Wednesday, May 30, 2012

World Oceans Day Festival - June 8th to the 10th



Join the Maritime Museum of BC and Ocean Networks Canada as we partner with businesses and community organizations within the Inner Harbour and surrounding areas for our first annual World Oceans Day Festival, June 8th -10th.  

Lots of exciting hands-on activities are planned for kids, as well as a lively outdoor exhibition featuring organizations that are actively involved with our oceans. 
World Fisheries Trust , CETUS society, Fisheries and Oceans Canada,  and SeaChange all plan to be there, and the list continues to grow! A special afternoon speaker series will offer short talks from top marine researchers and graduate students on leading edge marine projects. There will be an art contest showcasing the beautiful images and video from researchers who are studying our blue planet. We will discover our impact on this fragile ecosystem, how we are helping it and how it sustains our everyday life. This event is free and will be open to the public June 9th and 10th from 11am-5pm outside in beautiful Bastion Square and inside at the Maritime Museum of BC. 

Monday, May 28, 2012

DOD Identifies Navy Casualty



              The Department of Defense announced today the death of a sailor who was supporting Operation Enduring Freedom.
             Hospitalman Eric D. Warren, of Shawnee, Okla., died May 26 of wounds received in action due to an improvised explosive device blast in Sangin District, Helmand Province, Afghanistan.  He was assigned to 1st Battalion, 8th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 6, 1st Marine Division (Forward), I Marine Expeditionary Force (Forward), Camp Lejeune, N.C.

Friday, May 25, 2012

Russian Navy News



RSS
05.24.2012Media: Russian Navy to Purchase Twin Sister for Ivan Gren Landing Ship
Media: Russian Navy to Purchase Twin Sister for Ivan Gren Landing Ship
Details of New Russian Missile Trials Leaked Out05.24.2012Details of New Russian Missile Trials Leaked Out
Details of New Russian Missile Trials Leaked Out

Russo-Dutch Talks Held in Navy Main HQ05.23.2012Russo-Dutch Talks Held in Navy Main HQ
Russo-Dutch Talks Held in Navy Main HQ

Defense Ministry to Sign Borei Contract on May 2505.23.2012Defense Ministry to Sign Borei Contract on May 25
Defense Ministry to Sign Borei Contract on May 25

Russian Navy Commander: Baltic Fleet Will Continue Full-Scale Developing 05.23.2012Russian Navy Commander: Baltic Fleet Will Continue Full-Scale Developing
Russian Navy Commander: Baltic Fleet Will Continue Full-Scale Developing

Northern Eagle 2012 Planning Conference Kicks Off in Murmansk05.23.2012Northern Eagle 2012 Planning Conference Kicks Off in Murmansk
Northern Eagle 2012 Planning Conference Kicks Off in Murmansk

FRUKUS-2012 Final Planning Conference Takes Place in St. Petersburg05.22.2012FRUKUS-2012 Final Planning Conference Takes Place in St. Petersburg
FRUKUS-2012 Final Planning Conference Takes Place in St. Petersburg

God's Predestination Prepares for Launching 05.22.2012God's Predestination Prepares for Launching
God's Predestination Prepares for Launching

First Russo-Belarusian Military Partnership Conference Held in Minsk05.22.2012First Russo-Belarusian Military Partnership Conference Held in Minsk
First Russo-Belarusian Military Partnership Conference Held in Minsk

Vladimir Putin Arrives in Severodvinsk to Inspect INS Vikramaditya Taking Sea05.22.2012Vladimir Putin Arrives in Severodvinsk to Inspect INS Vikramaditya Taking Sea
Vladimir Putin Arrives in Severodvinsk to Inspect INS Vikramaditya Taking Sea

Pacific Fleet Celebrated 281-th Birthday05.21.2012Pacific Fleet Celebrated 281-th Birthday
Pacific Fleet Celebrated 281-th Birthday

Sea Trials of INS Vikramaditya Can Be Postponed05.21.2012Sea Trials of INS Vikramaditya Can Be Postponed
Sea Trials of INS Vikramaditya Can Be Postponed

Source: No Chance to Sign Contracts on Borei and Yasen Subs05.21.2012Source: No Chance to Sign Contracts on Borei and Yasen Subs
Source: No Chance to Sign Contracts on Borei and Yasen Subs

Russian Destroyer Smetlivy Stays Off Syria05.21.2012Russian Destroyer Smetlivy Stays Off Syria
Russian Destroyer Smetlivy Stays Off Syria

