Friday, May 31, 2013

Services Deliver F-35 Initial Operational Capability Timelines to Congress

he carrier variant of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter flies for the first time with external weapons.

The Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps delivered a joint report to congressional defense committees May 31 to establish the date and details of the initial operational capability (IOC) of each service's variant of the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, as directed by the National Defense Authorization Act.

Congress directed the Secretary of the Air Force and Secretary of the Navy to provide a report that details the IOC dates, requirements, and capabilities for each of the F-35 variants by June 1, 2013. The Air Force, Marine Corps, and Navy will achieve IOC once they acquire enough aircraft to establish one operational squadron with enough trained and equipped personnel to support the various missions prescribed by each service.

Based on the current F-35 Joint Program Office schedule, the Air Force F-35A will reach the IOC milestone by December 2016, while the Marine Corps F-35B will reach the IOC milestone by December 2015. F-35C, attached to Navy carrier air wings, will reach the IOC milestone by February 2019.

"The F-35C represents a critical capability, really a revolutionary capability, that will significantly enhance the ability of our carrier air wings to continue to operate in contested battlespace," said Rear Admiral Bill Moran, Chief of Naval Operations' Director of Air Warfare. "We look forward to introducing and fully integrating this important capability into our air wings." 

Navy leadership believes the F-35 will revolutionize capability and operating concepts of naval aviation using advanced technologies to find, fix, and assess threats, and, if necessary track, target, and engage them with lethal results in all contested environments.

The F-35C carrier variant of the Lightning II is distinct from the F-35A and F-35B variants with its larger wing surfaces and reinforced landing gear; features used to withstand catapult launches and deck landing impacts associated with the demanding aircraft carrier environment. The F-35C is undergoing flight testing and evaluation at NAS Patuxent River prior to fleet delivery.

The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter program is a joint, multi-national program. In addition to U.S. armed forces, the F-35 increases operational flexibility and interoperability with the eight other international partners participating in the development of the aircraft. They are the United Kingdom, Italy, the Netherlands, Turkey, Canada, Australia, Denmark, and Norway.

Airbus Military launches C295W aircraft with enhanced performance



Airbus Military today announces the launch of a new series of its best-selling C295 medium transport and surveillance aircraft – the C295W.
Featuring winglets and uprated engines as standard, the new model will provide operators with enhanced performance in all flight phases but is particularly aimed at those operating at “hot and high“ airfields where payload increases in excess of 1,000kg are promised.
In intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR) roles such as airborne early warning (AEW) the enhancements will increase endurance by 30-60min and permit an operating altitude up to 2,000ft higher than now.
The new features will also provide an overall reduction in fuel consumption of around 4% depending on configuration and conditions.
The C295W, assembled in Seville, Spain, is being offered to the market from now on and will be the standard version of the aircraft in all versions from the fourth quarter of 2014. Certification is expected in 2Q14.
Airbus Military is committing to the C295W following flight-trials with winglets fitted to its company development aircraft which showed positive results for a weight penalty of only around 90kg.
The engines are the Pratt & Whitney Canada PW127 turboprops which power all versions of the C295. New procedures recently certified by Canada and Spain permit operation in the climb and cruise phases at higher power settings at the discretion of the operator. As well as improved hot and high performance, the procedure improves operation over very high terrain such as the Andes or Himalaya mountains with only a minor influence on maintenance cost.
Airbus Military Head of Programmes, Light & Medium, and Derivatives, Rafael Tentor said: “The C295 has consistently been the market leader in all sectors in which it is offered. By investing in continuous development of the aircraft we are committed to maintaining its leadership through the introduction of substantial operating benefits. We very much look forward to discussing the C295W with existing and prospective customers.”

Thursday, May 30, 2013

Saab Receives Order for the Underwater Vehicle System AUV62



Defence and security company Saab has signed a contract on delivery of Autonomous Underwater Vehicle systems, AUV62, in training configuration. The order has a total value of MSEK 148 and system deliveries will take place during 2014.
The order comprises the supply of AUV62, the latest version of the Autonomous Underwater Vehicle in a configuration as training target for Anti Submarine Warfare (ASW) training.
“The AUV62 is a competent and advanced system that will enhance and strengthen the customer’s underwater capabilities. We are of course very satisfied to have been able to secure yet another order for the system,” says Görgen Johansson, Senior Vice President and Head of Business Area Dynamics.
The AUV62 is an advanced and highly modern Autonomous Underwater Vehicle available in several different configurations and already selected by a number of customers.
Equipped with an Acoustic payload it is an advanced and capable system for cost-efficient training of a navy’s ASW forces. The AUV62 is an artificial acoustic target that mimics a submarine in a way that is compatible with any torpedo- and sonar system on the market today. The AUV62 system fully replaces the use of a submarine in the role as a manoeuvring training target.
Equipped with a Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) payload it is an efficient system for Mine Search, Reconnaissance and Seabed Mapping. With the AUV62 Saab offers a state-of-the-art Autonomous Underwater System for demanding customers investing in the future.
The industry’s nature is such that depending on circumstances concerning the product and customer, information regarding the customer will not be announced.

Manssor Arbabsiar Sentenced in New York City Federal Court to 25 Years in Prison for Conspiring with Iranian Military Officials to Assassinate the Saudi Arabian Ambassador to the United States

sathiyam.tv

Manssor Arbabsiar, aka “Mansour Arbabsiar,” was sentenced today in New York City federal court to 25 years in prison for participating in a plot to murder the Saudi Arabian Ambassador to the U.S. while the Ambassador was in the U.S., announced John Carlin, Acting Assistant Attorney General for the National Security Division at the Department of Justice and Preet Bharara, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York.
Arbabsiar, a 58 year-old naturalized U.S. citizen holding both Iranian and U.S. passports, was arrested on Sept. 29, 2011, at John F. Kennedy International Airport.  He pleaded guilty on Oct. 17, 2012, to one count of murder-for-hire, one count of conspiracy to commit murder-for-hire, and one count of conspiracy to commit an act of terrorism transcending national boundaries before U.S. District Judge John F. Keenan, who also imposed today’s sentence.
“Thanks to the collaborative efforts of many U.S. law enforcement and intelligence professionals, Manssor Arbabsiar is today being held accountable for his role in this assassination plot,” said Acting Assistant Attorney General for National Security John Carlin.  “I applaud all those responsible for ensuring that Arbabsiar and his co-conspirators in Iran’s Qods Force failed in their efforts.  Today’s sentencing serves as a reminder of the evolving threat environment we face.”
“Manssor Arbabsiar was an enemy among us – the key conduit for, and facilitator of, a nefarious international plot concocted by members of the Iranian military to assassinate the Saudi Ambassador to the United States and as many innocent bystanders as necessary to get the job done,” said U.S. Attorney Bharara.  “And but for the vigilance of our FBI and DEA partners, his plot, and the unspeakable harm it would have caused, may well have come to fruition, which is exactly why our commitment to using every resource we have to root out, prosecute and punish people like Arbabsiar, who act as emissaries for our enemies, remains unflagging.”
           
