleet Marines Ready for Polar Engagement04.20.2012Northern Fleet Marines Ready for Polar Engagement
Northern Fleet Marines Ready for Polar Engagement

SSBN Vladimir Monomakh Prepares for Electrification04.20.2012SSBN Vladimir Monomakh Prepares for Electrification
SSBN Vladimir Monomakh Prepares for Electrification

Baltic Fleet Doctors Saved Family  04.20.2012Baltic Fleet Doctors Saved Family
Baltic Fleet Doctors Saved Family

Baltiysky Zavod Authorized to Build Underbody for Mistrals04.20.2012Baltiysky Zavod Authorized to Build Underbody for Mistrals
Baltiysky Zavod Authorized to Build Underbody for Mistrals

Moscow, Kiev Talked Over "Contractual Basis" Of Black Sea Fleet Deployment04.19.2012Moscow, Kiev Talked Over "Contractual Basis" Of Black Sea Fleet Deployment
Moscow, Kiev Talked Over "Contractual Basis" Of Black Sea Fleet Deployment

Brunei Displayed Interest in Russian Arms04.19.2012Brunei Displayed Interest in Russian Arms
Brunei Displayed Interest in Russian Arms

Rosoboronexport Explained Growing Russian Arms Exports04.19.2012Rosoboronexport Explained Growing Russian Arms Exports
Rosoboronexport Explained Growing Russian Arms Exports

Russia, Ukraine Completes Planning of Fairway of Peace 2012 Exercise04.19.2012Russia, Ukraine Completes Planning of Fairway of Peace 2012 Exercise
Russia, Ukraine Completes Planning of Fairway of Peace 2012 Exercise

INS Vikramaditya Prepares for Taking Sea04.19.2012INS Vikramaditya Prepares for Taking Sea
INS Vikramaditya Prepares for Taking Sea

Russian Missile Systems Attracted African and Asian Customers04.19.2012Russian Missile Systems Attracted African and Asian Customers
Russian Missile Systems Attracted African and Asian Customers

Missile Cruiser Petr Veliky Turned 1404.19.2012Missile Cruiser Petr Veliky Turned 14
Missile Cruiser Petr Veliky Turned 14

BLACKSEAFOR Continues Joint Activities at Sea04.18.2012BLACKSEAFOR Continues Joint Activities at Sea
BLACKSEAFOR Continues Joint Activities at Sea

Zelenodolsk Shipyard to Lay Down New Grachonok Counter-Terror Craft on May 504.18.2012Zelenodolsk Shipyard to Lay Down New Grachonok Counter-Terror Craft on May 5
Zelenodolsk Shipyard to Lay Down New Grachonok Counter-Terror Craft on May 5

Caspian Flotilla Prepares for Deployment04.18.2012Caspian Flotilla Prepares for Deployment
Caspian Flotilla Prepares for Deployment

Indonesia to Buy Russian BMP Fighting Vehicles for $100 Mln 04.18.2012Indonesia to Buy Russian BMP Fighting Vehicles for $100 Mln
Indonesia to Buy Russian BMP Fighting Vehicles for $100 Mln

Russia Excelled France at Defense Spendings, First in 18 Years04.18.2012Russia Excelled France at Defense Spendings, First in 18 Years
Russia Excelled France at Defense Spendings, First in 18 Years

Russian, German Military Met in Central Naval Museum04.17.2012Russian, German Military Met in Central Naval Museum
Russian, German Military Met in Central Naval Museum

Pacific Fleet Pays Honors to Corvette Musson Wrecked 25 Years Ago04.17.2012Pacific Fleet Pays Honors to Corvette Musson Wrecked 25 Years Ago
Pacific Fleet Pays Honors to Corvette Musson Wrecked 25 Years Ago

Sechin Recommended USC to Reduce Prices for Borei Subs04.17.2012Sechin Recommended USC to Reduce Prices for Borei Subs
Sechin Recommended USC to Reduce Prices for Borei Subs

Grachonok to Join Black Sea Fleet on May 704.17.2012Grachonok to Join Black Sea Fleet on May 7
Grachonok to Join Black Sea Fleet on May 7

Russia Developed New-Generation Naval Missiles04.17.2012Russia Developed New-Generation Naval Missiles
Russia Developed New-Generation Naval Missiles

Caspian Flotilla to Receive Corvette Makhachkala in 201204.17.2012Caspian Flotilla to Receive Corvette Makhachkala in 2012
Caspian Flotilla to Receive Corvette Makhachkala in 2012

BLACKSEAFOR Ships Arrived in Sevastopol04.16.2012BLACKSEAFOR Ships Arrived in Sevastopol
BLACKSEAFOR Ships Arrived in Sevastopol

Turkish Task Unit Pays Unofficial Visit to Novorossiysk04.16.2012Turkish Task Unit Pays Unofficial Visit to Novorossiysk
Turkish Task Unit Pays Unofficial Visit to Novorossiysk

Landing Ship Georgy Pobedonosets Held Debarkation Drill04.16.2012Landing Ship Georgy Pobedonosets Held Debarkation Drill
Landing Ship Georgy Pobedonosets Held Debarkation Drill

Destroyer Vice Admiral Kulakov Heads for Cork, Ireland04.16.2012Destroyer Vice Admiral Kulakov Heads for Cork, Ireland
Destroyer Vice Admiral Kulakov Heads for Cork, Ireland

Patrol Ship Zhemchug to Set Afloat in April04.16.2012Patrol Ship Zhemchug to Set Afloat in April
Patrol Ship Zhemchug to Set Afloat in April

Pacific Fleet Mariners Prepare for Russian-Chinese Exercise04.16.2012Pacific Fleet Mariners Prepare for Russian-Chinese Exercise
Pacific Fleet Mariners Prepare for Russian-Chinese Exercise