Russian Navy Ordered First Batch of Ka-27M Shipborne Helicopters05.21.2012Russian Navy Ordered First Batch of Ka-27M Shipborne Helicopters
Russian Navy Ordered First Batch of Ka-27M Shipborne Helicopters

Yantar Shipyard to Start Building New Frigates for India in 201205.21.2012Yantar Shipyard to Start Building New Frigates for India in 2012
Yantar Shipyard to Start Building New Frigates for India in 2012       

Thursday, May 24, 2012

Newport News Shipbuilding Celebrates Construction Milestone on Aircraft Carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78)

Huntington Ingalls Industries announced today that its Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) division reached a construction milestone by lowering the final keel section of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78) into place. Local media were invited to NNS to watch as the 680-metric-ton lower bow unit was joined to the other keel sections in the dry dock.

"The lower bow is a distinctive component of an aircraft carrier," said Rolf Bartschi, NNS' vice president of CVN 78 carrier construction. "Its sheer size is indicative of the massive undertaking of this project and the incredible work ethic of the shipbuilders bringing Ford to life. I congratulate the team on yet another major construction milestone."
Gerald R. Ford is being built using modular construction, a process where smaller sections of the ship are welded together to form large structural units, outfitting is installed, and the large unit is lifted into the dry dock. Of the nearly 500 total structural lifts needed to complete the ship, 390 have been accomplished.
Comprising six steel sections, the lower bow is more than 60 feet tall and is one of the heaviest superlifts to be placed on the ship. Construction of the lower bow superlift, the last major section of the ship below the waterline, began last year.
Gerald R. Ford represents the next-generation class of aircraft carriers. The first-in-class ship features a new nuclear power plant, a redesigned island, electromagnetic catapults, improved weapons movement, an enhanced flight deck capable of increased aircraft sortie rates, and growth margin for future technologies and reduced manning. The keel for Ford was laid in November 2009. The ship is on track to meet its scheduled launch in 2013 and delivery to the U.S. Navy in 2015.

Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Newport News Shipbuilding Achieves Major Construction Milestone on Virginia-Class Submarine Minnesota


Huntington Ingalls Industries announced today that the Virginia-class submarine Minnesota (SSN 783) is "pressure hull complete," signifying that all of the submarine's hull sections have been joined to form a single, watertight unit. Minnesota will be the 10th Virginia-class submarine and the fifth delivered by HII's Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS) division.
"This is a key milestone in the construction of the submarine," said Jim Hughes, NNS' vice president of submarines and fleet support. "Our shipbuilders and our partners at Electric Boat have put a lot of hard work into this boat, and it shows. Construction progress on Minnesota is two months ahead of where USS California, the last Virginia-class submarine delivered by NNS, was at pressure hull complete. The accelerated progress is due to an increase in work prior to hull completion in a more cost-efficient environment, resulting in a reduction in both the time and cost to complete the work."
Pressure hull complete is the last major milestone before the submarine's christening this fall and delivery in 2013. The contract to build Minnesota was awarded in 2003, and construction began in February 2008 under a teaming arrangement between NNS and General Dynamics Electric Boat.Minnesota is 81 percent complete.
"This is a great day for Minnesota," said Cmdr. John Fancher, Minnesota's commanding officer. "The pride and professionalism of the shipbuilders evident in their workmanship energizes us. Minnesota's construction process has been an amazing experience already as nothing more than pieces of metal are transformed into a monument of technology. Every day, you can sense the anticipation and energy building within the crew as we step toward eventually taking this great warship to sea. We can't wait!"

Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Rolls-Royce selected to provide propulsion equipment to the Turkish Navy



Rolls-Royce, the global power systems company, has won an order to supply propulsion equipment for three new ships commissioned by the Turkish Navy.
Istanbul Shipyard will design and build one Submarine Rescue Mother Ship (MOSHIP) and two Rescue and Towing Ships at their yard in Tuzla. Rolls-Royce will supply tunnel thrusters and retractable thrusters for all three vessels. In additionRolls-Royce Azipull main propulsion thrusters will be supplied for the MOSHIP.
This is the first order for thrusters that Rolls-Royce has received from the Turkish Navy, which is planning a significant ship building programme in the coming years.
Sam Cameron, Rolls-Royce, Senior Vice President - Naval Sales and Business Development said: “The Turkish Navy is an important customer, with whom we have a strong relationship. Our technology is particularly well suited to naval applications and we look forward to developing the relationship with both the Istanbul Shipyard and the Turkish Navy in the future.”
Rolls-Royce supplies seventy navies around the world and has previously supplied controllable pitch propellers and sonar handling systems to the Turkish Navy.
Azipull thrusters rotate through 360 degrees and can propel the ship in any direction offering high manoeuvrability, without the need for a rudder. This technology enables vessels to hold their position more effectively, which is especially important for vessels carrying out search and rescue missions.

