Friday, May 30, 2014

Rockwell Collins part of Collier Award-winning U.S. Navy, Northrop Grumman X-47B UCAS-D team

Pictured from left: Rob Hughes, principal marketing manager; LeAnn Ridgeway, vice president and general manager, Simulation and Training Solutions; Eileen Leonhardy, principal account manager; Jody Wilkerson, principal account manager; and Rick Tomy senior director, Airborne Communication Products. 

Cedar Rapids IA May 30, 2014 – Rockwell Collins is a member of the X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System Demonstration (UCAS-D) team, which received the 2013 Robert J. Collier Trophy at a ceremony Thursday night. The National Aeronautic Association (NAA) presented aviation’s highest honor to the team, which is comprised of leaders in government, business and industry.
The NAA voting committee recognized the U.S. Navy, Northrop Grumman and industry partners for “developing and demonstrating the first unmanned, autonomous air system operating from an aircraft carrier.”
Rockwell Collins’ Tactical Targeting Network Technology (TTNT) and ARC-210 radio are part of the X-47B architecture and play essential roles in helping the aircraft perform vital functions.
“We’re proud that TTNT and the ARC-210 played a role in helping the X-47B UCAS-D team achieve this most prestigious of aviation awards,” said Phil Jasper, executive vice president and chief operating officer, Government Systems, for Rockwell Collins.
The TTNT scalable ad hoc network provides users an extremely fast means to move critically important information between network nodes at very high data rates over long ranges. Minimal preplanning is necessary, so TTNT users easily enter and exit the network. This reliable and secure IP-based networking capability for manned and unmanned platforms complements other communication and tactical data link capabilities.
With more than 35,000 fielded units, the ARC-210 is the most widely used airborne radio in the Department of Defense, and continues to provide the warfighter with the latest communications capabilities. The latest ARC-210 radio features a software-defined Multi-Waveform Architecture, which is an optimized Software Communications Architecture with embedded programmable next generation crypto, a classified Ethernet data interface, and an extended frequency range to 941 MHz.
On May 14, 2013, the X-47B was the first unmanned, tailless aircraft to catapult launch from an aircraft carrier, the USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77). Three days later, the aircraft made the first carrier-based touch-and-go landings. On July 10, 2013, the X-47B made history again on CVN 77 by being the first unmanned, tailless aircraft to make an arrested landing aboard a carrier.
Conferred annually, the Collier Trophy recognizes one team or individual who has made "the greatest achievement in aeronautics or astronautics in America" during the previous year. Past recipients of the trophy include: Howard Hughes (1938), Neil Armstrong (1969), the B-2 (1991), Global Hawk (2000) and SpaceShipOne (2004).

UTC Aerospace Systems contributes to Collier Award Winner X-47B Unmanned Combat Air System

Northrop Grumman
Charlotte May 30, 2014 - The U.S. Navy, Northrop Grumman and its supplier team - including UTC Aerospace Systems - have been honored with the 2013 Robert J. Collier Trophy for the development of the X-47B, the first unmanned, autonomous air system operating from an aircraft carrier. The National Aeronautic Association presented the award on May 29 in Washington, D.C. UTC Aerospace Systems is a unit of United Technologies Corp. (UTX).
UTC Aerospace Systems content on the X-47B includes wheels and brakes; a number of sensors, including the air data pressure sensors; the power take-off shaft, which powers the Aircraft Mounted Accessory Drive (AMAD) gearbox; and backup electrical systems and  the exterior lighting, which includes position lights, deck operator lights and taxi/landing lights.
In May 2013, the sleek, tailless aircraft made a catapult launch from USS George H.W. Bush and made history again two months later by being the first unmanned, tailless aircraft to make an arrested landing aboard a carrier.
"We are very proud to provide a number of key systems on the X-47B," said Gail Baker, UTC Aerospace Systems vice president, Aerospace Customers & Business Development. "Our company congratulates the U.S. Navy and Northrop Grumman for this extraordinary accomplishment."
The Collier Trophy is awarded annually by the U.S. National Aeronautic Association "for the greatest achievement in aeronautics or astronautics in America, with respect to improving the performance, efficiency, and safety of air or space vehicles, the value of which has been thoroughly demonstrated by actual use during the preceding year." It is named for Robert J. Collier, publisher of Collier's Weekly magazine, who was an air sports pioneer and president of the Aero Club of America.  

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Roger Easton, Father of GPS, Dies at 93

Washington May 29, 2014 - Roger Lee Easton, Sr., visionary, inventor, and pioneer of modern day navigation passed away Thursday, May 8, 2014 at his Wheelock Terrace residence located in Hanover, New Hampshire.
“The only thing worse than losing would be winning.”
Born April 30, 1921, in North Craftsbury, Vt., to Frank Birch Easton, Sr. and Della (Donnocker) Easton, he was raised in Craftsbury Common and graduated from the Craftsbury Academy in 1939. He was a member of the class of 1943 at Middlebury College. After graduation he attended the University of Michigan for one semester where he met his wife Barbara.
In 1943 Easton began work as a physicist at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in Washington, DC, where he spent his entire 37-year career. During 1944 and 1945 he served in the U.S. Navy while working at the laboratory on radar beacons and blind landing systems. In the early 1950s he was involved in early rocket experiments carried out at the White Sands Proving Grounds in N.M.
In 1955 he assisted in writing the proposal for the Vanguard Project, a scientific satellite program for the International Geophysical Year (IGY), and served on the design team for that satellite. From there he went on to design Minitrack, a system for following varying types of Earth-orbiting objects.
A problem with synchronizing the timing of the tracking stations led Easton to the idea of putting highly accurate clocks in multiple satellites which could also be used to determine the precise location of someone on the ground. He called this system Timation for Time-Navigation. Following the origin and development of the NRL time-based navigation system, select features were adopted by the Department of Defense (DoD) in the early 1970s and the system renamed the Global Positioning System, or GPS.
Easton held 11 U.S. patents including patent 3,789,409 for “Navigation Systems Using Satellites and Passive Ranging Techniques” for Timation. He received many awards for his inventions and in 1978 was awarded the Thomas L. Thurlow navigation award for Timation. In 1993 he was recognized as a member of the GPS team which received the Robert J. Collier Trophy aviation award.
In 1997 Easton shared the Magellanic Premium given by the American Philosophical Society and was inducted into that organization in 1998. He was also awarded the National Medal of Technology for 2004 and inducted into the National Inventor’s Hall of Fame in 2010. In June 2013 he was awarded the Infomatics Badge of Honor by the Amir Sheikh Sabah Al-Ahmad Al-Jaber Al-Sabah of Kuwait.
In 1980 Easton retired as Head of the Space Applications Branch at the Naval Research Laboratory and he and Barbara moved to Canaan, N.H., where he continued efforts to improve GPS and to work on energy issues — a proponent of solar energy, Easton had installed solar cells on his garage roof. He served two terms in the New Hampshire Legislature and ran for Governor in the primary election of 1986 to offer a moderate alternative in the Republican Party and in opposition to the Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant. As he did throughout his life, he maintained his sense of humor in this campaign, telling his family that “The only thing worse than losing would be winning.”
Easton is survived by his wife of 68 years, Barbara Coulter Easton, daughter Ruth Easton, two sons Roger Easton, Jr. and Richard Easton and daughter-in-law Kathleen Easton of Winnetka, sister Penelope Easton of Durham, NC, five grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by daughters Ann Davis and Joan Dunleavy, half-brother Daniel and brothers Frank, Jr., Charles, and Nelson.