According to the complaint and indictment filed in federal court:
From the spring of 2011 to October 2011, Arbabsiar and his Iran-based co-conspirators, including members of Iran’s Qods Force, plotted the murder of the Saudi Arabian Ambassador to the U.S.  In furtherance of this conspiracy, Arbabsiar met on a number of occasions in Mexico with a DEA confidential source (CS-1) who posed as an associate of a violent international drug trafficking cartel.  Arbabsiar arranged to hire CS-1 and CS-1’s purported accomplices to murder the Ambassador with the awareness and approval of his Iran-based co-conspirators.  Arbabsiar wired approximately $100,000 to a bank account in the U.S. as a down payment to CS-1 for the anticipated killing of the Ambassador, which was to take place in the U.S, also with the approval of his co-conspirators.
The Qods Force is a branch of the Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC), which conducts sensitive covert operations abroad, including terrorist attacks, assassinations, and kidnappings, and is believed to have sponsored attacks against Coalition Forces in Iraq.  In October 2007, the U.S. Treasury Department designated the Qods Force as a terrorist supporter for providing material support to the Taliban and other terrorist organizations.
Arbabsiar met with CS-1 in Mexico on several occasions between May 2011 and July 2011.  During the course of these meetings, he inquired as to CS-1’s knowledge with respect to explosives and explained that he was interested in, among other things, attacking an embassy of Saudi Arabia and the murder of the Saudi Ambassador to the U.S.  In a July 14, 2011 meeting in Mexico, CS-1 told Arbabsiar that he would need to use at least four men to carry out the Ambassador’s murder and that his price for doing so was $1.5 million.  Arbabsiar agreed and stated that the murder of the Ambassador should be handled first, before the execution of other attacks that he had discussed with CS-1.  Arbabsiar also indicated that he and his associates had $100,000 in Iran to give CS-1 as a first payment toward the assassination.
During the same meeting, Arbabsiar also described to CS-1 his cousin in Iran, who he said had requested that Arbabsiar find someone to carry out the Ambassador’s assassination.  Arbabsiar indicated that his cousin was a “big general” in the Iranian military, that he focuses on matters outside of Iran, and that he had taken certain unspecified actions related to a bombing in Iraq. 
In a July 17, 2011, meeting in Mexico, CS-1 noted to Arbabsiar that one of his workers had already traveled to Washington, D.C., to surveil the Ambassador.  CS-1 also raised the possibility of innocent bystander casualties.  Arbabsiar made it clear that the assassination needed to go forward, despite mass casualties, telling CS-1, “They want that guy [the Ambassador] done [killed], if the hundred go with him f**k ‘em.”  CS-1 and Arbabsiar discussed bombing a restaurant in the U.S. that the Ambassador frequented.  When CS-1 noted that others could be killed in the attack, including U.S. senators who dine at the restaurant, Arbabsiar dismissed these concerns as “no big deal.”
On Aug. 1 and Aug. 9, 2011, Arbabsiar caused two overseas wire transfers totaling approximately $100,000 to be sent to an FBI undercover account as a down payment for CS-1 to carry out the assassination.  Later, Arbabsiar explained to CS-1 that he would provide the remainder of the $1.5 million after the assassination.  On Sept. 20, 2011, CS-1 told Arbabsiar that the operation was ready and requested that he either pay one half the agreed upon price ($1.5 million) for the murder or that Arbabsiar personally travel to Mexico as collateral for the final payment of the fee.  Arbabsiar agreed to travel to Mexico to guarantee final payment for the murder.
On Sept. 28, 2011, Arbabsiar flew to Mexico, and he was refused entry into the country and placed on a return flight destined for his last point of departure.  The following day, Arbabsiar was arrested by federal agents during a flight layover at JFK International Airport in New York.  Several hours after his arrest, Arbabsiar was advised of his Miranda rights and he agreed to waive those rights and speak with law enforcement agents.  During a series of Mirandized interviews, Arbabsiar confessed to his participation in the murder plot.
In addition, Arbabsiar admitted to agents that, in connection with this plot, he was recruited, funded, and directed by men he understood to be senior officials in Iran’s Qods Force.  He said these Iranian officials were aware of, and approved of, the use of CS-1 in connection with the plot, as well as payments to CS-1, the means by which the Ambassador would be killed in the U.S., and the casualties that would likely result. 
Arbabsiar also told agents that his cousin, whom he had long understood to be a senior member of the Qods Force, had approached him in the early spring of 2011 about recruiting narco-traffickers to kidnap the Ambassador.  He told agents that he then met with CS-1 in Mexico and discussed assassinating the Ambassador.  Arbabsiar said that afterwards, he met several times in Iran with Gholam Shakuri, aka “Ali Gholam Shakuri,” a co-conspirator and Iran-based member of the Qods Force, and another senior Qods Force official, where Arbabsiar explained that the plan was to blow up a restaurant in the U.S. frequented by the Ambassador and that numerous bystanders would be killed.  According to Arbabsiar, the plan was approved by these officials.
In October 2011, after his arrest, Arbabsiar made phone calls at the direction of law enforcement to Shakuri in Iran that were monitored.  During these calls, Shakuri confirmed that Arbabsiar should move forward with the plot to murder the Ambassador and that he should accomplish the task as quickly as possible, stating on Oct. 5, 2011, “[j]ust do it quickly, it’s late…”  Shakuri also told Arbabsiar that he would consult with his superiors about whether they would be willing to pay CS-1 additional money.  Shakuri, who was also charged in the plot, remains at large.
*                *                *
In addition to the prison term, Arbabsiar was ordered to pay forfeiture in the amount of $125,000.
This case was investigated by the FBI Houston Division, the DEA Houston Division, and the FBI New York Joint Terrorism Task Force, with the assistance of the Department of Justice’s Office of International Affairs, its National Security Division, and the Department of State.  The Government of Mexico also cooperated with the investigation.
This case is being handled by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York, Terrorism and International Narcotics Unit.  Assistant U.S. Attorneys Glen Kopp, Edward Kim, and Stephen Ritchin are in charge of the prosecution with assistance from the Counterterrorism Section of the Justice Department’s National Security Division.

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

Newport News Shipbuilding Appoints John Temple to Vice President of Contracts Management for Savannah River Nuclear Solutions

John Temple (thumbnail)
NEWPORT NEWS, Va., May 29, 2013 - Huntington Ingalls Industries announced today that John Temple has been promoted to vice president of contracts management for Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS). SRNS is a joint partnership between Newport News Shipbuilding (NNS), Fluor Corp. and Honeywell that manages operations of the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in Aiken, S.C.