Monday, May 21, 2012

How to Break the Deadlock on Iran’s Nuclear Impasse: New Report from Oxford Research Group (ORG)


London, 21 May 2012
  • A deal can be done, in the upcoming Baghdad talks on Iran’s nuclear programme.
  • The mood has shifted and has become potentially more amenable to compromise.
  • An understanding has already been reached on both sides to the principle of reciprocity.
  • New report from Oxford Research Group examines how a deal can be reached.
A new report by Oxford Research Group (ORG) analyses how the deadlock over Iran’s controversial nuclear programme could be overcome. It identifies the key principles for reaching a deal in the nuclear talks, involving the Director of the IAEA, on Monday 21 May, and in the crucial negotiations on Wednesday 23 May in Baghdad between Iran and the six E3+3 states (US, UK, China, Russia, France and Germany).
Turning this into a comprehensive agreement will not be easy. “For a deal to be done, negotiations will need to be held without preconditions”, argues ORG in its new report, ‘Iran’s Nuclear Impasse: Breaking the Deadlock’(1).
ORG recently engaged in a series of confidential consultations with a group of individuals close to the decision-making process on the Iranian nuclear file, with the aim of coming up with a workable and realistic solution. Gabrielle Rifkind, Director of ORG’s Middle East programme, and report Co-Author, said, “The impasse will not easily be broken after 30 years of acrimony. But our consultations have clarified that there are sufficient areas of agreement that would allow for a successful negotiation between Iran and the West that would prevent Iran from becoming a nuclear weapon state.”
The report follows talks in Istanbul between Iran and the E3+3 on 14 April, and talks at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) last week. It gives a detailed account of the key obstacles the respective parties face at the upcoming Baghdad talks, and attempts to provide real solutions for overcoming the missteps and failures of past attempts at breaking the deadlock. It identifies a set of tangible steps on the conduct, structure and sequencing of negotiations for talks to be successful, for example:
  • Iran’s legitimate rights to enrichment will need to be recognised.
  • Iran will have to demonstrate to the complete satisfaction of the IAEA that it has foresworn all research and activities pertaining to the weaponisation of its nuclear programme.
  • The political endgame has to be agreed from the outset, foregoing short-term tactical gains.
  • A “balance of advantage” has to be created; the negotiations need to be phased and incentivised for all parties to “win“ at each successive phase of the negotiations.
  • Building trust between Iran and the E3+3 states is key and Iran needs to be reintegrated into the regional security architecture.
  • The importance of a parallel process of ‘Track II’ talks to complement the negotiations, involving respected figures to try to overcome the climate of mistrust.
Gabrielle Rifkind said: “While talk of a “grand bargain” is premature and untenable at the present time, a comprehensive solution to the Iranian nuclear file is possible, and crucial for regional and international security. There is cautious optimism emerging from the preparatory talks as the mood has shifted. An understanding has now been reached on both sides to the principle of reciprocity and addressing mutual security concerns. However, it will take time to create a climate, in which the motives of the other are not viewed with suspicion and mistrust, and which is why an additional process of talks to support the official negotiations is vital.”
Prof Paul Rogers, ORG’s Global Security Consultant, said: “Successful negotiations are indispensable, as the consequences of a conflict with Iran would have a devastating effect. However difficult, other ways must be found to resolve the Iranian nuclear crisis.”
(1) Notes:
The Report is co-authored by Gabrielle Rifkind, ORG’s Middle East Programme Director; Eskandar Sadeghi-Boroujerdi, Researcher on ORG’s Iran Project; and Paul Ingram, Director of the British American Security Information Council (BASIC).
ORG has been working on the Iran nuclear issues for six years and has produced widely quoted briefings and reports. For more information, read: ‘Military Action Against Iran: Impact and Effects’ (2010) and ‘Iran: Consequences of a War’ (2006), both by Paul Rogers, and ‘Talking to the Enemy: Creating New Structures for Negotiations’ (2011) by Gabrielle Rifkind.

