Thursday, September 10, 2015

Adelaide completes final sea trials off the Australian coast

Leading Seaman Electronics Technician Jonathan Verran conducts Seaworthiness Material Assessments on the Global Maritime Distress Safety System, as part of BAE Systems Sea Acceptance Trials onboard NUSHIP Adelaide at Williamstown, Victoria. (photo: ABET Callum Payne)
Leading Seaman Electronics Technician Jonathan Verran conducts Seaworthiness Material Assessments on the Global Maritime Distress Safety System, as part of BAE Systems Sea Acceptance Trials onboard NUSHIP Adelaide at Williamstown, Victoria.

Williamstown September 10, 2015 - Australia’s second of the Canberra class Amphibious Assault Ships, Adelaide, has returned to Williamstown, Victoria, following the successful completion of sea trials off the south east Australian coast. 
The second and final trials focussed on testing the ship’s navigation, combat and communications systems and involved more than 30 Royal Australian Navy personnel, including systems operators, maintainers and chefs. 
Commanding Officer Adelaide, Captain Paul Mandziy, described the trials as a critical phase.
“These final sea acceptance trials will determine the shape of the final pre-delivery work package before the ship is delivered to the Commonwealth later this year,” he said.
“Our team is certainly impressing and we have developed excellent relationships with the other 170 sea-riders from the Department, BAE Australia and various sub-contractors.
“We are in an excellent position to leverage from the experiences of our sister ship HMAS Canberra and as a consequence we have built a very close relationship with our peers. 
“We also know what challenges to expect and our crew have had the benefit of sea-riding on Canberra and in working with the systems that will be delivered with Adelaide,” Captain Mandziy said.    
As the 27,800 tonne warship undergoes completion prior handover to the Department of Defence’s Capability Acquisition and Sustainment Group later this month, personnel are completing critical combat survivability and damage control training.
This is being undertaken at a state-of-the-art training facility in Mascot, Sydney, and also at the Navy's School of Survivability and Ship Safety at Jervis Bay on the New South Wales south coast.
It is expected that the full complement of ship’s company will join the ship in Williamstown by early October.
  

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