AF honors fallen hero with ship renaming

Captains David and Dana Lyon's with their dog, Colt. The Air Force named the service's newest pre-positioning vessel after Capt. David Lyon, who died Dec. 27, 2013, in Kabul, Afghanistan, when a vehicle-born improvised explosive device was detonated near his convoy. (Courtesy photo)

Washington May 28, 2014 - The Air Force decided May 23, to honor a fallen hero by naming the service’s newest pre-positioning vessel after Capt. David I. Lyon.
“It's a fitting tribute to have the Air Force’s newest pre-positioning vessel named after an Air Force logistician and true American patriot who paid the ultimate sacrifice in the service of his country,” said Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III. “Captain Lyon answered the call by saying ‘send me,’ and exemplified the core value of service before self. I'm extremely proud that this great airman's story will become part of the legacy of this proud ship and its crew."
Lyon, a U.S. Air Force Academy graduate and member of the 21st Logistics Readiness Squadron out of Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado, died Dec. 27, 2013 in Kabul, Afghanistan, when a vehicle-born improvised explosive device was detonated near his convoy. Serving a year-long deployment to Afghanistan, Lyon was performing a combat advisory mission with Afghan National army commandos and working with the Combined Joint Special Operations Task Force-Afghanistan.
Lyon was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star, Meritorious Service Medal, Purple Heart and the Air Force Combat Action Medal.
The dedication of the Motor Vessel David I. Lyon continues the long-standing tradition of the Navy’s Military Sealift Command by having a ship dedicated to national heroes. Lyon is the fifth Airman to receive this honor.
The MV David I. Lyon will provide responsive and agile combat support by prepositioning munitions afloat within theaters of operation in support of multiple combatant commander war-fighting and operational plan requirements. The MV David I. Lyon will provide enduring capacity for sea-based munitions movement equivalent to 78 fully loaded C-17 Globemaster III cargo aircraft.
While Lyon was working in Afghanistan, his wife, Capt. Dana Lyon was serving at Bagram Airfield.
When told about the decision to honor her husband with the ship renaming, she said she “was in awe and deeply honored.”
“It is quite an honor that the logistics community and the Air Force recognized the man I knew him to be … humble and selfless,” she said. “Dave’s favorite thing about being in the Air Force was feeling like he was in the fight and making a difference in the world. He would be very much honored and happy about having this vessel named after him because it allows him to still deliver to the warfighter … his legacy will live on and the mission will continue despite him being gone.”

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

WindSentinel ready for US Navy validation of floating LiDAR

US Navy photo
 
Sidney BC May 28, 2014 - AXYS Technologies Inc (AXYS) is pleased to announce it has completed pre-commissioning of a WindSentinel platform for the United States Navy project to validate an offshore floating LiDAR wind resource assessment system. AXYS teamed up with Sound & Sea Technology (SST) as well as DNV GL to secure the US Navy contract and supply the system. The LiDAR underwent an initial six month side by side testing process overseen by DNV GL in 2013. Upon passing this test the LiDAR was integrated onto the WindSentinel platform. 
AXYS and SST personnel assisted in the commissioning of the WindSentinel platform the week of May 12th in Port Hueneme, California. The WindSentinel is now ready for deployment and waiting the final deployment location to be determined by the US Navy.
AXYS supplied the WindSentinel floating LiDAR system, which accurately measures offshore wind speed and direction up to the blade-tip heights of 200m. The WindSentinel has recorded a number of world firsts, including the first commercial deployment and the most remote LiDAR offshore wind resource assessment ever conducted, 36 miles offshore. 
Sound & Sea Technology will provide overall management of the program, coordination with the Navy, ocean engineering expertise, environmental planning and installation support.  
DNV GL will provide an independent evaluation of the validity of the floating LiDAR system by identifying measurement requirements and metrics to qualify the system for use in wind power development. These metrics will be adapted from DNV GL’s recommended practice for validating LIDAR measurements, “DNV Sodar and Lidar Guidelines.” 
Sound & Sea, Inc. is a Woman-Owned small business with offices in Lynnwood and Poulsbo WA, Ventura and San Diego CA and Washington DC.  SST provides ocean engineering expertise to the U. S. Navy, other government agencies, the marine renewable energy industry and the undersea telecommunications industry.  For further information, contact SST at info@soundandsea.com or visit www.soundandsea.com. 
DNV GL’s team of over 150 wind energy professionals has been supporting and actively involved in the wind industry for more than 20 years. Their wind energy segment specializes in providing feasibility consulting, analysis, design, testing, management, certification, and verification services to a wide range of wind industry clients. DNV GL’s experience includes utility-scale and small-scale applications of onshore and offshore wind energy technologies. Their personnel have worked on wind projects in more than 40 U.S. states and 30 countries. 