US Navy awards Submarine Escape Suits contract to Survitec

Survitec Group is delighted to announce it has agreed to an initial equipment order worth over $25 million to supply Submarine Escape Immersion Equipment (SEIE) to the US Navy. This firmly places Survitec´s RFD Beaufort Mk11 suit as the only technically acceptable product to meet the strict US Navy requirements for product quality and submariner safety.
The initial order for several thousand RFD Beaufort SEIE Mk11 suits has the opportunity to extend to a total contract value of over $60 million over the next five years. This success follows the recent contract award from the Royal Canadian Navy, also for the SEIE Mk11 suit, and reinforces Survitec´s commitment to safety, integrity and product quality.
Manufactured at Survitec´s facility in Sharon Center, Ohio, the SEIE Mk11 suits will replace the US Navy´s existing SEIE Mk10 range. Survitec has already invested approximately $10 million in establishing an extensive and highly capable US manufacturing facility capable of achieving full rate production, and in sourcing US domestic textiles necessary to comply with the Preference for Certain Domestic Commodities Clause, otherwise referred to as the Berry Amendment.
David Abbott, Managing Director of Survitec´s Sharon Center facility, commented on the contract, "We´re extremely proud to be supplying our US Navy Submariners in what is a very important contract for Survitec and our workforce in Sharon Center. Our company pioneered Submarine Escape technology in 1952 and has continually evolved its offering to the current high standard of the SEIE Mk11."
The Sharon Center facility, now employing over 120 local, skilled workers in high-end textile engineering and manufacturing has already supplied in excess of 4,500 SEIE Mk11 suits since 2009, and will continue production of around 250 units per month. The facility is also the supplier of 25- and 50-person rafts to the US Navy (NAVSEA), and Anti-G pants for pilots in the US Air Force and US Navy.
Survitec pioneered the development of Submarine Escape technology in 1952. Designed to provide protection for submariners from a stricken submarine, Survitec´s products include single skinned suits with integrated life rafts, escape jerkins, inflatable abandonment suits, external submarine life raft systems and freeboard extenders.
The suits are designed at Survitec Group´s center of excellence for engineering and, test and certification of mission critical safety and survival equipment in Birkenhead, UK. Survitec has in excess of 30,000 units of submarine escape equipment in use in the market place, and supplies to 30 of the world´s navies.

Lockheed Martin's Aegis Computer Program Development Approved by U.S. Navy for Australian Warfare Destroyer



Lockheed Martin has completed computer program development and testing for the HOBART class Air Warfare Destroyer (AWD), the Royal Australian Navy's Aegis-equipped ships. The computer programs have been approved by the U.S. Navy.
Tests were conducted over a two-week period at the Navy's land-based test facility, the Vice Admiral James H. Doyle Combat Systems Engineering Development Site in New Jersey.
"The Aegis Weapon System enables navies around the world to protect their citizens and their nations from continuously evolving threats," said Doug Wilhelm, director of international Aegis programs for Lockheed Martin's Mission Systems & Sensors business. "We look forward to working with the U.S and allied navies to continue to provide proven anti-air warfare capability on a global scale."
The HOBART class will be capable of simultaneous operations in a multi-warfare environment, including anti-air, anti-surface, anti-submarine and naval gunfire support roles.
Lockheed Martin is a leader in combat systems integration and the development of integrated air and missile defense systems and technologies. Manufacturing work for this program will occur in Moorestown, N.J.
In addition to the U.S. and Australian navies, Aegis is also the weapon system for the navies of Japan, Norway, the Republic of Korea and Spain. The 100 Aegis-equipped ships in service around the globe have more than 1,250 years of at-sea operational experience and have launched more than 3,800 missiles in tests and real-world operations.