Lab effort to cut costs for Navy's Triton UAS program

Paul Weinstein, an electronics engineer supporting the Common Standards and Interoperability (CSI) program office at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Md., views imagery transmitted from sensors aboard an aircraft. His team stood up a government-led image quality lab here in 2012 that will help determine how to effectively employ sensors and radars for the MQ-4C Triton and potentially other manned and unmanned aircraft in the future. (U.S. Navy photo by Emily Burdeshaw)
An engineer at Naval Air Station Patuxent River is leading an initiative that will save the Navy’s MQ-4C Triton Unmanned Aircraft System program several hundred thousand dollars.
Paul Weinstein, an electronics engineer supporting the Common Standards and Interoperability (CSI) program office, launched an image quality lab in 2012 that will help determine how to effectively employ Triton’s sensors and radars and potentially other manned and unmanned systems.
In preparation for the first Triton image evaluation, Weinstein, a former National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency (NGA) employee, worked with the agency to provide the necessary training, software and image scientists for the first official evaluation of the P-8A aircraft’s Electro-Optical (EO) sensor. Since the P-8A and MQ-4C are part of the Maritime Patrol and Reconnaissance Force family of systems, Weinstein’s team made a decision to evaluate the P-8 first and include test engineers from both programs.
“Paul did an outstanding job getting this image quality assessment capability set up and running,” said Pat Ellis, MQ-4C Triton’s Mission Systems lead. “This will save the Triton program several hundred thousand dollars, since we will not have to submit packages for image ratings to NGA and the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) for our imaging systems.”
Without this capability at Pax River, the Navy would have to rely on NGA to perform sensor testing, at a cost of more than $150,000 per evaluation. It would also take more than a month to return the analysis to the team. By having the lab at Pax, each test is virtually free and it takes less than one week to turn around the data to the test team, Weinstein said.
“This level of testing will enable program offices to make smart budget decisions with respect to changes to the current network and current integration measures as well as future integration efforts,” Ellis said.
Typically, image analysts perform this function, but the evaluation proved that test engineers can analyze images and make effective mission-planning decisions.
“We are following the fly-fix-fly philosophy as we figure out solutions that will allow lower bandwidth platforms to send better quality video,” Weinstein added. “We need to understand if a platform can meet its mission and avoid it just flying out and burning fuel.”
The first imagery evaluation for MQ-4C Triton will be conducted after the team has data available from Triton’s first flight, which was conducted May 22 at Northrop Grumman’s facility in Palmdale, Calif. The image-quality lab team will evaluate the MQ-4C’s EO/Infrared (IR) and Synthetic Aperture Radar sensors.
“The ability to collect and share real-time Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR)  quickly and accurately is crucial to ensuring battle commanders have the enhanced situational awareness required for a successful mission,” said Capt. Jim Hoke, MQ-4C Triton program manager.
 As an adjunct to the manned P-8 aircraft, Triton is intended to provide persistent maritime and littoral ISR data collection and dissemination capability to the fleet.

This Week in Naval History

30 May 1904: “Perdicaris Alive or Raisuli Dead”


On 30 May 1904, the Marine Detachment from USS Brooklyn (ACR-3) landed at Tangiers, Morocco to protect the American Consulate during the dispute between Raisuli and the Sultan Abdelaziz of Morocco. Ion Perdicaris, a Greek-American, and his son were kidnapped by Raisuli, and he asked for a ransom. President Theodore Roosevelt eventually forced Abdelaziz to pay the ransom with his statement, “Perdicaris Alive or Raisuli Dead!”

31 May 1919: Completion of the Transatlantic Flight NC-4 

File:Curtiss NC-4 four engine configuration-detail.jpg

On 31 May 1919, NC-4 landed at Plymouth, England, concluding the first Trans-Atlantic flight. The NC-4 crew were greeted by the Lord Mayor and citizens upon their arrival.

1 June 1944: Blimp Squadron Fourteen crossed the Atlantic 


On May 31, 1944, blimp K-123 with the first transatlantic mail on board, was the first blimp to take-off from Lagens Field in the Azores on the final leg of the first transatlantic flight by non-rigid airships. Ens. William K. Kaiser, co-pilot, is in the forward lookout position and Ens. Warren H. Ireland, co-pilot, is looking out the starboard window manning the rudder. Behind Ens. Kaiser is Lt.(jg) Homer B. Bly, pilot, on the elevator. Naval Airship Association.

On 1 June 1944, Blimp Squadron Fourteen (ZP-14) Airships, K-123 and K-130, completed the first crossing of the Atlantic by non-rigid-lighter-than-air aircraft. The blimps left Naval Air Station, South Weymouth, MA and arrived at Gibraltar. The journey took 50 hours.

2 Jun 1941: USS Long Island (ACG-1) was commissioned


On 2 June 1941, the first aircraft escort vessel, USS Long Island (ACG-1), was commissioned. In August 1942, she was reclassified as an auxiliary aircraft carrier (AVC 1) and was reclassified as an escort carrier (CVE 1) in July 1943. Following WWII, she participated in Operation "Magic Carpet". Decommissioned in March 1946, she was sold for scrapping in April 1947. However, Long Island was subsequently resurrected to become the civilian passenger ship Nelly. In 1953, she was renamed Seven Seas and later served as a student’s hostel at Rotterdam University until scrapped in 1977 at Belgium.

3 Jun 1949: 1st African-American graduate of the US Naval Academy 


On 3 June 1949, Midshipman Wesley A. Brown became the first African-American to graduate from the U.S. Naval Academy. He became a Civil Engineering Officer, serving in both the Korean and Vietnam Wars. After twenty years of service, Brown retired as a Lieutenant Commander. In honor of Wesley A. Brown, the Field House at the US Naval Academy was named in honor in 2006.

4 Jun 1942: Battle of Midway – Part I


On 4 June 1942, the Battle of Midway began. During that morning, after sending planes to attack the U.S. base at Midway, the Japanese carriers Akagi, Kaga and Soryu were fatally damaged by dive bombers from USS Enterprise (CV-6) and USS Yorktown (CV-5). Later in the day, Yorktown was abandoned after bomb and torpedo hits by planes from Hiryu. The latter was, in turn, knocked out by U.S. carrier planes. Compelled by their losses to abandon their plans to capture Midway, the Japanese retired westward. The battle was a decisive win for the U.S, bringing an end to Japanese naval superiority in the Pacific.

4 Jun 1942: Battle of Midway - Part 2


Battle of Midway. After searching in vain for the Japanese fleet and on the point of returning to their carriers, the United States dive-bomber pilots saw the whole Japanese carrier strike force below. The combat air patrol which should have been above the carriers to protect them were at sea level destroying the American torpedo-bombers. The SBD Dauntless dive bombers attacked from 15,000 feet just at the moment when the carriers Akagi, Kaga, and Soryu were enveloped in flames and destroyed.


5 Jun 1794 - 1st U.S. Navy officers appointed under Constitution 


On 5 June 1794, the first officers of the U.S. Navy under the Constitution were appointed. The first six captains appointed to superintend the construction of new ships were: John Barry, Samuel Nicholson, Silas Talbot, Joshua Barney, Richard Dale, and Thomas Truxtun.