Imtech Marine awarded connectivity contract including VSAT by Northern Lighthouse Board for 5 ships

Northern Lighthouse Board

Rotterdam May 28, 2014 - Imtech Marine has been awarded a three-year contract by Northern Lighthouse Board to provide VSAT systems with connectivity and value added services. The contract also includes maintenance services for the five vessels operated by Northern Lighthouse Board and Trinity House in the UK. The five vessels maintain safe shipping lanes around the Scottish and English sectors of the British Isles coastline. The solutions provided by Imtech Marine will enhance the vessel operations and improve crew welfare by offering a reliable internet connection and communication. The value added services include a solution which efficiently separates business and crew usage.
Imtech Marine will also provide remote VSAT monitoring support on all five vessels. The on-board networks can be remotely accessed and supported by the customer’s IT department via the VSAT system. Next to this, the vessels will have a first line of fault reporting via the Imtech Marine Global Technical Assistance Centers (GTAC). Through GTAC, Imtech Marine monitors the vessels’ systems remotely around the clock, enabling early detection of problems and the remote correction of system faults.
In the port of Southampton the Trinity House vessel Patricia was the first of the five to have the connectivity solution of Imtech Marine installed.
Imtech Marine presently supports VSAT communication systems on over 300 ships operating worldwide, providing continuous remote monitoring of these satellite communication links via the Imtech Marine Global Technical Assistance Centers in Rotterdam, Singapore and Houston. Imtech Marine has over 100 service locations worldwide providing skilled VSAT technicians and spares to support customers operating globally.

Lockheed Martin Awarded Additional C4ISR Contract To Support The U.S. Coast Guard


Moorestown NJ May 28, 2014 - Lockheed Martin received a $69 million contract to support the United States Coast Guard's efforts to enforce maritime sovereignty and address at-sea threats.
Through this contract received from Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII), Lockheed Martin will provide the Command, Control, Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) system for the United States Coast Guard's seventh National Security Cutter (NSC), the future USCGC Kimball.
Lockheed Martin's C4ISR system offers comprehensive, real-time situational awareness, commonality and interoperability, which enables a greater collection and sharing of maritime data. It allows the crew to see vessels in distress or targets of interest; collaborate with other Coast Guard air, sea and land assets; and act on the most current information available.
"The NSC's C4ISR system is critical to ensuring the USCG can support the nation's maritime strategy," said Joe Buss, program director of Lockheed Martin's Coast Guard and Mission Control Systems. "Our brave men and women of the Coast Guard rely on the accuracy and timeliness of the data our system provides to achieve their many missions and maritime operations."
Lockheed Martin has a rich legacy in supporting the Coast Guard, and has provided the C4ISR systems to all six of the NSCs. The NSC is the largest and most technologically advanced multi-mission cutter in the Coast Guard fleet, with capabilities to support the service's homeland security, law enforcement, marine safety, environmental protection and national defense missions.

CTF-150 ship seizes $22.4m heroin in Arabian Sea

May 28, 2014 - HMS Somerset, supporting Combined Task Force (CTF) 150, has seized an $22.4m (USD) haul of heroin after a raid on a suspect vessel in the northern Arabian Sea.

HMS Somerset with suspicious dhow in the foreground.

The 55.7 kilograms of drugs were seized by sailors and Royal Marines from Plymouth-based HMS Somerset who intercepted the fishing dhow in fast RHIB dinghies.

55.7 kilograms of heroin from the dhow on HMS Somerset’s flight deck.


HMS Somerset’s crew found the dhow, a type of vessel common to the Middle East and Indian Ocean, on Sunday afternoon, during an operation for the Combined Maritime Forces (CMF).
CTF-150 is currently commanded by Royal Navy Commodore Jeremy Blunden, and his team of 24 Royal Navy personnel, from the CMF headquarters in Bahrain.

HMS Somerset’s Boarding Team approach the dhow with Lynx helicopter overhead.


HMS Somerset’s Lynx helicopter was launched to intercept the dhow and guide the boarding team to its exact location.
Once on board, the Royal Navy team worked tirelessly for 23 hours throughout the evening and overnight to find the contraband’s hiding place, stashed under a false deck.

A Royal Marine and a crewmember from HMS Somerset examine the seized heroin.


Afterwards, they brought the drugs on board HMS Somerset where they were tested for purity and then destroyed.
Captain Steve Taylor Royal Marines, the officer in charge of the boarding team, said: “Boarding is very unpredictable by its nature and you simply do not know what you will be faced with.

HMS Somerset’s Boarding Team approaches the suspicious dhow.


“The length of time it took to get this result makes it even sweeter and was a genuine whole-ship effort. This was an example of Somerset operating at her very best and achieving results.”
Lieutenant Tom Loxton Royal Navy, another officer in the boarding team, said:
“This is a perfect outcome following 18 months of training and operations. The boarding was challenging and it took many hours to locate the well hidden stash but the team persevered and their patience was rewarded with the multi-million pound bust.”

HMS Somerset’s Boarding Team prepares to board the suspicious dhow.


CTF-150 is one of three international naval task forces operating under the CMF banner in the Middle East, which aim to counter terrorism, piracy and related illicit activity across more than 2.5 million square miles of ocean.
Commander Mike Smith Royal Navy, who is HMS Somerset’s Commanding Officer, said: “HMS Somerset’s success last night in intercepting a vessel smuggling heroin is a great example of what the Naval Service does best.
Commodore Jeremy Blunden Royal Navy hailed the British warship’s success.
He said: “I am delighted that HMS Somerset has made this intercept while CTF-150 is under UK command.  I offer my congratulations to Commander Smith and his team for finding this well hidden contraband in difficult conditions.
“This is the ninth seizure of heroin that CTF-150 has made this year as part of a determined effort to combat both the flow of heroin across the Arabian Sea and Indian Ocean to East Africa and funding to terrorist organisations. The destruction of the drugs will reduce key funding lines for known terror groups.”