Sunday, May 20, 2012

Pilot Killed in Mk -58 Hawker Hunter Mishap Supporting US Military Training


ATAC Aircraft: MK-58 Hawker Hunter
Thomas "TC" Bennett, ATAC Hawker Hunter pilot and retired Naval Aviator, was killed in a plane crash on the afternoon of May 18th, 2012 when his Mk-58 Hawker Hunter crashed near Naval Base Ventura County, California while attempting to land; he was 57.  Investigators from the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the US Navy (USN) are currently investigating the cause of the accident. "We are committed to ensuring we investigate and understand the cause of this mishap to prevent further incidents, but will first focus all our efforts on the family and their well-being," said Jeff Parker.
TC was originally from East Liverpool, Ohio joining the Navy in June of 1976, flying tactical jet aircraft for 27 years ultimately retiring at the rank of Captain.  CAPT Bennett's last duty as Carrier Air Wing Commander 11 was leading the first strike into Afghanistan in support of Operation Enduring Freedom.
TC Bennett was the Executive Officer of the USS KITTY HAWK aircraft carrier, served as Deputy Inspector General at the US Space Command and commanded a carrier based EA-6B Prowler squadron. CAPT Bennett completed 52 combat missions during his career and had 1385 successful carrier arrested landings.  Awarded two Legion of Merit medals, the Bronze Star, three Navy Strike Flight Air Medals, two Defense Meritorious Service Medals, two Meritorious Service Medals, a Navy Commendation Medal with Combat V, two Navy Achievement Medals, and various other awards and Campaign medals.  TC Bennett was qualified in the F/A-18 Hornet, A-6 Intruder, EA-6B Prowler, S-3 Viking, E-2 Hawkeye, and the SH-60B Seahawk helicopter.
"No words can express the utter and complete shock the Company is in, losing two pilots in less than 100 days in completely un-related accidents, in different aircraft, in different weather conditions and in different locations," CEO Jeff Parker said.  "ATAC would like to thank all who have expressed their condolences on the loss of this great American."
ATAC just finished flying over 200 hours in support of the Eisenhower Aircraft Carrier Battlegroup, over 150 hours in support of two major exercises in Guam and the PI, and was conducting training for the USMC at Yuma, AZ and Navy fighter squadrons off the coast of CA this week.  The accident happened on a fighter training mission for the military.
"ATAC will spare no effort to find out with absolute certainty what happened in working with the NTSB.  And we will in our usual style share that with the DOD," said Parker.

Saturday, May 19, 2012

Navy patrol ships continue to protect NZ waters


Rotoiti
Royal New Zealand Navy patrol ships will continue protecting New Zealand’s coastal waters 365 days of the year, the Navy has confirmed.
Chief of Navy, Rear Admiral Tony Parr, says New Zealanders will notice little difference as the Navy re-organises how it delivers its patrol commitments during a period when it is focused on regenerating personnel numbers after a period of higher than usual attrition.
"The Fleet Activity Plan for the coming year means that at least two, but often three, of the four IPVs will be available at any given time to undertake operational tasks around New Zealand," he says. "Indeed, the priority for manning of ships is to the patrol force and the Navy will look to other ships to pick up more of the patrol tasks during these periods to ensure our waters are protected."
Admiral Parr says previously the Navy operated the fleet with an objective of having all ships that are not engaged in maintenance available for operations. But it has been recognised that this model is unsustainable after a period of high attrition. In the coming year there will be times when ships that are not in maintenance will be at reduced availability.
"We’ve recognised that it is not only the ships that must rotate through maintenance, but also our people. Our people are important and so we’ve taken measures with them in mind, whilst maintaining our ability to carry out tasks required by the Government."
Admiral Parr says the Defence Force’s senior leadership have committed to lifting morale and slowing the number of people leaving all three Services.
"The changes Navy have made to the Fleet Activity Plan will allow our personnel to benefit from some respite – to conduct personal and professional development; to allow people to be at home with family longer; and for people to clear accumulated leave. This is an active approach to addressing issues our people have said are important.
"This is a period of people regeneration in order for the Navy to remain operationally effective in the long term. But our ships will continue to be at sea on duty, doing the jobs that matter to New Zealanders," says Admiral Parr.

Russian Navy News



RSS

Japan Supplied Russia with Submarine Reactor Storage Facilities05.18.2012Japan Supplied Russia with Submarine Reactor Storage Facilities
Japan Supplied Russia with Submarine Reactor Storage Facilities

Russia Boosts Production of Shelf Exploring Ships05.18.2012Russia Boosts Production of Shelf Exploring Ships
Russia Boosts Production of Shelf Exploring Ships

Pacific Fleet Prosecutor: People Guilty of Nerpa Tragedy, Not Equipment 05.18.2012Pacific Fleet Prosecutor: People Guilty of Nerpa Tragedy, Not Equipment
Pacific Fleet Prosecutor: People Guilty of Nerpa Tragedy, Not Equipment

Severnaya Verf Shipyard Obtained Government Guarantees 05.18.2012Severnaya Verf Shipyard Obtained Government Guarantees
Severnaya Verf Shipyard Obtained Government Guarantees

Pacific Fleet Ships to Attend RIMPAC Exercise for First Time Ever 05.18.2012Pacific Fleet Ships to Attend RIMPAC Exercise for First Time Ever
Pacific Fleet Ships to Attend RIMPAC Exercise for First Time Ever

State Defense Order 2011 Executed by 96.3%05.17.2012State Defense Order 2011 Executed by 96.3%
State Defense Order 2011 Executed by 96.3%

Vostochnaya Verf Shipyard Builds Grachonok Patrol Boat for Pacific Fleet05.17.2012Vostochnaya Verf Shipyard Builds Grachonok Patrol Boat for Pacific Fleet
Vostochnaya Verf Shipyard Builds Grachonok Patrol Boat for Pacific Fleet