Tuesday, May 28, 2013

Thales awarded milestone Royal Navy services contract

SSOP_sp
Thales UK has today signed a 10-year contract with the Ministry of Defence (MOD), worth up to £600M, for the in-service support of the Royal Navy’s major sensor systems.
The new Sensors Support Optimisation Project (SSOP) builds on the proven success of Thales’s Contractor Logistics Support contract, originally signed in 2003, which has provided support to the Royal Navy’s sonar and electronic warfare systems for the past 10 years.
Under the terms of SSOP, the in-service support contract has now been extended to include all of the Royal Navy’s submarine visual systems, including periscopes for the Vanguard and Trafalgar Class submarines and the non-hull-penetrating optronic masts for the Astute Class submarines, previously supported under separate contract arrangements with Thales UK’s optronics business in Glasgow.
This means Thales is now providing significant in-service support to the ‘eyes and ears’ of the submarine fleet, as well as across the major surface sonar and electronic warfare systems.
The contract will be run through the Equipment Support Delivery Team, which is a joint MOD/Thales UK team based in Abbey Wood, Bristol. This team is augmented by several Thales and J+S Ltd waterfront engineers in the Royal Navy’s three naval bases (Portsmouth, Plymouth and Faslane), who together ensure that specialist technical advice and support is delivered whenever it is needed to ensure the continued availability of the sensor systems, both at home and overseas.
Philip Dunne, Minister for Defence Equipment, Support and Technology, signed the contract during a visit to Thales’s facility in Crawley today.  He said: “This contract is good news for the Ministry of Defence and UK industry. Not only will it secure a number of jobs across the UK whilst delivering savings but will also provide essential support for the combat equipment that helps give the Royal Navy’s fleet of ships and submarines a vital technological edge wherever they are based in the world.”
Victor Chavez, CEO of Thales UK, said: “This contract recognises the value that can be achieved and the savings that can be delivered through a long-term services agreement. It also reflects the successful way in which Thales UK has delivered the required outputs over the past ten years. This project refines that approach to optimise performance over the next ten years, and reinforces our positive well-established relationship with the Royal Navy.” 
During the previous support contract, the levels of equipment availability have improved significantly and substantial overall savings in the cost of support have been achieved. The new SSOP contract builds on this experience and success, from the outset delivering further savings to the MOD whilst continuing to deliver high levels of available and serviceable equipment.
The new contract secures employment for 230 Thales employees and a further 300 people within the extended supply chain across the UK.
Major suppliers to Thales include J+S Ltd (Barnstaple, Devon), MacTaggart Scott (Loanhead, Scotland), Atlas Elektronik UK (Newport, South Wales and Winfrith, Dorset), Parkburn Ltd (Telford, Shropshire), AB Precision (Poole) Ltd (Dorset), and Defence Support Group (Sealand, Flintshire).
Thales UK will support the project from its sites in Templecombe, Cheadle Heath, Glasgow and Crawley, where ongoing development of these important systems will enable yet further improvements to be made in the levels of capability and availability.

Monday, May 27, 2013

Saab invests in Indian company Pipavav



In august 2012 defence and security company Saab announced that a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) had been signed concerning a strategic investment in the listed Indian company Pipavav Offshore and Defence Engineering Ltd (Pipavav). The investment of MSEK 250 has now been made in shares issued through a, to Saab, directed share issue. After the investment, Saab holds approximately 3.3 per cent of the capital and votes in the company. The investment will be financed from Saab's own readily available resources.
Pipavav is a well-known company in the naval domain in India and has the ambition to grow in other areas of defence as well. And at the same time as the MOU was signed, Saab and Pipavav also signed a Technical Partnership Agreement (TPA), a continuation of an ongoing co-operation between the companies covering details about the format for continued relationships and relevant projects.
"We are pleased to announce this partnership and our strategic investment in Pipavav. The investment offers a solid platform for growth for us on the Indian market and Pipavav strengthens their competitive position through Saab’s technology.India is an important market for us and the investment will further reinforce Saab's strong position on the global defence and security market,” says Lars Olof Lindgren, Head of Market Area, SaabIndia
Saab and Pipavav have previously also jointly formed the Combat System Engineering group, which analyses naval combat system design and architecture. The companies are also exploring next generation combat management systems for the Indian Navy and Coast Guard.
Saab serves the global market with world-leading products, services and solutions ranging from military defence to civil security. Saab has operations and employees on all continents and constantly develops, adopts and improves new technology to meet customers’ changing needs.

Saturday, May 25, 2013

Iran Refitting 50 Year Old Corvette for Further Service



TEHRAN (FNA)- Iranian experts are overhauling and modernizing a destroyer which will join the country's naval fleet in the near future, an Iranian navy commander announced.


Speaking to reporters on Thursday, Lieutenant Commander of the Iranian Navy Rear Admiral Gholam Reza Khadem Biqam said that the Iranian navy is overhauling and modernizing a destroyer named Bayandor.

"Due to advanced technological advancements and making use of up-to-date equipment applied in other warships and destroyers, it was felt that certain changes should be made in this destroyer and we managed to update and upgrade the equipment of this destroyer which will be unveiled in the near future," he stated.

Earlier this month, Navy Commander Rear Admiral Habibollah Sayyari had announced that the country is overhauling and modernizing Bayandor destroyer to make it ready for missions in international waters.

"The Bayandor Destroyer will join the naval fleet after undergoing major repair work and being equipped with various weapons systems," Sayyari told reporters at the time.

He said that Iran can use the destroyer to carry out missions in international waters in the future.

Sayyari said the destroyer is fitted with state-of-the-art equipment such as missile, torpedo, artillery, sonar and other information and communication systems. 

Friday, May 24, 2013

Israeli Navy marks 40 years since Yom Kippur War

The Israeli Navy marked 40 years since the naval battles of the 1973 Yom Kippur War with a commemorative evening May 22nd at Haifa’s International Convention Center.
The event, honoring veterans of the Yom Kippur War from the Israeli Navy, was attended by many naval commanders, including Navy Commander in Chief Vice Adm. Ram Rothberg.
Attendees examining photos from the Yom Kippur War
Delivering the evening’s address, Vice Adm. Rothberg addressed the Yom Kippur War veterans themselves, many of whom were in attendance. The naval chief noted their contributions in protecting the country.
“We fought the war with soldiers who displayed excellent strength and a will to win. These values were reflected in every encounter with the enemy. You all proved the superiority of the human and the ship over those of the enemy,” he said.
The evening included a panel discussion attended by Navy personnel past and present, including Lt. Commander (res.) Boaz Shakedi, who received the Medal of Honor for his participation in the Yom Kippur War’s Operation Lady; Commander Zvika Shahak, who earned a medal for his bravery in that war’s Battle of Marsa Talamat; and Ronnie Telem, the daughter of former Navy Commander in Chief Vice Adm. Benjamin Telem.
Also present at the event were father and son Itzik and Shai Hudera – the former a naval veteran of the Yom Kippur War and the latter, his son, currently a Lt. Commander in the Navy. The two discussed their lifelong passion for the Navy.
Lt. Commander Shai Hudera (left) and his father, Itzik Hudera
“For us, being in the Navy is a family affair,” said Lt. Commander Hudera. “Me, my father, and all my brothers.”
Itzik used the night to look back and reminisce with old friends from his service in the Navy. “We haven’t seen each other in 40 years,” he said. “For me, this was more a night to see the people I served with again, the people I shared this experience with.”
The Navy’s commander closed the conference by discussing the past and looking toward the future. “We fight a different type of war nowadays. New enemies and different technologies will continue to appear, but our foundation is based on the things you all laid out for us – your energy and your capabilities to go above and beyond in 1973,” he concluded.

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Future USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) Keel Authenticated

A photo illustration of the Zumwalt-class destroyer  USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001).