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Navy and ECR Sign Agreement to Protect Boardman Airspace

NWSTF Authorized Personnel

Washington May 1, 2014 - Officials from the Department of Defense, the Department of the Navy, and E.ON Climate and Renewables (EC&R) Development, LLC (EC&R), signed a memorandum of agreement (MOA) April 25, 2014, to avoid adverse impacts on Navy flight training from proposed wind turbines near Naval Weapons Systems Training Facility (NWSTF) Boardman in Oregon. The agreement ensures the continuation of the critical training mission in the vicinity of NWSTF Boardman and is the second such agreement between the Navy and EC&R.
"We are grateful to have had the opportunity to work with EC&R. They are supportive of the Navy mission and have demonstrated through their cooperation that the Navy's training and testing mission and energy development can be compatible," explained Mr. Roger Natsuhara, Principle Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Energy, Installations, and Environment (PDASN (EI&E)).
Signatories to the agreement include Acting Deputy Under Secretary of Defense Installations and Environment, Mr. John Conger; PDASN (EI&E), Mr. Roger Natsuhara; and EC&R Development, LLC Senior Vice President, Mr. Paul Bowman.
"As wind energy increasingly contributes to the nation's energy portfolio, it will be vital to maintain positive relationships with developers to protect critical Navy capabilities," said Rear Adm. Kevin Slates, Director of the Chief of Naval Operations Energy and Environmental Readiness Division. "We're pleased with the outcome of this agreement, and hope to use a similar approach as we work with other wind developers throughout the country."
EC&R proposed 223 wind turbines in Wasco and Sherman Counties, Oregon. Under the MOA, EC&R will relocate 29 proposed wind turbines that would have been within the Military Training Routes (MTR) leading to NWSTF Boardman. In addition, the agreement stipulates height restrictions of the transmission line to 120 feet above ground level. This will prevent interference with Navy flight training in the area.
Wind turbines located in close proximity to or within Navy airspace can interfere with critical training and testing as well as radar and telecommunications. In 2012, EC&R joined Navy in a MOA protecting the flight training mission at naval air stations Corpus Christi and Kingsville in Texas.
"We appreciate the relationship we've established with the U.S. Navy and Department of Defense," said Paul Bowman. "We hope to maintain this relationship and continue to work together to develop projects that are compatible with the Navy mission, while increasing the nation's renewable energy supply."

Northrop Grumman Selected to Provide Turbine Generator Units For US Navy's Ohio Replacement Submarine Program



Sunnyvale CA May 27, 2014 - Northrop Grumman Corporation has been awarded a contract by shipbuilder General Dynamics Electric Boat to complete detailed design and subsequent manufacturing, assembly, qualification and delivery of the first turbine generator units for the Ohio Replacement Program (ORP), the U.S. Navy's next-generation ballistic nuclear submarine. 
The turbine generators provide all of the submarine's propulsion and other electrical power requirements. The ORP represents the first Navy nuclear-powered submarine to incorporate electric drive since 1974.
This award follows separate ORP contract awards from General Dynamics to Northrop Grumman's Marine Systems business unit for other ORP components.
"This latest award reflects Northrop Grumman's long standing partnerships with General Dynamics Electric Boat and the U.S. Navy," said Karen Campbell, vice president, Northrop Grumman Marine Systems business unit. "We are proud of our heritage and honored to be part of the Ohio Replacement Program."
The ORP plan is to design and build a new class of 12 ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs) to replace the Navy's current force of 14 Ohio-class SSBNs, which will be retired starting in 2027.  

New Zealand Contract Signed for MBDA’s Sea Ceptor

MBDA

May 27, 2014 - The New Zealand Ministry of Defence signed a contract on 21st May with MBDA for the provision of Sea Ceptor for the Local Area Air Defence element of the Royal New Zealand Navy’s ANZAC Frigate Systems Upgrade (FSU) project. This contract confirms the selection of the system by the RNZN for its ANZAC frigates that was announced in October 2013.
Steve Wadey, MBDA UK Managing Director and Group Executive Director Technical, said: “I am delighted that New Zealand has confirmed its selection of Sea Ceptor for the ANZAC FSU project. This first success in the global market outside the United Kingdom for Sea Ceptor is due not only to its advanced operational and through-life cost advantages, but also to the invaluable support provided by the UK Government and the Royal Navy during discussions with the New Zealand Ministry of Defence. Cooperation between the Governments and the Navies of the United Kingdom and New Zealand will continue to be important to delivering an excellent Sea Ceptor capability throughout the life of the project.”

Monday, May 26, 2014

National Park Service and Autodesk Carry Out First Comprehensive Digital Survey to Preserve the USS Arizona and Memorial

Don Stratton, a survivor of the bombing at Pearl Harbor, holds a 3D print of a cooking pot that rests on the deck of the USS Arizona (Photo: Business Wire)
Don Stratton, a survivor of the bombing at Pearl Harbor, holds a 3D print of a cooking pot that rests on the deck of the USS Arizona.
Honolulu May 26, 2014 - In honor of U.S. military veterans, the National Park Service (NPS) and Autodesk, Inc. hosted a press conference today to unveil preliminary results from the first comprehensive survey of the USS Arizona and Memorial in 30 years and its resulting 3D models.
“You can’t duplicate these artifacts. They represent the beginning of the war, the end of the war and the fact that there is still life there [on the USS Arizona].”
Consistent with Autodesk’s vision to help people imagine, design and create a better world, the survey takes full advantage of the latest technology for the purposes of both historic preservation and public education. Scheduled to be completed later this year, the survey will provide the public with a more detailed view and understanding of this historic site while contributing to the ship’s ongoing preservation.
At today’s Memorial Day press conference, a 3D printout of the USS Arizona showcased details never seen before on paper. In addition, highly detailed 3D models of a cooking pot and Coke bottle that have sat on the ship’s galley for the past 72 years were also created and displayed. Each model featured intricate details including color and the barnacles now present on the cooking pot. Autodesk and NPS hope to create a 3D model of the USS Arizona in its entirety by the end of this year.
“This technological approach helps make the USS Arizona’s legacy come alive that just wasn’t possible before,” said National Park Service Superintendent Paul DePrey. “The USS Arizona is one of America’s most revered historical sites. As its steward, the National Park Service has a mission to share the story of December 7 with current and future generations. Creating 3D models allows people to see and touch these highly detailed and accurate replicas, something that will play an important role in our educational outreach program.”
Also present at the press conference was 92-year-old USS Arizona survivor Don Stratton, one of only nine remaining USS Arizona survivors still alive, and one of only a few hundred to make it off the ship. Stratton was only 19 years old when Pearl Harbor was attacked. He along with six other crew members went hand over hand on a heaving line across the burning deck to safety on the USS Vestal that was moored alongside the USS Arizona that fateful morning. Stratton suffered burns over 70 percent of his body.
When presented with the 3D print of the cooking pot for the first time, Stratton said, “That is amazing. I don’t know anybody in the galley that survived that day. At the time of the explosion, it was self-preservation. After that, it was extremely hard to return. Now, when I go back and remember, it’s a little easier. I think it [3D artifacts] will make an impression on a lot of people, I really do.”
Stratton’s son Randy Stratton, who was also present, said, “You can’t duplicate these artifacts. They represent the beginning of the war, the end of the war and the fact that there is still life there [on the USS Arizona].”
Don Stratton concluded, “I hope they remember all the shipmates that are still aboard the Arizona. And I hope they remember all the people that gave their lives for this great country.”
Approximately 900 remains of the 1,777 officers, sailors and Marines killed still remain inside the USS Arizona; therefore any work done on the ship must be done with extreme care and sensitivity. With this in mind, the NPS is leading the effort to create a highly accurate, 3D digital representation, while minimizing any disturbance to the ship. NPS is employing Autodesk’s reality computing technology, underwater photogrammetry, subsea LiDAR, high-resolution SONAR, and above water laser scanning to conduct investigation and analysis without disturbing the ship.
“The USS Arizona Memorial is such an important yet fragile piece of history,” said Brian Mathews, vice president, Autodesk. “Reality Computing is an emerging concept that bridges the physical and digital worlds, and Autodesk sees great potential in supporting the National Park Service and preservationists around the world with reality computing technology to capture, analyze and communicate these stories of our past for future generations.”
Other organizations involved in the survey include: HDR, Sam Hirota, Inc., Oceanic Imaging Consultants, Inc., 3DatDepth, Shark Marine Technologies, Inc., United States Coast Guard, and the US Navy Mobile Diving Salvage Unit One.