Sevastopol Court Recovered Debt from Russian Defense Ministry05.17.2012Sevastopol Court Recovered Debt from Russian Defense Ministry
Sevastopol Court Recovered Debt from Russian Defense Ministry

Caspian Flotilla Task Unit Kicked Off Deployment 05.16.2012Caspian Flotilla Task Unit Kicked Off Deployment
Caspian Flotilla Task Unit Kicked Off Deployment

Russo-Norwegian Pomor-2012 Exercise Entered Final Stage05.16.2012Russo-Norwegian Pomor-2012 Exercise Entered Final Stage
Russo-Norwegian Pomor-2012 Exercise Entered Final Stage

SSK St. Petersburg Finishes Repair05.16.2012SSK St. Petersburg Finishes Repair
SSK St. Petersburg Finishes Repair

Black Sea Fleet Hydrographic Ship Donuzlav Returned to Sevastopol05.16.2012Black Sea Fleet Hydrographic Ship Donuzlav Returned to Sevastopol
Black Sea Fleet Hydrographic Ship Donuzlav Returned to Sevastopol

Russian, Norwegian Mariners Continue Pomor-2012 Exercise05.15.2012Russian, Norwegian Mariners Continue Pomor-2012 Exercise
Russian, Norwegian Mariners Continue Pomor-2012 Exercise

Procurement of Russian Unmanned Helicopters Begins in 201305.15.2012Procurement of Russian Unmanned Helicopters Begins in 2013
Procurement of Russian Unmanned Helicopters Begins in 2013

Yantar Built RUR 5-bln Landing Ship Ivan Gren for Russian Navy 05.15.2012Yantar Built RUR 5-bln Landing Ship Ivan Gren for Russian Navy
Yantar Built RUR 5-bln Landing Ship Ivan Gren for Russian Navy

Indian Navy MiG-29K Fighters Ready for Deck Stationing 05.15.2012Indian Navy MiG-29K Fighters Ready for Deck Stationing
Indian Navy MiG-29K Fighters Ready for Deck Stationing

Corvette Stoiky to Take Sea on May 3005.15.2012Corvette Stoiky to Take Sea on May 30
Corvette Stoiky to Take Sea on May 30

Two Pacific Fleet Units Received New Colors05.12.2012Two Pacific Fleet Units Received New Colors
Two Pacific Fleet Units Received New Colors

Vysotsky's Ouster: Refusal to Move Navy HQ to St. Petersburg05.12.2012Vysotsky's Ouster: Refusal to Move Navy HQ to St. Petersburg
Vysotsky's Ouster: Refusal to Move Navy HQ to St. Petersburg

Source: Dmitry Rogozin May Head Russian Defense Ministry 05.12.2012Source: Dmitry Rogozin May Head Russian Defense Ministry
Source: Dmitry Rogozin May Head Russian Defense Ministry

Indonesia Bought Russian Amphibious IFVs05.12.2012Indonesia Bought Russian Amphibious IFVs
Indonesia Bought Russian Amphibious IFVs

Vikramaditya to Get Israeli-made Barak Missile System05.12.2012Vikramaditya to Get Israeli-made Barak Missile System
Vikramaditya to Get Israeli-made Barak Missile System       

Wednesday, May 16, 2012

Lockheed Martin's Aegis Combat System Showcases Integrated Air and Missile Defense Capabilities

Lockheed Martin's Aegis Combat System recently demonstrated simultaneous anti-air warfare and ballistic missile defense capabilities during its first integrated air and missile defense test.

The successful test verified the capabilities of the most recent upgrade to the Aegis system, known as Baseline 9, which will provide integrated air and missile defense for the U.S. Navy's fleet to engage multiple threats at the same time. This test also marks the first time the Aegis system has used the multi-mission signal processor (MMSP) in a real-world environment where external aircraft are "jamming" the system.

"It's an exciting time to be part of Aegis' evolution," said Jim Sheridan, director of Aegis Baseline 9 programs for Lockheed Martin's Mission Systems & Sensors business. "This test is the culmination of two years of hard work by our Lockheed Martin engineers and marks the start of a new era where the Navy no longer has to choose between air or missile defense capabilities for any given mission."

The demonstration was conducted at the U.S. Navy's land-based test facility, the Vice Admiral James H. Doyle Combat Systems Engineering Development Site in Moorestown, N.J. Manufacturing work for the program will be performed in New Jersey, as well.

As a supplement to the Navy's Baseline 9 system, MMSP combines next-generation Aegis BMD and anti-air warfare capabilities in an open combat system architecture. The processor is scalable and easily upgradeable. 