The keel laying and authentication ceremony for the future Zumwalt-class Destroyer USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) was held at the General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard, May 23. 

The keel authenticators were George and Sally Monsoor, parents of the ship's namesake Medal of Honor recipient Petty Officer Second Class Michael A. Monsoor. They confirmed that the keel is "truly and fairly" laid by having their initials welded into a steel plate that will be affixed to the ship's hull. 

The keel is the backbone of a ship, providing the basis of structural strength to the hull. Before modular ship construction methods, the keel was generally the first part of a ship's hull to be constructed. Laying the keel, or placing the keel in the cradle in which the ship will be built, was and still is a milestone event in a ship's construction. 

Today, contemporary modular shipbuilding allows the fabrication of the ship to begin months earlier. The keel laying continues to be symbolically recognized as the first joining of the ship's components and is the ceremonial beginning of the ship. 

The ultra unit that was used for laying the ship's keel weighs over 4,500 tons and will serve as the ship's main and auxiliary machinery rooms, ship's galley, living quarters, and work spaces. 

"Together with Bath Iron Works, we're very honored to have the Monsoor family with us here today to commemorate the first milestone in bringing this ship to life," said Capt. Jim Downey, DDG 1000 program manager, Program Executive Office, Ships. "This extremely capable warship is a lasting tribute to Petty Officer Monsoor's bravery and sacrifice and will symbolize his strength and dedication for generations to come." 

Petty Officer Second Class Michael A. Monsoor, a U.S. Navy SEAL, was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for his heroic actions while serving in Ramadi, Iraq, in 2006. As noted in the Medal of Honor official citation, "by his undaunted courage, fighting spirit, and unwavering devotion to duty in the face of certain death, Petty Officer Monsoor gallantly gave his life for his country, thereby reflecting great credit upon himself and upholding the highest traditions of the United States Naval Service."

The USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) is the second ship of the DDG 1000 Zumwalt-class destroyers. Construction on the ship began in March 2010. The Michael Monsoor is currently over 60 percent complete and is scheduled to be delivered in 2016.

The USS Michael Monsoor (DDG 1001) will be a multi-mission surface combatant tailored for advanced land attack and littoral dominance. The ship's mission is to provide credible, independent forward presence and deterrence and to operate as an integral part of naval, joint or combined maritime forces. The ship will be 610 feet in length, have a beam of 80.7 feet and displace approximately 15,000 tons. 

As one of the Defense Department's largest acquisition organizations, PEO Ships, an affiliated PEO of the Naval Sea Systems Command, is responsible for executing the development and procurement of all major surface combatants, amphibious ships, special mission and support ships, and special warfare craft.

Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis transferred to Bangladesh Navy


Capt. Mohammad Nazmul Karim Kislu leads a formation of Bangladesh navy sailors during the transfer and decommissioning ceremony of the Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis held on Coast Guard Island, Thursday May 23, 2013. The Jarvis was commissioned in 1972 and will be transferred to the Bangladesh navy as the BNS Somudro Joy. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Pamela J. Boehland)  Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/image/939593/san-francisco-bay-area-media-bangladesh-media#.UZ6QgHChClI#ixzz2U9hQXYJE
Capt. Mohammad Nazmul Karim Kislu heads a formation of Bangladesh navy sailors during the transfer and decommissioning ceremony of the Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis held on Coast Guard Island in Alameda, Calif., Thursday, May 23, 2013. The Jarvis was commissioned in 1972 and will be transferred to the Bangladesh navy as the BNS Somudra Joy. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Pamela J. Boehland


U.S. Coast Guard Vice Adm. Paul F. Zukunft, Pacific Area commander and Chief of Naval Staff for the Bangladesh navy, Vice Adm. Muhammad Farid Habib sign the official paperwork to transfer the Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis to the Bangladesh navy during a decommissioning and transfer ceremony held on Coast Guard Island in Alameda, Calif., Thursday, May 23, 213. The Jarvis was commissioned in 1972 and became the BNS Somudra Joy. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Pamela J. Boehland)   Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/image/939590/coast-guard-cutter-jarvis-decommissioning-and-transfer-ceremony#.UZ6Qx3ChClI#ixzz2U9hirsJD
U.S. Coast Guard Vice Adm. Paul F. Zukunft, Pacific Area commander, and Vice Adm. Muhammad Farid Habib, Chief of Naval Staff for the Bangladesh navy, sign the official paperwork to transfer the Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis to the Bangladesh navy during a decommissioning and transfer ceremony held on Coast Guard Island in Alameda, Calif., Thursday, May 23, 2013. The Jarvis was commissioned in 1972 and became the BNS Somudra Joy. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Pamela J. Boehland

Crew members of the BNS Somudra Joy, a Bangladesh navy ship, and the former U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis hoist the Bangladesh flag on the stern of the ship following the official transfer ceremony held on Coast Guard Island, Thursday May 23, 2013. Commissioned in 1972, Jarvis is the fourth in its class of high endurance cutters to be decommissioned to make room for the Coast Guard's new National Security Cutters. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Pamela J. Boehland)  Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/image/939722/coast-guard-cutter-jarvis-transfer-and-decommissioning-ceremony#.UZ6RKnChClI#ixzz2U9iG0rlB
Crew members of the BNS Somudra Joy, a Bangladesh navy ship and the former U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis, hoist the Bangladesh flag on the stern of the ship following the official transfer ceremony held on Coast Guard Island in Alameda, Calif., Thursday May 23, 2013. Commissioned in 1972, Jarvis is the fourth in its class of High Endurance Cutters to be decommissioned. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Pamela J. Boehland

Crew members of the BNS Somudra Joy, a Bangladesh navy ship and the former U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis, march to the ship during the official transfer ceremony held on Coast Guard Island, Thursday May 23, 2013. Commissioned in 1972, the Jarvis is the fourth in its class of high endurance cutters to be decommissioned to make room for the Coast Guard's new National Security Cutters. (U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Pamela J. Boehland)  Read more: http://www.dvidshub.net/image/939592/coast-guard-cutter-jarvis-decommissioning-and-transfer-ceremony#.UZ6RjnChClI#ixzz2U9icbyMe
Crew members of the BNS Somudra Joy, a Bangladesh navy ship and the former U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis, march to the ship during the official transfer ceremony held on Coast Guard Island, Alameda, Calif., Thursday, May 23, 2013. Commissioned in 1972, the Jarvis was the fourth in its class of High Endurance Cutters to be decommissioned to be replaced by National Security Cutters. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 2nd Pamela J. Boehland

ALAMEDA, Calif. — The Coast Guard Cutter Jarvis, a 378-foot High Endurance Cutter homeported in Alameda, was decommissioned and transferred to the Bangladesh navy as the BNS Somudra Joy during a ceremony on Coast Guard Island in Alameda Thursday. 
A 20-member team from the Bangladesh navy, led by prospective commanding officer Capt. Mohammad Nazmul Karim Kislu, arrived in Alameda in March to begin preparations to receive the Jarvis. An additional 70 members of the Bangladesh crew arrived in May. Until the BNS Sumudra Joy's departure from California later this year, 26 former Jarvis crew members will serve as advisors and assist the Bangladesh crew.
Commissioned in 1972, the Jarvis was the fourth in its class of High Endurance Cutters to be replaced by the National Security Cutters.