Friday, May 23, 2014

Navy gets BK 117 helicopter

BK 117 helicopter of the Navy of Colombia (ARC-218)

May 22, 2014 (Webinfomil) - After an accident in December 2012 and after countless months of repairs and inspections, the helicopter MBB/Kawasaki BK 117 tuition ARC-218 belonging to the Navy of Colombia was returning to service thanks to the hard work and tireless officers and aviation technicians of the institution. 
The helicopter was involved in an emergency landing in a rural area between the towns of Salamis and Pinion, located in the department of Magdalena; where he suffered considerable damage to its mechanical part.
The aircraft remained at the site of the emergency guarded by Army troops for three days, while looking for the most optimal way to evacuate the area. Finally thanks to the cooperation of the Army, the place was evacuated by means of lifting slings for MI-175V helicopter of Army Aviation.
El BK-117
The MBB / Kawasaki BK117 is a transport helicopter / medium sized utility with two engines. It is a joint development between MBB, Germany, (now part of Eurocopter) and Kawasaki of Japan. BK117 The first flight was in 1977 and since then have built almost 400 helicopters.
It is a seven-passenger twin-engine aircraft with autonomous flight of three hours a cruise speed 250 mph and a load capacity of 3.5 tonnes. It has a rear door to take advantage of the ample cargo space. They have manufactured many variants of this model, both for civil and military market. It is also used as a rescue helicopter and healthcare.
The helicopter was built for the Navy in 2005 after a long process of modernization and maintenance, which will be incorporated special features to operate warships of the Navy.


Naval Air Panama receives a new Bell 412 helicopter this month

Servicio Nacional Aeronaval de Panamá
San Salvador May 23, 2014 -  The National Air Service ( Senan ) of Panama will receive a new Bell 412 helicopter in late May , replacing the injured a couple of months ago, as reimbursement of insurance covering the damaged aircraft.
Replacement Helicopter Senan , registration AN- 137, wrecked in Guna district on 6 February, will come in late May , said the director of the institution, Belsio González . " You must come to our country at the latest before the end of this period ," Gonzalez said.
The new device will have the same features and specifications of the aircraft that crashed into a mangrove Mansukun the town after a chase narco earlier this year in which he died and the captain Agustín Santos Vinda postmortem .
Transported from Kuwait via USA
These helicopters are worth around 13 million dollars and need to be transported by air, from Kuwait to Tennessee, United States. Subsequently , it should be transferred to Panama , as confirmed by the source.
Not yet been reported what has prompted the insurance company to be said for giving an identical helicopter to Panama , it is not yet known the official cause of the accident in which the original aircraft was lost.
In addition , it was learned that the new team will be named the member who died in the accident Senan previous February.



Boeing Delivers 4th P-8I Maritime Patrol Aircraft to India

Boeing

Seattle May 23, 2014 – Boeing has delivered the fourth P-8I maritime patrol aircraft to India on schedule, fulfilling the first half of a contract for eight aircraft.
The aircraft departed from Boeing Field in Seattle and arrived May 21 at Naval Air Station Rajali, where it joined three P-8Is currently undergoing operational evaluation.
“This marks an important milestone – the halfway point for P-8I deliveries to India,” said Dennis Swanson, BDS vice president in India. “The program’s success the past year is really a testament to the great work between Boeing, the Indian Navy and industry.”
Based on the company’s Next-Generation 737 commercial airplane, the P-8I is the Indian Navy variant of the P-8A Poseidon that Boeing has developed for the U.S. Navy.
“The Indian Navy is putting the first three P-8Is through their paces operationally, and the P-8I delivered today will begin flight trials in the coming months,” said Leland Wight, Boeing P-8I program manager.
The P-8I incorporates not only India-unique design features, but also India-built subsystems that are tailored to the country’s maritime patrol requirements. In order to efficiently design and build the P-8I and the P-8A, the Boeing-led team is using a first-in-industry, in-line production process that draws on the company’s Next-Generation 737 production system.
The P-8I features open system architecture, advanced sensor and display technologies, and a worldwide base of suppliers, parts and support equipment. P-8I aircraft are built by a Boeing-led industry team that includes CFM International, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Spirit AeroSystems, BAE Systems and GE Aviation.