Raytheon awarded $313.8 million for Standard Missile-6 all-up rounds


The U.S. Navy awarded Raytheon Company a $313.8 million contract for low-rate initial production of Standard Missile-6 all-up rounds.
SM-6 leverages the legacy Standard Missile airframe and propulsion elements, while incorporating the advanced signal processing and guidance control capabilities of Raytheon's Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile.
Work will be performed in Tucson, Ariz.Camden, Ark.Andover, Mass.Huntsville, Ala.Dallas, TexasHanahan, S.C.Anniston, Ala.San Jose, Calif.; and Middletown, Ohio, and is expected to completed by March 2015. 

A Dozen Lockheed Martin F-35s Now Call Eglin AFB Home



FORT WORTH, Texas, May 15, 2012 - The twelfth Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II destined for the training fleet at Eglin Air Force Base, Fla., was ferried today. U.S. Marine Corps pilot Lt. Col. Fred Schenk piloted the aircraft, known as BF-11, which departed Naval Air Station Fort Worth Joint Reserve Base, Texas at 10:02 a.m. CDT for an approximate 90-minute flight to Florida's Emerald Coast.
 The F-35B short takeoff/vertical landing production jet is now assigned to the Marine Fighter/Attack Training Squadron 501 residing with the host 33d Fighter Wing, where it will be used for pilot and maintainer training.

Tuesday, May 15, 2012

Lockheed Martin's New Standalone Launching System Significantly Reduces Weapons Integration Costs


Nulka1.jpg
Lockheed Martin successfully demonstrated the latest variant of its new launching system that maximizes the use of existing hardware and electronics to reduce the integration costs of weapons by more than 50 percent.

During a May 5 test at the Royal Australian Air Force's Woomera Test Range in South Australia, the new Extensible Launching System (ExLS) standalone variant successfully fired two Nulka Offboard Countermeasure missile decoy test rounds. One decoy was provided by the U.S. Navy and the other by the Nulka designer and manufacturer BAE Systems Australia.

Developed in just 10 months, the new ExLS variant offers an alternative for vertically launched weapons on surface ships that aren't equipped with a vertical launching system (VLS), such as a MK 41 or MK 57. The ExLS standalone variant is ideally suited for smaller vessel classes.

Installed below deck, the new launcher significantly reduces the integration costs for individual weapons by serving as an adapter between the canister of a missile or munition and its qualified electronics, and the ship's existing weapons system.

"As initially envisioned, Lockheed Martin's original ExLS worked with ships equipped with either MK 41 or MK 57 Vertical Launch Systems, and we saw an opportunity expand the capability," said Colleen Arthur, director of Integrated Defense Systems for Lockheed Martin's Mission System & Sensors business. "With new standalone ExLS configuration, ships do not have to be equipped with a larger vertical launching system and can quickly and affordably adapt to different types of munitions."

The test in Australia also successfully demonstrated the system's Nulka munition adapter - a unique feature that enables the missile decoy to quickly and cost-effectively be inserted into ExLS. Adapters can also be developed for other missiles and munitions.

Work on the ExLS standalone launcher is done at Lockheed Martin's Baltimore, Md., facility.

Lockheed Martin's Second Generation Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense System Successfully Intercepts Missile


FTM-14 missile test
The Missile Defense Agency (MDA), U.S. Navy and Lockheed Martin team successfully intercepted a ballistic missile target for the first time, using the second generation of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense (BMD) system, known as Aegis BMD 4.0.1.

This second-generation system, which was certified in March, introduces the Aegis BMD signal processor to improve target identification capabilities and uses open architecture standards to integrate commercial-off-the-shelf technology.

During the test, the system successfully tracked and engaged a short-range ballistic missile target, proving its air defense capabilities. This exercise was the sixth time the USS Lake Erie (CG 70) has successfully performed during Navy and MDA at-sea test events with the second-generation Aegis BMD configuration in the past 28 months.

"The second-generation Aegis BMD System provides enhanced discrimination, coordinated engagements and integrated kill-assessment capabilities allowing the fleet to keep pace with emerging ballistic missile threats," said Nick Bucci, director of BMD development programs at Lockheed Martin's Mission Systems & Sensors business unit. "This test continues to demonstrate the maturity of the Aegis BMD system and reaffirms its role as the cornerstone of national and international forward-deployed missile defense efforts."