Department of Defense Announces Selected Acquisition Report


The Department of Defense (DoD) has released details on major defense acquisition program cost, schedule, and performance changes since the December 2011 reporting period.  This information is based on the Selected Acquisition Reports (SARs) submitted to the Congress for the December 2012 reporting period.  
SARs summarize the latest estimates of cost, schedule and performance status.  These reports are prepared annually in conjunction with the submission of the President's Budget.  Subsequent quarterly exception reports are required only 
for those programs experiencing unit cost increases of at least 15 percent or schedule delays of at least six months.  Quarterly SARs are also submitted for initial reports, final reports, and for programs that are rebaselined at major-milestone decisions.
The total program cost estimates provided in the SARs include research and development, procurement, military construction, and acquisition-related operation and maintenance.  Total program costs reflect actual costs to date as well as future anticipated costs.  All estimates are shown in fully inflated then-year dollars.
The current estimate of program acquisition costs for programs covered by SARs for the prior reporting period (December 2011) was $1,617,549.2 million.  Final reports submitted for the annual December 2011 and for the March 2012, June 2012, and September 2012 quarterly exception reporting periods were subtracted.  Initial reports for the annual December 2011 and for the March 2012, June 2012 and September 2012 quarterly exception reporting periods were added.  Finally, the net cost changes for March 2012, June 2012 and September 2012 quarterly exception reporting periods were incorporated.         
Current Estimate
($ in Millions)
December 2011 (83 programs)
$ 1,617,549.2
Less final reports on AIM-9X Block I, C-130 Avionics Modernization Program (AMP), Chemical Demilitarization-Chemical Materials Agency (Chem Demil-CMA), Cobra Judy Replacement, High Mobility Artillery Rocket System (HIMARS), Joint Tactical Radio System Ground Mobile Radio (JTRS-GMR), Multi-Platform Radar Technology Insertion Program (MP-RTIP), National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS), Stryker, Thermal Weapon Sight(TWS), and Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T) Increment 1
-61,541.1
Plus initial reports on AIM-9X Block II, Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV), Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar (G/ATOR), Paladin Integrated Management (PIM), Ship to Shore Connector (SSC), and Thermal Weapon Sight(TWS)
+59,377.2
Net cost changes reported as of March 2012, June 2012 and September 2012 quarterly exception SARs
-1,084.6
Changes Since Last Report:
               Economic
$ +21,816.4
               Quantity
+21,615.6
               Schedule
+436.3
               Engineering
-29.9
               Estimating
-2,561.4
               Other
0.0
               Support
-1,659.3
Net Cost Change
$ +39,617.7
 Plus Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) development, procurement, and construction funding for Fiscal Year (FY) 2018; previous reports limited total funding through FY 2017

+7,064.9

December 2012 (78 programs)

$ 1,660,983.3

         For the December 2012 reporting period, there is a net cost increase of $39,617.7 million or
+2.44 percent for the 78 programs that have reported previously in SARs.  This cost increase is due primarily to the application of higher escalation rates (+$21,816.4 million), a net increase in planned quantities to be purchased (+$21,615.6 million), and a net stretch-out of development and procurement schedules (+$436.3 million).  These increases were partially offset by net decreases in program cost estimates (-$2,561.4 million), engineering changes to hardware/ software (-$29.9 million) and reductions in associated support requirements (-$1,659.3 million).

New SARs
         DoD is submitting initial SARs for the following programs as of the December 2012 reporting period.  These reports do not represent cost growth.  The baselines established on these programs will be the point from which future changes will be measured.


Program
Current Estimate
($ in Millions)
Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) Block 40/45 Upgrade
$2,753.1
B61 Modification 12 Life Extension Program (LEP) Tailkit Assembly (TKA)
+1,451.8 
Global Positioning System's Next Generation Operational Control System (GPS OCX)   
+3,412.4
Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV)
+31,108.2
Total