World War II Memorial Becomes First Wi-Fi-Enabled Memorial on National Mall

Wikipedia
Washington May 23, 2014 - In partnership with the American Battle Monuments Commission (ABMC), INADEV, a provider of custom, enterprise-scale mobile and technology solutions, announced today the National World War II Memorial will become the first wireless network enabled memorial on Washington D.C.'s National Mall.
The memorial's wireless capabilities and new interactive kiosks will debut during its 10-year anniversary celebration this Memorial Day Weekend at an anniversary event being held on Saturday, May 24th 2014.
The INADEV-designed state-of-the-art kiosks enable visitors to dynamically interact with on-site memorial features by providing additional content, educational games and historical facts at the touch of a finger.
"The WWII Memorial is one of our country's most important dedications to our history, so we wanted to make the visitor experience as fulfilling as possible," said Ferhan Hamid, CEO of the prime contractor INADEV. "This technology will help the story of the greatest generation come alive for younger generations who consume much of their information through mobile and touch screen devices."
The American Battle Monuments Commission, established by the Congress in 1923, is an agency of the executive branch of the federal government and guardian of America's overseas commemorative cemeteries and memorials.
 

The importance of Europe in NATO's maritime work

Defence Secretary Philip Hammond has delivered a speech at the annual meeting of the Chiefs of European Navies in Portsmouth.


British Royal Marines train alongside their counterparts from the French Marine Corps (library image) [Picture: Petty Officer (Photographer) Sean Clee, Crown copyright]

During his speech to the Chiefs of European Navies today, 23 May, Mr Hammond was clear on the role the addressed audience must play in explaining the importance of Europe’s part in NATO’s maritime work in the lead up to the NATO Summit in Wales in September this year.
He discussed how important this coming together of nations was for the future of maritime with an emphasis on finding better ways of working together to tackle shared threats such as international piracy and blockades of economic choke points. Mr Hammond said:
Since the threats we face are global in scale, we must be ready to deploy, willing to project force around the globe, whenever and wherever the need arises. As we head towards the NATO Summit in Wales, we can shape our forces to meet the new security challenges that lie ahead.

British and French paratroopers congratulate each other after a successful joint exercise (library image) [Picture: Corporal Obi Igbo, Crown copyright]
Mr Hammond also referred to the NATO Summit as a chance to “reinvigorate and revitalise our network of alliances”, with particular focus on the development of command and control and logistics structures that will enable UK and France to conduct combined joint operations. He said:
Having proved the concept, we want to expand the principle with the Joint Expeditionary Force. This would involve a maritime task force, commanded by a lead nation that would be generated, trained and validated for NATO operations but able to operate independently while at notice. We plan to sign a Letter of Intent with key potential participating nations at the NATO summit in Wales in September.
NATO Summit Wales 2014 will be the largest gathering of international leaders ever to take place in Britain. As well as discussing Europe’s role in NATO’s maritime work, talk will address issues which threaten NATO countries’ national security and also the withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan at the end of this year.

Coast Guard & National Guard Conduct Ship Boarding Exercise on Oregon Coast


A Coast Guard member from the vessel boarding security team located at Coast Guard Sector Columbia River is lowered from an Air Station Astoria MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter to the motor vessel Ironwood, a Tongue Point Job Corps Center training ship, during a maritime response exercise held in Astoria, Ore., May 21, 2014.  The Coast Guard members were deployed to the Ironwood where they inspected the vessel for potential security concerns.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley
A Coast Guard member from the vessel boarding security team located at Coast Guard Sector Columbia River is lowered from an Air Station Astoria MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter to the motor vessel Ironwood, a Tongue Point Job Corps Center training ship, during a maritime response exercise held in Astoria, Ore., May 21, 2014. The Coast Guard members were deployed to the Ironwood where they inspected the vessel for potential security concerns. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley
A member of Coast Guard Sector Columbia River's Vessel Boarding Security Team is hoisted to the deck of the motor vessel Ironwood by a Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter during a maritime response exercise on the Columbia River May 21, 2014. The multi-agency exercise tested the readiness of the participants' ability to handle various potential threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Zac Crawford
A member of Coast Guard Sector Columbia River's Vessel Boarding Security Team is hoisted to the deck of the motor vessel Ironwood by a Coast Guard MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter during a maritime response exercise on the Columbia River May 21, 2014. The multi-agency exercise tested the readiness of the participants' ability to handle various potential threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Zac Crawford
Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class Billy Porter, passes his K-9 partner, Crema, to Petty Officer 1st Class Ryan Cross, as the board the motor vessel Ironwood, a Tongue Point Job Corps Center training ship, during a maritime response exercise held in Astoria, Ore., May 21, 2014. Porter and Cross are both maritime enforcement specialists and K-9 handlers assigned to Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team Seattle, and are two of the Coast Guard’s several K-9 teams, which are trained to detect the presence of explosive materials on board vessels or waterfront locations.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley
Coast Guard Petty Officer 1st Class Billy Porter, passes his K-9 partner, Crema, to Petty Officer 1st Class Ryan Cross, as the board the motor vessel Ironwood, a Tongue Point Job Corps Center training ship, during a maritime response exercise held in Astoria, Ore., May 21, 2014. Porter and Cross are both maritime enforcement specialists and K-9 handlers assigned to Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team Seattle, and are two of the Coast Guard’s several K-9 teams, which are trained to detect the presence of explosive materials on board vessels or waterfront locations. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley
Petty Officer 1st Class Billy Porter, a K-9 handler from Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team Seattle, and his partner, Crema, conduct a search of the motor vessel Ironwood during a maritime response exercise on the Columbia River May 21, 2014. The multi-agency exercise tested the readiness of the participants' ability to handle various potential threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Zac Crawford
Petty Officer 1st Class Billy Porter, a K-9 handler from Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team Seattle, and his partner, Crema, conduct a search of the motor vessel Ironwood during a maritime response exercise on the Columbia River May 21, 2014. The multi-agency exercise tested the readiness of the participants' ability to handle various potential threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Zac Crawford
One of the suspected radiological devices used aboard the motor vessel Ironwood during a maritime response exercise on the Columbia River May 21, 2014. The multi-agency exercise tested the readiness of the participants' ability to handle various potential threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Zac Crawford
One of the suspected radiological devices used aboard the motor vessel Ironwood during a maritime response exercise on the Columbia River May 21, 2014. The multi-agency exercise tested the readiness of the participants' ability to handle various potential threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Zac Crawford
Two members of the Oregon National Guard's 102nd Civil Support Team follow a Coast Guard flight mechanic out to a waiting MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew which is standing by to fly the two CST members to a vessel of interest on the Columbia River during a maritime response exercise held in Astoria, Ore., May 21, 2014. The members of the 102nd CST train to provide support to community and state authorities in the event of a natural or manmade chemical, biological, radiological, or weapons of mass-destruction incident.  U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley
Two members of the Oregon National Guard's 102nd Civil Support Team follow a Coast Guard flight mechanic out to a waiting MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew which is standing by to fly the two CST members to a vessel of interest on the Columbia River during a maritime response exercise held in Astoria, Ore., May 21, 2014. The members of the 102nd CST train to provide support to community and state authorities in the event of a natural or manmade chemical, biological, radiological, or weapons of mass-destruction incident. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class David Mosley
(Left to right) Sgt. Jamel Mercado from the Oregon National Guard's 102nd Civil Support Team talks with Chief Petty Officer Shawn Copp and Petty Officer 3rd Class Brian Kelly, both maritime enforcement specialists with Coast Guard Sector Columbia River's Vessel Boarding Security Team, during a maritime response exercise on the Columbia River May 21, 2014. The multi-agency exercise tested the readiness of the participants' ability to handle various potential threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Zac Crawford
(Left to right) Sgt. Jamel Mercado from the Oregon National Guard's 102nd Civil Support Team talks with Chief Petty Officer Shawn Copp and Petty Officer 3rd Class Brian Kelly, both maritime enforcement specialists with Coast Guard Sector Columbia River's Vessel Boarding Security Team, during a maritime response exercise on the Columbia River May 21, 2014. The multi-agency exercise tested the readiness of the participants' ability to handle various potential threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Zac Crawford
(Left to right) Sgts. Jamel Mercado and Jason Scott, both with the Oregon National Guard's 102nd Civil Support Team, take measurements surround a suspected radiological device aboard the motor vessel Ironwood during a maritime response exercise on the Columbia River May 21, 2014. The multi-agency exercise tested the readiness of the participants' ability to handle various potential threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Zac Crawford
(Left to right) Sgts. Jamel Mercado and Jason Scott, both with the Oregon National Guard's 102nd Civil Support Team, take measurements surround a suspected radiological device aboard the motor vessel Ironwood during a maritime response exercise on the Columbia River May 21, 2014. The multi-agency exercise tested the readiness of the participants' ability to handle various potential threats. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Zac Crawford
Warrenton OR May 23, 2014 - The Coast Guard participated in a joint maritime response exercise with the Oregon National Guard 102nd Civil Support Team and in cooperation with the Tongue Point Job Corps on the Columbia River near Astoria, Wednesday.
The joint exercise included air and surface delivery of Coast Guard boarding teams and K-9 teams to the motor vessel Ironwood, a Tongue Point Job Corps Center training ship.
During the scenario, Coast Guard teams found mock indications of explosives and potential weapons of mass destruction, detained the ship's crew and brought in the 102nd CST to eliminate the simulated explosive and radiological threat.