The Aegis BMD 4.0.1 configuration, now operational on two Navy ships, enables the MDA and Navy to defeat more sophisticated ballistic missile threats. The BMD signal processor is a commercial-off-the-shelf adjunct signal processor using open architecture standards. The configuration also includes an open architecture BMD computing suite that improves overall system capabilities and enables future insertion of more off-the-shelf products, third party components and turn-key solutions.

The test also marks an important milestone for the second phase of the Phased Adaptive Approach to missile defense in Europe.

The SPY-1 radar is the central component of the Lockheed Martin-developed Aegis Weapon System. It is the most widely fielded naval phased array radar in the world. The radar system provides the U.S. and allied nations with advanced surveillance, anti-air warfare and missile defense capabilities.

The next planned BMD evolution will combine air defense and missile defense functionality into a single integrated air and missile defense system.

The MDA and the Navy are jointly developing Aegis BMD as part of the United States' Ballistic Missile Defense System. Currently, a total of 27 Aegis BMD-equipped warships - 23 in the U.S. Navy and four in the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force - have the certified capability to engage ballistic missiles and perform long-range surveillance and tracking missions. The number of BMD ships will increase to 36 by 2014.

Tetra Tech Awarded $200 Million Multiple-Award U.S. Navy Remediation Contract


Tetra Tech, Inc. announced today that its Tetra Tech EC subsidiary was one of four firms selected for a $200 million Environmental Multiple Award Contract (EMAC) for environmental remediation services at U.S. Navy, Marine Corps, and other Department of Defense locations primarily in California and the southwestern United States. The EMAC supports the Naval Facilities Engineering Command (NAVFAC) Southwest and NAVFAC Atlantic areas of responsibility to include the U.S. trust territories of Puerto Rico and Guam.
“Tetra Tech is pleased to continue to support the U.S. Navy in its critical environmental remediation mission”
The EMAC focuses on restoration projects at environmentally contaminated sites. Tetra Tech EC will perform remedial actions, removal actions, and remedial design; operation and maintenance services; pilot and treatability studies; and other related activities. This indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract is a firm-fixed-price contract of a base year and four one-year options.
“Tetra Tech is pleased to continue to support the U.S. Navy in its critical environmental remediation mission,” said Dan Batrack, Tetra Tech’s Chairman and CEO.

Monday, May 14, 2012

Got a Pirate Problem? There's Even an App for That

The guided-missile destroyer USS Kidd (DDG 100) responds to a distress call from the master of the Iranian-flagged fishing dhow Al Molai, who claimed he was being held captive by pirates.
The Department of Defense will begin funding an Office of Naval Research (ONR)-sponsored project aimed at developing Web applications to help multinational navies police the world's oceans, officials announced May 14. 

The International Collaborative Development for Enhanced Maritime Domain Awareness (ICODE MDA) was one of 14 projects selected by the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics to receive $1 million awards beginning this fall through the Coalition Warfare Program, which funds international collaborative research efforts. 

The ICODE MDA project is a research alliance between ONR and Space and Naval Warfare (SPAWAR) Systems Center Pacific (SSC Pacific). ONR is partnering with scientists in Chile to build widgets, or Web-based applications, for use by sailors and maritime operators to analyze data and other information to combat pirates, drug smugglers, arms traffickers, illegal fishermen and other nefarious groups. 

"A lot of maritime threats occur in developing parts of the world," said Dr. Augustus Vogel, associate director for Latin America and sub-Saharan Africa in ONR-Global's Chile office. "Our goal is to develop partnerships with countries that have maritime threats to help solve those problems." 

ONR will tap researchers at the Technical University of Federico Santa Maria, one of Chile's top engineering schools, to create Web-based tools in an open source environment. The work will focus on producing software to improve automation, small-target detection and intent detection. 

Ultimately, the software will be compatible with multiple maritime network systems so that navies around the world can use the tools and share information for global operations. 

"We'll take those tools and integrate them into a widget framework that can be part of a coalition-accessible Web portal," said John Stastny, an engineer in the advanced analysis systems branch at SSC Pacific, who is helping to lead the ICODE MDA project. 

The effort in Chile is part of a larger collaborative project that encompasses nations in Africa, where ICODE MDA has been underway with researchers at the University of Ghana, University of Pretoria, University of Mauritius and the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research in South Africa. 

ONR provides the science and technology necessary to maintain the Navy and Marine Corps' technological advantage. Through its affiliates, ONR is a leader in science and technology with engagement in 50 states, 70 countries, 1,035 institutions of higher learning and 914 industry partners. ONR employs approximately 1,400 people, comprising uniformed, civilian and contract personnel, with additional employees at the Naval Research Lab in Washington, D.C.