$ 38,725.5

 Summary Explanations of Selected[1]SAR Cost Changes
(As of December 31, 2012)
 Army:
AH-64E Apache New Build ? Program costs increased $328.7 million (+15.3 percent) from $2,155.8 million to $2,484.5 million, due primarily to a stretch-out of the procurement buy profile (+$260.0 million).  Since Milestone C in September 2010, 46 of the 56 AH-64E New Build aircraft have been shifted outside the Future Year Defense Program to higher priority programs.  There were additional increases for other support (+$78.5 million) and initial spares (+$26.6 million) to reflect a revised Independent Cost Estimate by Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation (CAPE) in support of full rate production approval in March 2013.  These increases were partially offset by a quantity decrease of two Overseas Contingency Operations-funded aircraft from 58 to 56 aircraft (-$111.2 million) and associated schedule and estimating allocations* ($+46.3 million).
 AH-64E Apache Remanufacture ? Program costs increased $1,791.9 million (+15.0 percent) from $11,968.3 million to $13,760.2 million, due primarily to reflect a revised Independent Cost Estimate (ICE) by CAPE in support of Full Rate Production (FRP) approval in September 2012 (+$1,339.5M).  There were additional increases for other support (+$347.8 million) and initial spares (+$151.0 million) to reflect the approved CAPE FRP ICE.
 UH-60M Black Hawk Helicopter? Program costs decreased $3,166.8 million (-11.0 percent) from $28,860.6 million to $25,693.8 million, due primarily to incorporation of Multi-Year VIII contracting with resulting cost savings (-$3,325.5 million), a net overall acceleration of the procurement buy schedule (-$123.7 million) and a reduction in engineering change orders (-$99.5 million).  These decreases were partially offset by revised escalation indices (+$394.0 million).
 Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T) Increment 2 ? Program costs decreased $1,323.9 million (-20.5 percent) from $6,461.3 million to $5,137.4 million, due primarily to a quantity decrease of 690 nodes from 2,790 to 2,100 nodes to align with the capability sets (-$1,115.8 million) and associated schedule and estimating allocations* (+$38.8 million).  Other decreases were due to the removal of the Armored Brigade Combat Team recurring A-Kit costs (-$150.8 million), a decrease in initial spares resulting from the decrease of 690 nodes (-$107.6 million), and decreases in fielding, new equipment training, and software maintenance resulting from 690 fewer nodes (-$83.5 million).  These decreases were partially offset by an increase due to revised escalation indices (+$82.7 million) and increases resulting from additional costs for follow-on operational test and evaluation; platform certification testing; initial operational testing; and joint command, control, communications, computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance radio production qualification testing (+$70.4 million).
 Warfighter Information Network-Tactical (WIN-T) Increment 3 ? Program costs increased $3,434.6 million (+23.8 percent) from $14,455.5 million to $17,890.1 million, due primarily to a procurement quantity increase of 404 nodes from 3,045 to 3,449 nodes (+$1,232.4 million) and associated schedule, engineering, and estimating allocations* (-$497.7 million), and a development quantity increase of 25 nodes from 39 to 64 nodes (+$158.2 million) for limited user testing.  Additional increases related to the increase of 404 procurement nodes include:  fielding, new equipment training and hardware end of life (technology refresh) (+$1,556.1 million), software licenses (+$230.9 million), initial spares requirements (+$99.5 million), and engineering change orders for hardware procurement (+$79.1 million).  There were other increases attributable to updates to the systems engineering and program management cost estimate (+$322.7 million) and the application of revised escalation indices (+$302.4 million).  These increases were partially offset by decreases resulting from descoping of the Point of Presence-Command and Modular Communication Node-Global Information Grid Interface (-$42.8 million) and a reduction in development engineering due to leveraging of the WIN-T Increment 2 design (-$42.5 million).
Navy:
CH-53K Heavy Lift Replacement Helicopter ? Program costs increased $1,897.6 million (+7.1 percent) from $26,626.8 million to $28,524.4 million, due primarily to changing the cost estimating methodology from analogy-based to supplier bottom-up (+$1,796.6 million), use of commercial indices for materiel escalation costs (+$948.9 million), revised escalation indices (+$539.4 million), an increase in the production line shutdown estimate (+$120.7 million), and an increase in support equipment, repair of repairables, and spares costs (+$64.9 million).  These increases were partially offset by decreases in other support costs (-$664.0 million), initial spares requirements (-$589.0 million), and the application of new inflation indices (-$385.3 million).
 DDG 51 Arleigh Burke Class Guided Missile Destroyer? Program costs increased $3,896.8 million (+4.5 percnet) from $87,337.6 million to $91,234.4 million, due primarily to a quantity increase of two ships from 75 to 77 ships (+$2,686.5 million) and associated schedule, engineering, and estimating allocations* (+$1,271.3 million).  Additional increases were attributable to the application of revised escalation indices (+$738.1 million), incorporation of the Advanced Capability Build (ACB) 16 upgrades for improved radar and ballistic missile defense capability and electronic warfare (+$348.7 million), revised air and missile defense radar estimate to reflect near-term efficiencies and continued outyear support of Flight III integration (+$208.1 million), and procurement of ACB 16 baseline upgrades for DDG 119 and follow ships and additional updated Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) systems to resolve obsolescence and reliability issues (+$102.8 million).  These increases were partially offset by decreases resulting from revised estimates for ship construction and GFE associated with multi-year procurement (FY 2013 to FY 2017) and program efficiencies (-$715.7 million), the application of new outyear escalation indices (-$447.0 million), and adjustments for current and prior escalation (-$282.8 million).
 EA-18G Growler Aircraft? Program costs increased $2,023.9 million (+18.3 percent) from $11,060.3 million to $13,084.2 million, due primarily to a quantity increase of 21 aircraft from 114 to 135 aircraft (+$1,752.1 million) and associated schedule and estimating allocations* (-$60.7 million).  There were also increases in support costs for integrated logistics support/reliability demonstration, production engineering, and developmental testing) (+$306.6 million).
 Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar (G/ATOR)? Program costs decreased $912.1 million (-27.4 percent) from $3,325.9 million to $2,413.8 million, due primarily to a decrease in quantity of 12 systems from 57 to 45 systems (-$464.0 million) and associated estimating allocation* (+$0.9 million) and a revised cost estimate for anticipated production efficiencies associated with funded design investments (-$447.0 million).  Other decreases were attributable to a reduction in support costs (-$52.2 million) and initial spares requirements (-$12.9 million) resulting from investment in efficiencies and economic order discounts.  These decreases were partially offset by increases to the cost estimates for investments in the production efficiency initiative (+$33.3 million) and technology refresh assumptions and associated potential future change orders (+$18.8 million), and the application of revised escalation indices (+$27.5 million).
 Integrated Defensive Electronic Countermeasures (IDECM)? The IDECM program is comprised of two subprograms, Blocks 2/3 and Block 4.  Only the Blocks 2/3 subprogram had selected cost changes in the December 2012 SAR.
IDECM Blocks 2/3 ? Subprogram costs increased $187.3 million (+11.3 percent) from $1,663.2 million to $1,850.5 million, due primarily to a revised estimate to reflect actual costs (+$122.0 million), a stretch-out of the procurement buy profile for the ALE-55 fiber-optic towed decoy from FY 2041 to FY 2045 (+$49.7 million), and revised escalation indices (+$25.1 million).
 Joint Precision Approach and Landing System (JPALS) Increment 1A  ? Program costs increased $106.8 million (+10.7 percent) from $996.0 million to $1,102.8 million, due primarily to additional engineering effort for algorithm refinement and development of an alternate configuration for the JPALS Inc 1A ship system variant, resulting in a smaller footprint for air capable ships (small combatants) (+$84.5 million).  Additional increases were attributable to an extension of the procurement and installation profile from FY 2018 to FY 2020 (+$15.3 million) and a related increase in support costs (+$2.3 million), as well as a quantity increase of one system from 26 to 27 systems (+$7.5 million) and associated estimating allocation* (-$1.4 million).  These increases were offset by a decrease in initial spares requirements (-$1.5 million).
 Littoral Combat Ship (LCS)? Program costs decreased $3,485.0 million (-9.3 percent) from $37,440.5 million to $33,955.5 million, due primarily to the decision to purchase three fewer ships resulting in a quantity decrease from 53 to 50 ships (-$2,945.7 million) and associated schedule and estimating allocations* (+$150.0 million).  Additional decreases were attributable to the application of new outyear escalation indices ($-1,050.6 million), realignment of LCS in the 30-year shipbuilding plan in FY 2019 to FY 2034 (-$519.8 million), and adjustments to the seaframe requirements estimate in FY 2012 to FY 2018 (-$406.3 million).  These decreases were partially offset by the application of revised escalation indices (+1,216.4 million) and pricing changes for trainer and battle spare requirements (+$90.6 million).