“This was a remarkable and realistic exercise that enhanced our ability to respond, in cooperation with the CST, to threats delivered by sea,” said Cmdr. William Gibbons, Coast Guard Sector Columbia River chief of response. "This effort was made possible by our strong and enduring partnership with the Oregon National Guard, as well as with the Tongue Point Job Corps."

Participating in the exercise were members from Coast Guard Sector Columbia River, Coast Guard Vessel Boarding Security Team Sector Columbia River, Coast Guard Air Station Astoria, Coast Guard Station Cape Disappointment, Coast Guard Maritime Safety and Security Team Seattle, Oregon National Guard’s 102 Civil Support Team, and the teachers and students aboard the motor vessel Ironwood, a Tongue Point Job Corps Center training ship.

Thursday, May 22, 2014

Chairman McKeon Statement on Passage of the 53rd National Defense Authorization Act

Washington May 22, 2014 – The Honorable Howard P. “Buck” McKeon, Chairman of the House Armed Services Committee, gave the following statement after final passage of the FY2015 National Defense Authorization Act. The House of Representatives passed the bill by a vote of 325 - 98. 
"For the 53rd consecutive year, Republicans and Democrats have come together to pass the legislation that provides vital authorities and resources for our men and women in uniform. This is solid legislation, built after many long months of intensive oversight work. But, it is not perfect legislation. We had to make too many cuts, too many hard tradeoffs, and too many reductions to bring this bill in with $30 billion less than we gave DoD last year. I fear these will leave our war fighters fewer tools to succeed. Nevertheless, this year we were able to hold off disaster. Unless something changes, the choices next year will be brutal.
“Some have characterized the FY15 NDAA as a sop to parochial interests. That is a lazy dismissal of a long, arduous process that still leaves many holes in our defense and few good choices. Thanks to intense efforts by a bipartisan group of members and staff, we were able to successfully do as the law compels — make the tough decisions that put the troops first. 
“I welcome passage of this year’s bill and I’m eager to start work with the Senate. It is my hope that we get this done before the November election, so that our new House and Senate Armed Services Committee Chairmen will have time to do the hard work and preparation for 2015 and the defense challenges ahead."

