Tuesday, November 15, 2016

Super Moon Over US Coast Guard Station Portsmouth VA

The supermoon shines over Coast Guard Cutter Forward at Coast Guard Base Portsmouth in Portsmouth, Virginia, November 13, 2016. This supermoon was the nearest and brightest supermoon of 2016 and the largest since 1948. (U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Corinne Zilnicki/Released).
November 14, 2016 - The Coast Guard had a lunar visit Sunday during a supermoon in Portsmouth.
A supermoon is when a full moon's ellipse makes its closest rotation, causing the moon to appear much larger than normal. For U.S. Coast Guard Base Portsmouth, Sunday's supermoon meant a full moon shined brighter than normal on Coast Guard Cutters Sea Horse, Legare, Forward and Harriet Lane. According to NASA, the next supermoon is not forecasted to occur until 2034. The last time it occurred was in 1948.
The supermoon shines over Coast Guard Cutters Sea Horse, Legare, Forward and Harriet Lane at Coast Guard Base Portsmouth in Portsmouth, Virginia, November 13, 2016. A supermoon occurs when the moon is at its closest point of approach in its orbit around Earth. (U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Corinne Zilnicki/Released).
The supermoon shines over Coast Guard Cutter Legare at Coast Guard Base Portsmouth in Portsmouth, Virginia, November 13, 2016. According to a statement from NASA, the full moon will not come this close to Earth again until the year 2034. (U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Corinne Zilnicki/Released).
The supermoon shines over buoys at Coast Guard Base Portsmouth in Portsmouth, Virginia, November 13, 2016. A supermoon occurs when the moon is at its closest point of approach in its orbit around Earth. (U.S. Coast Guard Photo by Coast Guard Petty Officer 3rd Class Corinne Zilnicki/Released).


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