 Multifunctional Information Distribution System (MIDS)? Program costs increased $325.8 million (10.8 percent) from $3,010.4 million to $3,336.2 million, due primarily to a quantity increase of 975 terminals from 5,258 to 6,233 terminals ($242.1 million).  There was also an increase to incorporate tactical targeting network technology into the MIDS Joint Tactical Radio System terminals ($74.8 million).
 Standard Missile-6 (SM-6)? Program costs increased $3,308.5 million (+51.2 percent) from $6,467.0 million to $9,775.5 million, due primarily to a quantity increase of 600 All Up Round (AUR) missiles from 1,200 to 1,800 (+$2,619.6 million) and associated schedule and estimating allocations* (-$79.5 million).  There were also increases in support costs (+$299.8 million) and initial spares requirements (+$120.0 million) resulting from the quantity increase and an extension of the procurement profile to FY 2024.  Additional increases were attributable to the application of new escalation indices (+$141.6 million), the loss of learning in the Future Years Defense Program and outyears due to a quantity reduction in FY 2014 (+$95.7 million), revised     escalation indices (+$64.2 million), and the stretch-out of procurement buy profile from FY 2020 to FY 2024 (+$45.4 million).
 SSN 774 Virginia Class Submarine? Program costs decreased $1,428.8 million (-1.5 percent) from $93,276.2 million to $91,847.4 million, due primarily to a scheduling change in which a submarine that was to be purchased in FY 2020 will now begin construction in FY 2014 (the tenth ship of the multi-year procurement block buy) (-$1,845.3 million), the application of new outyear escalation indices (-$1,274.0 million), adjustments for current and prior escalation calculations (-$483.0 million), and a reduction in the estimate for the Virginia Class total ownership cost reduction program (-$133.0 million).  These decreases were partially offset by the application of revised escalation indices (+$1,794.8 million) and the addition of advance procurement in FY 2018 to fund class extension (+$591.8 million).
 V-22 Osprey Joint Services Advanced Vertical Lift Aircraft? Program costs increased $1,567.3 million (2.9 percent) from $53,494.5 million to $55,061.8 million, due primarily to a stretch-out of the procurement buy profile of 52 aircraft from FY 2018-2019 to FY 2020-2022 (+$1,008.2 million), the application of revised escalation indices (+$345.2 million), increases in other support costs due to the change in the procurement profile (+$131.3 million), and the addition of an improved inlet for increased Time on Wing (+$91.5 million).  Other increases were attributed to beyond-Future Years Defense Program costs for follow-on test and evaluation (+$90.9 million), revised estimates to reflect actual costs (+$68.6 million), updated estimates for government furnished equipment, engine, ancillary, and non-recurring costs (+$66.9 million), and incorporation of production shutdown costs (+$55.5 million).  These increases were partially offset by the application of new inflation indices (-$192.0 million) and adjustments for current and prior escalation (-$80.2 million).
 Air Force:
Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) Satellite? The AEHF program is comprised of two subprograms, Space Vehicles 1-4 and Space Vehicles 5-6.  Only the Space Vehicles 5-6 subprogram had selected cost changes in the December 2012 SAR.
AEHF Space Vehicles 5-6 ? Subprogram costs decreased $510.4 million (-14.6 percent) from $3,488.2 million to $2,977.8 million, due primarily to a reduced estimate to reflect program efficiencies for production and launch operations for Space Vehicles 5-6 (-$507.1 million).  The savings were applied to higher Air Force needs.
 Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV)? Program costs increased $35,717.0 million (+102.1 percent) from $34,968.1 million to $70,685.1 million, due primarily to a quantity increase of 60 launch services from 91 to 151 launch services (+$16,040.5 million) resulting from an extension of the launch manifest from FY 2018 to FY 2028 and the program life extension from FY 2020 to FY 2030 that was directed in Space Command's Strategic Master Plan (+$20,987.5 million).  These increases incorporate cost saving methodologies implemented in the revised contracting strategy, to include incentivizing the contractor, enabling the government to implement cost cutting initiatives during technical evaluations and contract negotiations,  improving insight into the contractors' costs, and enforcing better cost management.  These increases were partially offset by cost savings realized in the FY 2014 President's Budget Future Years Defense Program due to a revised acquisition strategy and other initiatives (-$1,671.6 million).
 Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile Baseline (JASSM)? The JASSM program is comprised of two subprograms, JASSM Baseline and JASSM-Extended Range (ER).  Both subprograms had selected cost changes in the December 2012 SAR.
JASSM Baseline ? Subprogram costs decreased $641.5 million (-18.0 percent) from $3,555.6 million to $2,914.1 million, due primarily to a quantity reduction of 447 missiles from 2,400 to 1,953 missiles (-$313.0 million) and associated schedule, engineering, and estimating allocations* (-$198.0 million).  There were additional decreases related to the movement of all support requirements from the JASSM Baseline subprogram to the JASSM-Extended Range (ER) subprogram starting in FY 2017, since the JASSM Baseline program ends in FY 2016 (-$210.9 million).  These decreases were partially offset by the reallocation of development work from the JASSM-ER subprogram to the JASSM Baseline subprogram (+$48.9 million).
JASSM-ER ? Subprogram costs increased $653.6 million (+17.4 percent) from $3,750.5 million to $4,404.1 million, due primarily to a quantity increase of 447 missiles from 2,500 to 2,947 missiles (+$436.6 million) and associated schedule, engineering, and estimating allocations*
 (+$108.1 million).  There were additional increases in support, since the JASSM program will transition to an all JASSM-ER missile in FY 2017. All support funding from the JASSM Baseline program transitioned to the JASSM-ER program between FY 2017 to FY 2035 (+$193.5 million).
 DoD:
Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS)? Program costs decreased $1,124.3 million (-0.8 percent) from $133,271.0 million to $132,146.7 million, due primarily to a restructuring of the Aegis Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block IIB program (-$1,679.0 million), cancellation of the Precision Tracking Space Sensor (PTSS) program (-$1,171.7 million), an adjustment to the Aegis SM-3 Block IB missile ramp-up rates(-$466.0 million), and a FY 2012 reduction to Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) interceptors to align with production capacity (-$104.5 million).  These decreases were partially offset by the application of revised escalation indices (+$382.5 million), additional ground-based interceptors to implement the Ground-Based Midcourse Homeland Hedge Strategy (+$591.8 million), advanced technology/risk reduction efforts (+$489.0 million), and establishment of the Common Kill Vehicle program (+$280.6 million).  There were additional increases for Sea-Based X-band (SBX) radar limited test support (+$145.7 million), the Iron Dome Missile Defense System (+$396.3 million), and AN/TPY-2 radar spares (+$159.6 million). [Note:  In addition to the cost changes above, $7,064.9 million ofdevelopment, procurement, and construction funding for FY 2018 was added to the BMDS program; previous reports limited total funding through FY 2017. This adjustment is not considered cost growth.]
 F-35 Joint Strike Fighter? The F-35 program is comprised of two subprograms, Aircraft and Engine.  Only the Aircraft subprogram had selected cost changes in the December 2012 SAR; however, the cost changes for the Engine subprogram are also provided.
F-35 Aircraft  ? Subprogram costs decreased -$4,942.4 million (-1.5 percent) from $331,855.2 million to $326,912.8 million, due primarily to decreases in the prime contractor and subcontractor labor rates (-$7,853.3 million) and revised airframe and subcontractor estimates that incorporate the latest actual costs from early Low Rate Initial Production (LRIP) lots (-$1,121.3 million).  There were additional decreases to correct cost allocations between the aircraft and engine subprograms that were established in the December 2011 SAR (-$981.0 million), lower estimates of required risk for initial spares (-$698.3 million), other support reductions due to maturation of the technical     baseline and further definition of customer requirements and Service beddown plans (-$1,032.9 million).  These decreases were partially offset by the application of revised escalation indices (+$7,016.4 million).
F-35 Engine ? Subprogram costs increased $442.1 million (+0.7 percent) from $63,856.6 million to $64,298.7 million, due primarily to revised escalation indices (+$1,301.3 million), correction of cost allocations between the aircraft and engine subprograms (+$981.0 million), and a lower near-term ramp that extended completion from FY 2029 to FY 2032 (+$230.7 million).  These increases were partially offset by revised estimates to incorporate the latest actual costs from early LRIP lots (-$848.8 million), outyear offsets of new escalation indices (-$865.2 million), and lower estimates of required risk for initial spares (-$362.9 million). 
 * Note:  Quantity changes are estimated based on the original SAR baseline cost-quantity relationship.  Cost changes since the original baseline are separately categorized as schedule, engineering, or estimating "allocations."  The total impact of a quantity change is the identified "quantity" change plus all associated "allocations."