National Defense Authorization Bill Includes 24 Year Old Failed Test Program

Petaluma May 22, 2014 - According to the American Small Business League, the 2015 National Defense Authorization Bill (H.R. 4435) includes an extension of the 24 year old Comprehensive Subcontracting Plan Test Program (CSPTP). Under the current bill, the CSPTP would be extended until the end of 2017 even though there has never been any data that found the Test Program achieved its goals.
The CSPTP was supposed to increase federal government subcontracting opportunities for small businesses working with prime contractors. In reality, the Test Program has two dubious provisions that dramatically reduce subcontracting opportunities for small businesses.
The first provision allows participating prime contractors to avoid quarterly subcontracting reports that were once available to the public. The second provision eliminates any penalties for non-compliance with subcontracting goals.
A 2004 investigation by the Government Accountability Office (GAO) found that the Pentagon was unable to produce any data to show the CSPTP had achieved any of the stated goals of improving subcontracting opportunities for small businesses. Report GAO-04-381 stated, "Although the Test Program was started more than 12 years ago, DOD has yet to establish metrics to evaluate the program's results and effectiveness."
Even the language in the current Defense Authorization Bill acknowledges the failure of the 24 year old Test Program stating, "However, after nearly 24 years since the original authorization of the program, the test program has yet to provide evidence that it meets the original stated goal of the program..."
The American Small Business League (ASBL) believes the CSPTP was created after the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled subcontracting reports were releasable to the public under the Freedom of Information Act. The ASBL believes the CSPTP is an intentional loophole that allows prime contractors to circumvent federal contracting law that requires small businesses receive a minimum of 23% of all federal contracts and subcontracts, and then withhold any evidence of contracting fraud.
The Pentagon has refused to comply with Freedom of Information Act requests from the ASBL for specific subcontracting data on prime contractors participating in the Test Program. On May 12, 2014 the ASBL sued the Pentagon under the Freedom of Information Act in federal District Court in San Francisco for refusing to provide subcontracting data on Sikorsky.
ASBL President Lloyd Chapman stated, "A 24 year old Test Program is insane. The Comprehensive Subcontracting Plan Test Program is a loophole that allows the nation's largest prime contractors to violate federal contracting law and cheat American small businesses out of billions of dollars a year in federal contracts. The fact the Pentagon is refusing to release any subcontracting data proves the Test Program is a scam and was intended to legalize contracting fraud. It should be eliminated, not extended."

FRCSE is first Navy depot slated to repair F-35 aircraft components

Steve Reese, an engineer with Northrop Grumman Corporation, right, instructs Dave Aviles, an electronic mechanic at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast's Avionics Division, on using an interface test adapter to analyze signals for testing a shop-replaceable unit for F-35 Joint Strike Fighter radio frequency support electronics during a training session on the new equipment April 11. (U.S. Navy Photo/Released)
Steve Reese, an engineer with Northrop Grumman Corporation, right, instructs Dave Aviles, an electronic mechanic at Fleet Readiness Center Southeast's Avionics Division, on using an interface test adapter to analyze signals for testing a shop-replaceable unit for F-35 Joint Strike Fighter radio frequency support electronics during a training session on the new equipment April 11. (U.S. Navy Photo/Released)      

NAS Jacksonville May 22, 2014 - The Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Site Depot Activation Team is diligently working to establish capability later this month to repair the F-35 Lightening II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) AN/APG-81 Active Electronically Scanned Array radar system earning FRCSE the distinction as the first Navy military depot to work on JSF components.
This declaration of capability allows FRCSE to conduct repairs on all JSF radar components for multiple services including the Air Force F-35A [conventional takeoff and landing] variant and the Marine Corps F-35B [short takeoff-vertical landing] and Navy F-35C [carrier] variants.
“We plan to declare initial capability to repair the first six, line replaceable components for the F-35 radar May 31 under a partnership with Lockheed Martin through the Joint Strike Fighter Program Office (JSFPO),” said Tim Postemski, FRCSE Components Integrated Product Team lead. “The JSFPO has identified FRCSE as the designated repair point for the radar system. Northrop Grumman is developing the radar for the F-35 platform as a core system under Title 10, which means organic [government-owned] military depots perform the repairs.”
To establish capability to repair these state-of-the-art radar systems, workers built a classified work center as part of JSFPO specifications to work on the equipment.
“The FRCSE Site Depot Activation Team has been working over the last couple of years, getting the facility and all logistical elements in place to establish repair capability for the JSF APG-81 radar,” said Mike Minton, FRCSE business management specialist. “The process consists of four phases – planning, identifying items required and ordering equipment, ensuring partnerships are in place and training the artisans,” he continued. “We’ve evaluated the building to determine where the testing benches are set up, power requirements, cooling systems, etc. It’s a huge process, and everyone has to be on the same page.”
The first Lockheed Martin LM-STAR test bench arrived at FRCSE in mid-March.
“It was the first of several testing benches we are receiving,” explained Postemski. “Technicians from Northrop Grumman and Lockheed Martin are currently training FRCSE artisans to work on the new radar equipment. We are in the process of renovating the entire building in preparation to receive several more testing benches in the near future. The radar shop downsized tremendously after the sundown of the F-14 aircraft, but we are now revitalizing the shop and bringing it back to life.”
“The Multi-spectral Targeting Systems and Radar Shop is comprised of 31 artisan technicians,” said Jim Ranieri, the shop supervisor. “Three of our technicians here volunteered to learn the new F-35 radar system. They have completed a week of operator training and two weeks of repair training. Our team will continue working with technicians from Northrop Grumman and Lockheed Martin as more test benches arrive.”
Another aspect of the repair process is to document all data, provide findings and repair requirements to Northrop Grumman for analysis.
“Northrop Grumman is the original equipment manufacturer of the radar system and Lockheed Martin is the integrator for the strike fighter,” said Minton. “This is a huge workload for FRCSE because it also creates work for other shops here, such as the circuit card and cable shops.”
The F-35 JSF is deemed the most powerful fighter aircraft in worldwide history. According to the Lockheed Martin website, the F-35 combines the fifth generation characteristics of radar evading stealth, supersonic speed and extreme agility with the most powerful and comprehensive integrated sensor package of any fighter aircraft in history. Pilots gain real-time access to battle space information to share instantaneously with commanders at sea, in the air and on the ground.
The Fiscal Year 2014 Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 1960/S.1197) recently passed by the House of Representatives and Senate, calls for a planned procurement of 2,443 F-35 aircraft for the Navy, Marine Corps and Air Force to meet fifth generation U.S. fighter requirements.
“These are the next generation of radar systems, and we are excited to be working on them. To be the first FRCSE to declare capability on components for the new F-35 JSF is a tremendous success for our team,” said Postemski.


Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Business Management Specialist Mike Minton, right, and FRCSE Mechanical Engineer Ryan Johnson watch as the first LM-STAR test station arrives at FRCSE March 18. (U.S. Navy Photo/Released)
Fleet Readiness Center Southeast (FRCSE) Business Management Specialist Mike Minton, right, and FRCSE Mechanical Engineer Ryan Johnson watch as the first LM-STAR test station arrives at FRCSE March 18. (U.S. Navy Photo/Released)